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  • What's the difference?

    What is the difference between the Mossberg 500 and the Mossberg Maverick?
    He teaches my hands to make war,
    so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
    Psalms 18:34

  • #2
    Never mind. Got the info I was looking for.



    Mossberg Maverick

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    The Maverick 88 is a less costly to manufacture, simplified version of the pump action, 12 gauge Mossberg 500 shotgun.
    Factory Maverick 88's feature a black, synthetic only stock and forearm, cylinder bore (although chokes are available), and cross-bolt safety. Accessories are mostly compatible with the Mossberg 500.
    The Maverick line of shotguns are assembled in Eagle Pass, Texas using foreign (Non-USA) manufactured parts, mainly from Mexico; which contributes to their relatively lower price in comparison to the Mossberg 500 series of shotguns which is assembled and manufactured in the USA.
    The trigger groups will not interchange between Maverick 88 and Mossberg 500 guns, but the majority of other parts including barrels, stocks, and shell magazines will (the barrel and magazines must be the same length).
    Maverick 88 shotguns feature a trigger guard mounted cross-bolt safety as opposed to a top tang safety, which is used on the Mossberg 500 series.
    Early Model 88's were equipped with a single slide rail, but this was updated to a dual slide rail in 1990.
    Maverick 88's are factory finished with paint (receiver) and steel bluing (barrel/magazine) only, whereas Mossberg 500's have factory paint/blued, stainless steel or parkerized (receiver/barrel/magazine) options.
    There are two basic models of the 88, the 88 field and the 88 security. The 88 field comes with a longer 28" vent-rib barrel, whereas the security comes with an 18-1/2" or 20" non-vent-rib barrel. The 88's have a cartridge capacity of 6 or 8 shots and cannot have their magazines easily extended without machining.
    He teaches my hands to make war,
    so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
    Psalms 18:34

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    • #3
      For the casual user, the only practical difference is the location of the safety. I bought my Mav 88 last winter and while it hasn't had to stand up to rough handling, I have put at least a few cases of shells through it without a hitch. It's my backup/loaner gun for the trap range, as well as a spare house gun.

      I bought it with the 18" cylinder bore and while I didn't originally purchase the gun for use on the range, it inevitably found its way there. It was an exercise in frustration until I was able to pick up a spare 28" barrel with an improved choke for $75. I never intend to mount the pistol grip that it came with. The only thing I don't care for about the gun is the location of the action release, behind the trigger guard on the left side (same as on the Moss 500).

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      • #4
        The names?

        “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed."

        "You go for a man hard enough and fast enough, he don't have time to think about how many's with him; he thinks about himself, and how he might get clear of that wrath that's about to set down on him."

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        • #5
          ^^^ Thats what Im thinkin!
          He teaches my hands to make war,
          so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
          Psalms 18:34

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by velobard View Post
            For the casual user, the only practical difference is the location of the safety. I bought my Mav 88 last winter and while it hasn't had to stand up to rough handling, I have put at least a few cases of shells through it without a hitch. It's my backup/loaner gun for the trap range, as well as a spare house gun.

            I bought it with the 18" cylinder bore and while I didn't originally purchase the gun for use on the range, it inevitably found its way there. It was an exercise in frustration until I was able to pick up a spare 28" barrel with an improved choke for $75. I never intend to mount the pistol grip that it came with. The only thing I don't care for about the gun is the location of the action release, behind the trigger guard on the left side (same as on the Moss 500).
            The tang mounted safety is one of the nicest 500 features in my book, it is ambi for one thing.

            Bill
            Just pay your dues, and be quiet :-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by willbird View Post
              The tang mounted safety is one of the nicest 500 features in my book, it is ambi for one thing.

              Bill
              Yes, I agree. However, the placement of the action release on both models baffles me. Admittedly I haven't handled a lot of modern pump shotguns so maybe I'm off here, but to me the location is hardly ambi and is awkward and slow for a right-hander to instinctively release without a fair amount of practice. My wife is comfortable carrying "cocked and locked", but she insists that a house shotgun be kept with the chamber empty.

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              • #8
                For what it's worth, please tell your your wife that this guy (me) believes that guns kept for home defense should be loaded. Having to load the gun can mean precious time. Your wife's trepidity about immediacy of availability of a load to a firearm, i.e. the load being in the chamber, shouldn't be allowed to reduce the safety preparedness of the two of you. Do you have kids? If you do, obviously that requires some special care regarding firearms in the home, maybe even keeping them unloaded, depending on the age and training of the kids.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I keep my shotguns and rifles in "Cruiser Ready" with chamber empty and safety on. The only reason for doing this is continuity in training. My department requires that our duty long guns are carried this way so that is how my home guns will be setup.

                  Children DO pose a need to restrict immediate access to a loaded weapon. I have a small electronic safe that housed my duty handgun when it's not on my person. My AK sits in Condition 3. My 6 year old is not strong enough to draw back and release the bolt on the AK. This is an effective "safety device" for the time being since he is not left home alone. This works for MY FAMILY. It may not work for yours. I am researching my next layer of security for when my child is able to cycle the actions on the long guns. Then those will have to be locked, but still ready.

                  I use a two pronged approach. I gunproof my child with education. I then place reasonable mechanical barriers in place so that the weapon cannot be discharged.

                  A pump shotgun with an empty chamber is not a big deal as long as you do not wait for a "target" to cycle the action AND you train with an empty chamber. The way I currently train with my 870, as soon as I grab the weapon I cycle the action to load a shell.
                  "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
                  8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree with your sense of caution regarding the kids, and with your idea about training continuity, but the need to rack a round deprives you of the silence option and so could deprive you of the advantage of surprise and give away your position. I unload anything that's not on my person if kids are around. One thing about your kid not being able to pull the slide: having kids, I'm sure you know not to underestimate their resourcefulness. Some kids have accidentally shot themselves because they couldn't do the trigger pull on a weapon they thought was unloaded, and turned the weapon around and pulled with both thumbs. Tragic. I agree with your "two-pronged approach".

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Monty Ealerman View Post
                      but the need to rack a round deprives you of the silence option and so could deprive you of the advantage of surprise and give away your position.
                      Yes, HOWEVER you have to consider the scenario. Chambering an 870 can be done fast or it can be done relatively quietly. I don't believe in the "racking sound" as a deterrent, HOWEVER should a criminal hear me chambering the shotgun and decide to make a fast exit that just means I wont be paying for crime scene cleanup.
                      "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
                      8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        To rack or not, that is the question..

                        Yes, I,ve always have called that the "Rattlesnake dilemma" To rack or not rack. Variables can be Multifaceted.
                        Originally posted by mookster
                        Sully, usually I hafta glance over your posts cuz my brain would have issues with the imagery you portray, however with that one I get it. I agree one hundred percent with ya.
                        Originally posted by CityCopDC
                        I swear to god you are not human. I know a rogue VI when I see one.
                        Originally posted by OfficerDotCom
                        I think no one is probably happier than Sully and I that we ARE NOT the same person.(seriously thanking God for that one).
                        -Frank




                        Old Physicists neva' die, they just hop on a horsey and fly away inta' an infinitely massive black ho ...

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