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  • Dry Firing

    Crazy's post about the probs with his revolver got me thinking about this. I'd always thought that it was a bad idea to dry fire a gun because it could damage the firing pin and stuff. Lately though I seem to see people doing it a lot and I even read an article the other day where the author recomended it. Apparently they think that it's good for getting used to trigger pull and stuff. So is dry firing good or bad??
    Law abiding citizens sleep peacefully in their beds solely because dedicated men and women stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

  • #2
    Hey Badge,

    I was with Crazy at the range when his S&W was misfiring. I could definitely see that the mis-fires may have been caused by the wear on the firing pin.

    That's why you want to get a set of "Snap Caps". These are "dummy bullets' that you load into your gun for dry firing, firearms drills, and any other situation where you would need to dry fire your gun.
    I have never heard of dry firing being good for your gun. In fact I have heard many people tell me never ever do it.

    Here is a Link to a website that sells these Snap Caps, in just about every caliber you may need: Snap-Caps

    I just did a basic search on Yahoo for Snap Caps. If you search around, you may find a better price, or a more reputable dealer.
    But, I too would love to know what everyone else thinks of this issue, especially what was said about dry firing being good for your gun.

    Thanks much.
    -Adam

    "It is life near the bone where it is sweetest" -Henry David Thoreau

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    • #3
      Not good so much for the gun, I think, as much as for the owner's control over recoil and aim.

      (PS: those mis-fires were really embarassing ... it sucks going to the range with a friend and having your gun start sucking!)

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      • #4
        IMO, it is not a good idea to buy a range gun. They usually get treated badly, and are usually sold when they give problems.

        Depending on the firearm, dry firing may not hurt it at all. If in doubt use a fired case or snap cap.

        [ 07-27-2002: Message edited by: MikeTx ]

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        • #5
          Mike,

          Almost all of Continental Arms' rentals are for sale. I think they just constantly rotate through them.

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          • #6
            We did several dry fire drills for familiarization in my academy, although my Beretta manual says it does not recommend the practice. When I do it at home, I use a spent shell (for obvious reasons) just in case.
            "A man's got to know his limitations" --Inspector Harry Callahan in Magnum Force

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            • #7
              Most modern firearms can take a moderate amount of dry-firing without damage. It's not going to help the gun, of course, but it shouldn't cause the firing pin to break if you accidently let the hammer drop on an empty chamber...

              Snap-caps or a used shell don't count as dry-firing in regards to damaging the firearm and shouldn't be a problem. I dry-fire in a roughly 20-1 ratio...for every round that goes downrange, 20 space aliens/Imperial Storm Troopers/talk show hosts have died a grisly death.

              I think it helps...FWIW.
              I haven't felt this good since we stole the 2000 elections!--Ned Flanders

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              • #8
                using a spent shell dosen't help much because the spent primer gets dented in real fast and dosen't stop the firing pin from rebounding, which is what causes the damage in the first place.

                Snap caps work good but are kinda expensive and wear out fast.

                I've dry fired my Beretta and Smith a zillion times and never had a problem, If the firing pin breaks it's a $5- part although on a Beretta it is a pain in the butt to replace.

                Dry fire away and dn't worry about it. Just don't do it with .22s or certain rifles.

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                • #9
                  (PS: those mis-fires were really embarassing ... it sucks going to the range with a friend and having your gun start sucking!)
                  Don't worry about it Crazy! It is good practice on learning how to react to a misfire or jam. As long as no one is shooting back, there is no reason to worry.
                  -Adam

                  "It is life near the bone where it is sweetest" -Henry David Thoreau

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                  • #10
                    I don't know about that Adam, if I had been there, I KNOW I would have started laughing so hard my pants would have fallen down!

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                    • #11
                      It depends on the firearm. Some guns are damaged by dry-practice some aren't.On a revlover snap caps are probably a good idea. On a Glock they are not needed.
                      Bill R

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                      • #12
                        I don't know about that Adam, if I had been there, I KNOW I would have started laughing so hard my pants would have fallen down!
                        It wasn't too bad, Mike. I did feel kinda goofy watching my arms instintively react to the recoil, and then...nothin'. Looked like I had a bit of a twitch going. But, other than that, it wasn't awful.
                        Like I said, as long as those paper targets dont fire back, I have no problem dealing with a couple mis-fires.

                        BTW, having the mis-fires did show me how my arms/body reacts to pulling a trigger. Is there a proper way to react to recoil? I know you shouldn't "limp wrist" a gun when firing, but is it correct to keep your arms and wrists rigid to try and retain your sight picture? I noticed a big difference when doing double taps as well. any suggestions??

                        Thanks much!
                        -Adam

                        "It is life near the bone where it is sweetest" -Henry David Thoreau

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                        • #13
                          Adam if your gun moves when you drop the hammer on a dud, then you are moving when it fires as well, If I understand what your are asking.

                          It's called a flinch, and will greatly diminish your accuracy. It's caused by anticipating recoil. I still do it once in a while.

                          A great way to notice it, and eliminate it, mostley, is to have your freind Crazy load the revolver for you, and don't load every cylinder. Leave two empies or more, and spin the cylider so no one knows where the live ones are. You'll be able to see when you flinch and can then work on ignoring the recoil. Just practice a clean, smooth triger pull, and don't worry about flinching, and eventually you'll be rid of it. Also, you might try some reduced loads for a while.

                          It's really nothing to be ashamed of as we all do it at first.

                          [ 07-28-2002: Message edited by: MikeTx ]

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                          • #14
                            Geez Mike what is it with you and pulling your pants down all the time??

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                            • #15
                              I DIDN'T SAY I PULLED THEM DOWN, I SAID THEY FELL DOWN! LAUGHING AT YOU!!!!!!!!

                              Comment

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