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Am i loosing it???

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  • Am i loosing it???

    I have been getting ready for an academy. Im not and have never been the best runner. I can do a mile in a little less than 9 minutes, 2 miles in right at under 18 minutes. Not the best but i dont think horrible. Ive pretty much got my situps/pushups down as well. I really need to work on burpies.....anyway I was running on the treadmill today and only did a mile and half in exactly 14:02 and i was absolutely dying...its about normal time more or less...but after i was done i almost threw up and i still had abs to do, which i did. Anyway my question is, is this normal? To have a "bad day" running its never happened to me before and it made me feel like im not ready...any tips???

  • #2
    Short answer yes. It happens.

    If I were you though, you may want to spend more time on your running. You want your mile to be around 8 minutes for the Academy. You should start running outside, there is a big difference then on a treadmill. I learned that lesson the hard way once.
    MDRDEP:

    There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

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    • #3
      This Link will help you. Great advice in it.

      http://forums.officer.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=134383
      MDRDEP:

      There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is something I see most doing wrong and will not adhere too, and I expect you to be no diffrent (no offense). When was the last time you took a break. This is the most over looked yet important aspect to a program. I train 8-10 weeks and then take a full ten days off. You may not have to take ten off, maybe seven, but if you do not give your body a break, it will make you take a break when you do not want too.
        Last edited by _GLOCK_; 01-22-2010, 11:36 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jcioccke View Post
          This Link will help you. Great advice in it.

          http://forums.officer.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=134383
          Good link this is going to help me too. Thanks
          "The answer to this last question will determine whether you are drunk or not: Was Mickey Mouse a cat or a dog?"

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          • #6
            Glock,

            Is that you brother?

            I agree with the rest. Did that all week. Sick though. Don't know about you boys but by day 4 I feel "fat" lol ..sound like my wife
            MDRDEP:

            There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

            Comment


            • #7
              thanks everybody for the advise, i am going to start these interaval type training soon, i cant wait and i really wanna get these times lower!!!!! Thanks again..

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jcioccke View Post
                Glock,

                Is that you brother?
                huh ????

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                • #9
                  Your Avatar?
                  MDRDEP:

                  There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Oh!!! No that is me.

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                    • #11
                      Heya folks,

                      Nice to have a thread that I created cited for the advice given. Granted, none of the advice was given by me, though, I could share some updated details on what has/has not been working for my run times as I can most definitely relate to r1967a's situation.

                      Outside has undoubtedly proven the "place to be," for me and is where 90% of my runs take place. I'm not terribly sure if any future academies will allow the use of mp3 or ipod while on runs, so I choose to omit them to A) provide for the most realistic environment and B) to concentrate on a rhythmic steady breath. I feel the concentration on my breathing has proved equally as effective in producing a steadier pace as drowning out the sounds of my body getting tired with loud rock music.

                      Secondly, one of the most effective strategies I have used as cited in the link, is the use of Fartlek while going around the track. I always walk a fourth of a mile before beginning my run and while walking around I pick four separate points along the track (Point A point B and another Point A and B) in which I will noticeably pick up my pace. It could be as simple as sprinting the distance between the team benches every time you go around or even sprinting the corners of the track. If you could shave off five seconds a lap for 8 laps you're already at a reduction of 40 seconds.

                      My main problem was pushing myself while on the track. I found it significantly easier to maintain a steady pace on a treadmill while the ground was moving for you beneath your feet. When I started running it was always so easy to slow down and not push myself. The sooner I came to grips with the fact that although running faster meant heavier breathing and a more stress on my body; it was always coupled with a significant reduction in time.

                      I found comfort in telling myself that the difference between 10 minutes and 9 minutes is only 60 seconds and knowing that the faster the last lap went the faster I would be finished. Then eventually that 9 minutes became the norm and I was striving for an 8 minute mile.

                      I only started running back in September and have improved my run times from a 10+ minute mile to an 8 minute mile +/- 10 seconds. Today I just ran a 12:20 mile and a half for an agility test and was all sorts of happy at the finish line. The 12:20 is nothing to write to the next Summer Olympic Committee about, but it serves as a personal achievement for myself. Set goal times and when you reach them don't let yourself go back.

                      Running for me has just been a mental game - if you can push yourself to do more then do so - its going to take you the same 5-7 minutes to regain your breath/heart rate whether you run an 8 or 9 minute mile, the difference is (for me at least) the accomplishment one feels for pushing their body to that point.

                      In summation, from a 5 month novice runner: Breathe, set a few spots on the track where you are forced to push yourself, and in my short experience, most importantly, push yourself to do better.

                      ....and listen to the advice of those more experienced than you here at O.com. Awesome. Good luck and let us know how you make out.

                      -MikeO88

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                      • #12
                        Well Done Mike!!!
                        MDRDEP:

                        There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          thanks again everybody for all the advise, im going to try these tips...i usually run outside, but since its been cold ive been on the treadmill, the last thing i need is to get sick..next week or so i should be back outside since its starting to warm up!!!! ill keep yall posted!!!!!

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