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  • Hypertension

    So what's the deal with high blood pressure and trying to get hired? As long as it can be managed with medication?

    Do any of you take BP meds? What kind? Lisinopril isn't working for me.

  • #2
    As I understand it, long term high blood pressure causes heart damage. Yep, got a touch of that and my blood pressure wasn't all that high, but it wasn't all that high for many, many years. That is the danger. I take Atenolol and it works great. I don't see a problem as long as it is under control and not brought on by being extremely overweight.
    Last edited by MidwestCop; 03-27-2011, 08:53 AM.

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    • #3
      When I got hired by my current agency 7 years ago, I was also diagnosed with High BP with 206/113 being the reading. They freaked out, I freaked out and the sad thing is, I probably had this issue for a year or so before being diagnosed. You can take all the medication you want, but understand that it only helps with the problem but does not provide a solution. The body will get used to various meds and they will be less effective over time. In addition, hypertension can and will damage the kidneys from the increased stress.

      I have taken Lisinopril for quite some time and just had the dose bumped up to 40mg. If it isn't working for you then you need to go back to the doctor and perhaps you need a higher dosed pill such as metaprolol or something else. I would stick with ACE inhibitor though for their kidney protective effects. The idea of just 'managing' these problems with medication does nothing to find the main problem and alleviate it which could be diet, lack of exercise, diabetes or pre diabetic, liver issues, and so on. Medication is sometimes a necessity but throwing the meds at the problem and saying, well it's under control I don't need to do anything else is another issue on its own.
      Moooooooooooo, I'm a goat

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      • #4
        The problem is they don't want you to die of a heart attack on duty or the expense of treating you for a heart attack. You even said, your medicine isn't working. An agency can't take the risk of hiring someone with a pre-existing condition that can be life threatening. We've hired people who's health was in question, but they made it due to prior training and experience, and it bit us in the butt.

        What is the cause of your high blood pressure? If it's just weight and poor diet, you are probably even less likely to get hired than if you had some medical cause.

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        • #5
          Yeah, I've had HBP since I was like 15 years old, and I'm 24 now. I used to take lisinopril when they first detected it at 15 (really it was borderline), and then the doc cleared me to come off it and I joined the military. It's usually been borderline and still is, though my systolic will hit 150's/160's usually when I'm stressed or whatever. They're still not sure why I have it other than that my grandmother on my mom's side had it (deceased) and her daughter, my aunt, has it (she's on Micardis and a diuretic and it's in a good range). Recent blood/urine tests showed nothing abnormal and my EKG was ok too. I just went back on meds (for the first time since before the military) and 10mg lisinopril wasn't doing much, so my doc upped it to 20mg about a week or so ago. My diastolic was down lower, steadily in the 60's and 70's but now it's back up usually in the mid-upper 80's. Doc says that we'll try to couple a diuretic with it as a next step and if that doesn't work, I'm sure I'll be trying something else altogether.

          FRUSTRATING!!!!

          I'm not obese - 5'10/170lbs. That's not me in the avatar, just my role model
          Last edited by Ignite; 03-27-2011, 10:48 PM.

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          • #6
            It can be frustrating but you're doing what is best for your health by actually dealing with the issue. The average person with HBP actually requires between 2-3 different medications to control their BP. Also to be fair, 10mg is a fairly small dose, many people need 40mg.

            Did they ever ultrasound of your belly? Is your BP the same in both arms?

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            • #7
              Go here http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/Cardio.pdf and start reading at the top of page I-8. It will explain the problems associated with hypertension and police work, even when it is controlled by medication.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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              • #8
                For the large majority of people, there is no know cause for HBP. For many, it is believed to be hereditary. For many, medication is the only solution, if you want to call it that. I know many officers that take BP meds. It is very common, along with meds for high cholesterol. I don't know of any agencies around my area that hold HBP against you as long as it is controlled.
                Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant" is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"

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                • #9
                  HPB is serious ... the silent killer. I am in Boston cuz my 46yo brother is in ICU, had a stroke due to undiagnosed HBP. It was undiagnosed cuz he refused to go for regular checkups. Not hereditary in this case ... can't think of a single family member who has had HBP. I reckon for him it was lifestyle.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by itnstalln View Post
                    Did they ever ultrasound of your belly? Is your BP the same in both arms?
                    No ultra-sound of stomach. I'm curious what this would be used to detect...?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ignite View Post
                      No ultra-sound of stomach. I'm curious what this would be used to detect...?
                      Something called renal artery stenosis. It's where one or both of the arteries that supply blood the the kidneys (renal arteries) are narrowed (stenosed). This causes decreased blood flow to one or both of the kidneys. The kidney 'percieves' this decreased blood flow as low blood pressure and will attempt to raise the body's blood pressure. It generally causes high blood pressure that can be very difficulty to control. HBP caused by RAS can essentially be cured by placing a stent to prop open the renal artery. It's not really all that common.

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