Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Statins vs "alternative" measures on cholesterol

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Statins vs "alternative" measures on cholesterol

    I don't think the results of this study should come as any big surprise to anyone. My only issue with it really is it's impossible to know exactly what intervention in the "alternative" group was responsible for the reduction in cholesterol levels. However, it's nice to see the Mayo Clinic involved in looking at supplements and life style changes (e.g., diet and exercise) for controlling cholesterol levels vs simply giving statin drugs, which seems the SOC these days with most docs who know most people will not make the needed changes in lifestyle to control their risk factors for CVD.

    Fish Oil and Red Yeast Rice Studied for Lowering Blood Cholesterol


    ROCHESTER, Minn. — A great deal of scientific evidence shows that cholesterol-reducing medications known as statins can help prevent coronary artery disease. Although the safety of these medications has been well documented, as many as 40 percent of patients who receive a prescription for statins take the drug for less than one year. Doctors believe that several factors — including cost, adverse effects, poor understanding of statin benefits and patients' reluctance to take prescription medications long term — may explain why some patients stop taking these medicines. In the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, a group of researchers from Pennsylvania examine whether an alternative approach to treating high blood cholesterol may provide an effective treatment option for patients who are unable or unwilling to take statins.

    Study design

    Researchers followed 74 patients with high blood cholesterol who met standard criteria for using statin therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to either the alternative treatment group or the statin group and followed for three months.

    The alternative treatment group participants received daily fish oil and red yeast rice supplements, and they were enrolled in a 12-week multidisciplinary lifestyle program that involved weekly 3.5-hour educational meetings led by a cardiologist, dietitian, exercise physiologist and several alternative or relaxation practitioners. Red yeast rice is the product of yeast grown on rice. A dietary staple in some Asian countries, it contains several compounds known to inhibit cholesterol production.

    The statin group participants received 40 milligrams (mg) of Zocor (simvastatin) daily, as well as printed materials about diet and exercise recommendations. At the end of the three-month period, participants from both groups underwent blood cholesterol testing to determine the percentage change in LDL cholesterol.

    Results

    The researchers noted that there was a reduction in LDL cholesterol levels in both groups. The alternative treatment group experienced a 42.4 percent reduction, and the statin group experienced a 39.6 percent reduction. Members of the alternative therapy group also had a substantial reduction in triglycerides, another form of fat found in the blood, and lost more weight.

    "Our study was designed to test a comprehensive and holistic approach to lipid lowering," notes the study's lead author, David Becker, M.D., a Chestnut Hill Hospital and University of Pennsylvania Health System cardiologist. "These results are intriguing and show a potential benefit of an alternative, or naturopathic, approach to a common medical condition."

    Dr. Becker acknowledges that a larger, multicenter trial with longer follow-up is necessary to determine long-term compliance with the alternative regimen, because previous studies involving diet and exercise have found a high rate of patients unable or unwilling to follow lifestyle recommendations.

    "The excellent adherence in the alternative group was undoubtedly related to the intensive follow-up, education and support provided for this group," says Dr. Becker.

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/news2008-rst/4902.html
    - Will

    Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

    www.OptimalSWAT.com

    General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

    www.BrinkZone.com

  • #2
    If you take statins, you should probably also take a coenzyme Q10 supplement, because statins work by blocking a substance that is not only a cholesterol precursor but also is a CoQ10 precursor.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
      If you take statins, you should probably also take a coenzyme Q10 supplement, because statins work by blocking a substance that is not only a cholesterol precursor but also is a CoQ10 precursor.
      I cover that issue a bit via a conference I recently attended:

      http://forums.officer.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=129469

      Anyone taking statins should be taking CoQ10 for sure.
      - Will

      Performance/Fitness Advice For the Tactical Community

      www.OptimalSWAT.com

      General Performance/Fitness Advice for all

      www.BrinkZone.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Right on, WillBrink.

        The statins block mevalonate formation, and so interfere with ubiquinone (CoQ10) anabolisation.

        CoQ10, in the mitochondria, facilitates electron transfer, earlier from one protein complex to another, and later to ATP (adenosinetriphosphate). It's also important for neural function. CoQ10 deficiency may contribute to such statin-therapy side effects as anterograde amnesia and dementia.

        Some downside neural effects of statins are partly attributable to the affinity of the brain for certain cholesterols that statins block. LDLs (low-density lipoproteins) are unfriendly to cardiac arteries, but some intracranial cells like them just fine, and some can't perform as well without them. CoQ10 supplementation, even though it's beneficial, does not alleviate that downside effect of use of statins.

        Even so, some persons experiencing some downside neural effects of statins, have found some of them alleviated by CoQ10 supplementation.

        The adult human body reserve of CoQ10 is about 2 grams, and the average depletion rate requires a replacement supply of about a half gram per day, and that must be provided by endogenous synthesis and direct ingestion. Endogenous CoQ10 synthesis in humans decreases markedly after the second decade, and the average daily CoQ10 dietary intake of most persons in the US is probably less than 5 mg. per day. CoQ10 supplement ingestion (up to about 500 mg. per day) is probably appropriate for most persons over 70, and in lesser amounts for anyone over 50.

        CoQ10 is also a potent antioxidant and has other beneficial functions.

        My Mom's in her 80s now (thanks be to God and to all who have helped and who continue to do so) and I persuaded her to start taking CoQ10 as soon as her physician started her on statins. My Dad is of similarly advanced age (thanks again God and everyone), and is taking a low dose (10 mg.) of statins, and isn't quite as persuaded by my sayso about the CoQ10 supplementation as Mom is, even though he understands the biochemical theory behind it quite well. Oh well, he seems to be doing fine, and I guess we'll have to wait 'til we're both in Heaven to compare notes and theories.

        At the funeral of an atheist friend of mine, I remarked that if he was right, he wouldn't get to say "I told you so" to me, but that if I was right, I would get to say that to him.

        Regards,

        Monty
        Last edited by Monty Ealerman; 09-15-2009, 07:21 PM.

        Comment

        MR300x250 Tablet

        Collapse

        What's Going On

        Collapse

        There are currently 6047 users online. 318 members and 5729 guests.

        Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

        Welcome Ad

        Collapse
        Working...
        X