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  • Pace For 1.5 Mile Run

    Hello All,

    OK before I ask my question, lets put some disclaimers in. I work out 5 x a week,(weights&Cardio) and in that work out I do 1 hour of Cardio with my heart rate at 70-75% MBPM. Great "Gym" Cardio endurance. (Not Real World)

    I just got a call today for an application I sent out last week, thinking that I would be testing in February. The Recruiter asked me to come out Tuesday the 6th with hopes of getting me into the February Academy. (minus any issues) I read over the requirements for the physical push ups, pull ups ,sit ups, etc. No problem, do them all the time.

    I have not run 1.5 in 12.29 minutes. To be honest I never tried. I don't know if this is quick, slow etc. I do know that its 6 x around a track.

    I did address my concerns about the run, and he told me he would allow me to retake in Nov if I failed. I don't want to fail Tuesday. I am willing to run until I am bleeding.

    My question for anyone, I am going to run tomorrow,and I figured I should walk at a very brisk pace Monday. (correct me if I am wrong-please)

    What pace should I set myself around the track. Please any help would be great. Before the wise As- comments start - I didn't expect this call, and I was applying for the February Test.

    Thank you
    MDRDEP:

    There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

  • #2
    The issue you might have is your legs not being used to the impact, if you haven't done any running at all. You might cramp up, especially your calves. Aside from that, 12:29 for 1.5 miles is not super fast, although just a bit faster than just a slow jog.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Trempel.
      Going to the track tomorrow for an honest assessment on where I stand.
      MDRDEP:

      There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

      Comment


      • #4
        Let us know what happens. Good luck!
        Dispatch: "All units be advised, he's on foot in a red dodge pick up truck."
        Me: "Ummm, control..."

        Comment


        • #5
          You will need to maintain 2:05 per lap for a 12:30. This is really a jogging pace and not very difficult to do for someone in a remotely decent shape.

          If you are running faster than 2:00 (8 min pace) then you should complete the run in time...

          Comment


          • #6
            Gray Patriot,

            How are you doing? We use to talk a year or so ago in here. I think your Avatar was the Patriots if I remember right. Thanks for your answer, much appreciated. Stay warm, Winter is coming.
            MDRDEP:

            There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jcioccke View Post
              Gray Patriot,

              How are you doing? We use to talk a year or so ago in here. I think your Avatar was the Patriots if I remember right. Thanks for your answer, much appreciated. Stay warm, Winter is coming.
              Yup, doing fine! I guess certain parts of NY had snow 10 months out of the year this past year -- only July and August were snow free...

              We will have snow on the ground by Halloween...

              Stay safe!

              Comment


              • #8
                just shoot for 2 min per lap. when i was training for mine, i would usually end up about 1:45 for the first 2 laps, 1:55-2:00 for the next 2 laps and about 2:05 for the last 2. day of my PT all laps were under 2:00, i guess adrenaline kicks in.
                Pain is weakness leaving the body.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well I came up short on the run, I expected it. The Department was great about it (Aced the written and all other facets of the PT) They are going to allow me to train for 3-4 weeks, and come back just to complete the run.

                  When I complete the run, then they will set me up for the next day ti interview and Psych exam.

                  Thanks everyone for your advice & help.
                  MDRDEP:

                  There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jcioccke View Post
                    Well I came up short on the run, I expected it.
                    What was your time?

                    Knowing what profession you're trying for...being in good running shape is obviously critical. Being able to run 1.5 miles in a reasonable time is mandatory for Academy graduation in most states. In CA, I think the cutoff is 10:47 or something like that. So...you really need to train on the tasks that are needed to make it into and out of the Academy.

                    For the 1.5 mi test, you need to practice the actual event outdoors against the clock. Start running about 2-2.5 miles a couple times a week, and mix in interval runs (run fast for a period, jog for a period, repeat). My 1.5 mi times didn't start coming down until I mixed in 30 min slower pace runs with 15 min fast paced runs (alternating 4-5 times a week).

                    Even though the 1.5 mi test is a short duration event, try to help your cause by fueling your body correctly (hydration, carbs, vitamins). For me, that means carb loading the two days prior (Cliffbars, Gatorade, bananas, oatmeal, EnergyBars, etc.) to the run and really hydrating well with water. Just prior to the start of the run (30 min), I get some caffeine in my system as well (i.e. coffee, pills, 5-hour energy drink, whatever you want). Make sure whatever you ingest will sit well in your stomach when running. Bananas are great. Simply being properly fueled can make a huge difference! For me, it's worth 1:30 or better in a 1.5 mi run. If I'm not properly fueled up (low carb lifestyle), I hit a wall after about one mile and my pace falls off a bit. If I'm fueled up, I can "kick" the last .25 mi and push it hard to the finish.

                    Sidenote:
                    I tried drinking the organic beet juice (500ml bottles) from the UK study (showed stamina and endurance gains), but the taste of that stuff is so bad I have five bottles of it sitting around collecting dust now! It's really that bad to drink...eww.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Almost 14 minutes. I expected it to be off. I really appreciate the advice. Thanks again!

                      I am gonna to the 5k training program.
                      MDRDEP:

                      There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't know if this will help at all, but read this advice. It really helped me. I'm a bigger guy: 6'3 248 lbs, so I'm not built for running really. I hope that doesn't mean I can't be a sworn officer. I hope not... But anyway, this really helped me....

                        When I first started running, I weighed 291 lbs. The weight loss helped a lot. But, that doesn't apply to people who don't need to lose weight.

                        I ran a 16:50 1.5 mile in 2/2009.

                        on Sunday I ran a 13:28 1.5 mile and a half. In two months, I have shaved off about 30 seconds and I owe it to this guys advice:


                        If your goal is improved 1.5mi time, then ditch the 2 mile runs. You're wasting energy that could be spent elsewhere. Again, this is if your goal is that 1.5mi time.

                        I'd add some shorter runs (1mi to 1.25mi) that are interval-based. Do you run on a track? If so, sprint the straights and jog the curves. If not, you'll need to do it by time(easier if on a treadmill, otherwise wear a watch). Try a 1:3 or 1:2 ratio - "sprint" 30 sec / jog 90-60 sec. The exact time syou neeed to base on your current fitness level. You may find it best to sprint 60sec/jog 120sec, or you might need to "sprint 30sec / jog 90 sec.

                        This interval training will get your HR higher, increase capillary density (the number of blood vessels in you muscles) increase mitochondrial density (the number of organelles that produce energy in the muscle cells), and increase lactic acid levels in the muscles. The active rest will allow the muscles to recover a bit and metabolize the lactic acid, removing it from the muscles. Lactic acid tolerance is one of the main limiting factors in performance. As it builds in the muscles, it literally begins to prohibit further work. By exposing your muscles to repeated high levels of lactic acid, they 1) become more tolerant of higher levels and 2) become more efficient removing/metabolizing it. Also, the higher intensities will force adaptaions between your lung cells and blood, allowing for more O2 to be absorbed and transferred to the working muscles.

                        Over time, aim to increase the length of time you spend "sprinting", subtracting it from your time 'jogging'. ie: if you do a 16min run, with 30 sec sprint 90 sec run, work on getting 60sec/60sec. Once this 1:1 ratio is achieved, increase the speed of your "sprint" and "jog", and go back to the 1:2 or 1:3 ratio. Clear as mud?

                        Also, apply these to your regular 1.5mi runs. Example: Lets say you currently run a 10min mile (I know your's faster a bit, but let me make the math easier on myself). Your intervals may be something like 7min mile/12 min mile - you'll have to figure out the speeds that work for you. As you start getting better at this interval, and closing in on that 1:1, increase the speed of your 1.5 mile runs, as well.

                        With all the longs runs you've been doing, you should already be in fantastic aerobic shape. These changes wont effect that. Also, with such a strong aerobic base you should see changes very quickly - I mean like nearly every workout for several weeks quickly. Work those intervals hard. "Sprints" should be hard runs that gas you , while "jogs" should allow you time to recover so that you feel ready to "sprint" again.
                        "Character is someone you are when no one is watching."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          POSR- I really appreciate the time you took to type that, an I will try it.

                          I'm a big boy myself, 265 6.3 14% body fat.
                          Love weights, and the elliptical, been doing them for years, I hate running lol

                          The only sport (yes I called it a sport) that I have so much trouble with.
                          Legs and shin go before the endurance gives out. I read some other post, and I'm going to get fitted for sneakers. I believe I read somewhere that most running sneakers are made up to a weight of 180 lbs.

                          Could explain the reason for the shin splints, and leg pain.
                          MDRDEP:

                          There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jcioccke View Post
                            What pace should I set myself around the track.
                            The same pace you started with. If you start on the right foot (no pun intended) then as long as you finish strong you will make the time.

                            I saw you posted that you didn't make it, sorry to hear that. I personally would run every other day the 1.5 as fast as you can while keeping the same pace.

                            If you are not completely out of breath and about to puke by the time you complete the 1.5 run, then you can run faster; you should feel this way every time you run it because that means you are pushing yourself and getting better, anything less just reinforces what you can already do.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well I took everyones advice, and I thank all of you. Today was my 2nd run (taking every other day off) see a tad bit of gains (very little)

                              I have 4 weeks to get where I need to be.

                              If you are not completely out of breath and about to puke by the time you complete the 1.5 run, then you can run faster; you should feel this way every time you run it because that means you are pushing yourself and getting better, anything less just reinforces what you can already do.
                              My God was I feeling all above, and then some. Running is such a humbling activity. I thought I was in great shape - Not at all.

                              Well all, going to down a bottle of Advil and thanks for all of the help.

                              3 weeks and 2 days to go
                              MDRDEP:

                              There are no stupid questions, but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots.

                              Comment

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