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  • Anyone own a Bowflex?

    My wife and I are thinking about investing in a Bowflex. I was wondering if any of you have experience with them. Are they as good as they are rumored to be? We want to be able to get a good strength training workout at home. I hate the thought of spending $1000+ only to be disappointed by the results. I appreciate any feedback. Thanks.
    C. Davis

    "Let us not forget those who gave their tomorrows for our todays"

  • #2
    I've got one and it is great.

    You can go light or you can go heavy. I got all of the options, the 410 pound spring kit and the leg attachments.

    I love it. It will work you out, and the 20 minute a day workout 3 times a week actually works.

    I had knee aches form a couple of surgerys, the bowflex workout makes it much better.

    If it had to do it again, I would.
    "The American People will never knowingly adopt Socialism. Under the name of "liberalism" they will adopt every segment of the socialist program,until one day America will be a socialist nation without knowing how it happened."

    Norman Thomas

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    • #3
      Watchman, what's your level of experience with weight training? I'm curious because I've never tried a Bowflex, but it's aways LOOKED to me like a piece of equipment with which only a very experienced weight trainer might be able to get a decent workout, but that it might be very much more difficult to do on that same unit for someone relatively new to working out. I meant to ask that the last time someone here said he liked Bowflex but I couldn't find the thread again. Thanks.

      My only other concern is that practically all the companies marketing these types of systems and dietary supplements use very deceptive advertising:

      I know they all advertise short workouts, but the main fitness model that most of these companies use in their advertisements is a guy whose profile/interview I've seen before. His entire life is about working out and he's got great genetics too. Nobody looks anything like that guy looks from 60 minutes a week of ANYTHING, including him...he lifts weights extensively and also cross trains to the tune of 2 or 3 or 4 hours daily, in addition to whatever time he (may or may not really) spend on Bowflex or Soloflex, or whatever other product he endorses.

      <small>[ 06-30-2003, 01:44 PM: Message edited by: ProWritingServices4LEOs ]</small>
      No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

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      • #4
        Weight Training ?

        Yeah, 25 years ago. Now that I work for a living and have boys that require alot of time, I just cant do it like I used to.

        I used to do run 5 miles everyother day and swim 2 miles the days I wasnt running.I had some intensive workouts. My personal best bench press was 440 lbs, but to tell you the truth I never went for bulk, I went for maximum strenth and agility. Looking like the Hulk never did appeal to me.

        The bowflew will do exactly as much as you want it to.When you are done, you simply fold it up and stick it in the closet. It'll pretty much do everything a conventional wieght machine will do.

        You can tone with it or work out as hard as you'd like to. Having done both the free weight thing and the weight machine thing , I like it. One thing is you dont need a spotter. You can do it all yourself ands its very quite.
        "The American People will never knowingly adopt Socialism. Under the name of "liberalism" they will adopt every segment of the socialist program,until one day America will be a socialist nation without knowing how it happened."

        Norman Thomas

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        • #5
          </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Originally posted by ProWritingServices4LEOs:
          <strong>

          I know they all advertise short workouts, but the main fitness model that most of these companies use in their advertisements is a guy whose profile/interview I've seen before. His entire life is about working out and he's got great genetics too. Nobody looks anything like that guy looks from 60 minutes a week of ANYTHING, including him...he lifts weights extensively and also cross trains to the tune of 2 or 3 or 4 hours daily, in addition to whatever time he (may or may not really) spend on Bowflex or Soloflex, or whatever other product he endorses.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">Not true. When I was bulked up I used to drive the guys in the gym at work crazy with my workouts. I would walk in, do 6-9 sets on what ever body part I was doing that day, slam down a 40oz protein shake and leave. Most workouts 20 minutes, 40 if I was talking a lot. "Is that all your going to do" or "Your done already" were comments I heard daily from guys that couldn't figure out why they weren't getting any size. Diet discipline and workout intensity are the keys, not time. After lifting for an hour, these would turn around and go to 7-11 and get hot dogs and a big gulp. Not exactly muscle re-building nutrients. I won't argue with you that genetics may play a part too though ?

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          • #6
            If you acknowledge that it's genetics and that everybody in gyms is surprised at your workouts, then it's just not true for YOU, but that's not really helpful to general advice for other people.

            I also know a guy who lives on coke and fruit loops and hardly trains when he's not winning national level body building contests and still looks like a freak anyway all the time...but I wouldn't say it's "not true" that the fruit loops and coke and hardly training "routine" is a terrible idea for 99.9% of people.

            I happened to have been genetically gifted in some areas that made law school easier for me than for most people. After first year I skipped classes for weeks, sometimes only showed up for first day and final exam, and simply listened to commercial lectures on cassette tapes in my car or at the gym throughout the term. Even first year, I spent about one hour a day total preparing for classes, and didn't even own a notebook. But if someone posted that law school requires a tremendous amount of time and academic discipline and diligent classroom attendance, I wouldn't exactly say that's "not true", just because I happened to have been lucky in that respect, you know? You're the last person whose workouts the average weight trainer should emulate in the gym, and I'm the last person whose study habits anybody should emulate in law school.

            I always envied people like you, but they're the last people I'd ask for training advice. I'm open to the idea of trying a Bowflex and I'm going to test one out the next time I see one, but I'm still going to be surprised if it feels like it could replace gym training for those of us with closer-to-average genetics, and/or people without enough gym experience to use a Bowflex productively, even if it feels like it could work for someone with extensive prior gym experience.

            <small>[ 07-04-2003, 11:34 AM: Message edited by: ProWriter ]</small>
            No longer ignoring anybody here, since that psycho known as "Josey Wales" finally got the boot after being outed as a LE imposter by B&G978. Nice job.

            Comment


            • #7
              I guess I didn't make my point entirely clear. (Or maybe even at all clear) What they say in the small print or the legal vebage is: these results are only possible with proper diet and aerobic activity.

              That was the point I was trying to make. Yes, I can cheat a little more than some, but, ANYBODY that does the 20 minute lifting routines they specify with their machine, AND eats the proper level of proteins, carbs and fats (which is harder than heck to follow) AND does 20-30 minutes of aerobic activity a day, will get those results. The lifting is the easy part. Supplying the proper nutrition to rebuild the muscle tissue you have destroyed in that 20 minutes is the pain in the ***** part.

              Thus, I got big because someone taught me the right way to do it. I consumed 300 grams of protein/day spaced out in 3-4 hour increments throughout the day, kept my carbs under 100-150g/day (6 days a week, Sunday's a freebie) and fats always under 50g a day. It's hard to get people to understand that is the part that makes you big, not doing curls for 3 hours.

              I'm back at it again now by the way after having gotten the most out of shape I have been in my life dealing with my wife's issues. Wish me luck. Hopefully in 3-4 months I will be that guy again. Certainly a little balder and more wrinkled version, but the same guy.

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              • #8
                My problem is that I've never been disciplined enough to do my workout at home.... I tend to either skip it or at least cut it short because of one bs excuse or another.

                But belonging to a gym, I made my self go everyday at a particular time and work out no matter what and wasn't so apt to get distracted. And you can pay a lot of dues to a first class gym for what some of these home workout systems can cost you. But I wasn't in to bodybuilding or anything. I just didn't want a heart attack arresting some 18 year old. (And if I worked out, I could eat a little more ice cream now and then!)

                Besides, they had a steam room that I loved! It was a great treat for me after I finished my workout. Unfortunately, emphysema contracted from exposure to drug labs and arthritis in my hip curtailed a lot of exercises. Now I used some dumbells a little to keep some symblance of muscle tone and make sure I walk my dog everyday.

                Jim
                "Life's tough, it's tougher if you're stupid." John Wayne

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                • #9
                  Tanks everyone for the advice...I think. My wife and I did some research (consumer reports, epinions, comparisons, shopping around, etc..) and decided that we weren't ready to invest $2000+ in a Bowflex. We settled on a HealthFX HealthMAX home gym. It uses a different type of resistance than Bowflex (hydraulic) but requires no reconfiguration between exercises and offers more work out options. It came with a pricetag of $507 including all the attachments (butterfly bars, leg extension, ab crunch unit, squat bar etc..), 3 year extended warranty and shipping. Should be here in a couple of days. I'll let you all know how it goes. Thanks again.
                  C. Davis

                  "Let us not forget those who gave their tomorrows for our todays"

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