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  • Buying a firearm on your shield vs civilian.

    I tried searching this but didn't come up with a thread that answered my question.

    What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of buying a new firearms on your shield vs going through the civilian process?

    I would really appreciate it if someone could explain this to me.
    "Why you harassing me?"

  • #2
    It makes no difference in AZ. In fact, the fastest way to buy a gun is to use my concealed carry permit... which any lawfully minded civilian can (and should) have.

    There are a couple stores that have pricing incentives on popular "duty" and "backup" handguns. That's the only advantage I've ever observed.
    "Too many times, too many times payin' the price, just for the thrill" - Tesla

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    • #3
      There is no difference. The paperwork is the same. You may, however, get a discount.
      I find it interesting that my police credentials, which include an exhaustive background check, psychological screening and drug testing, let alone the lengthy education process in the academy, have NO bearing on firearms purchases. Yet, if I take a 8 hour concealed carry course, that card permits me to bypass the instant background check.

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      • #4
        Advantages: No waiting period (if I get a letter from the Sheriff okaying it), might get a discount.

        Disadvantages: Agency knows what guns I own.
        Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

        I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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        • #5
          In CA, if you're a active duty peace officer you can purchase handguns that are not on the state's "approved" list and high capacity magazines. An official letter from the department is only needed if you don't want to deal with the waiting period. Upon retiring, "off-list" weapons and high capacity magazines can be kept, but the magazine can't be sold to anyone other than active LE.

          "Assault weapons" are a whole different matter. Although you can still purchase them with a department letterhead, upon retirement, you must either sell them (out of state only) or donate them to the agency. You can't lawfully keep these, unless you owned them prior the applicable "ban" that addressed the particular weapon.

          It's all pretty stupid, considering anyone involved in criminal activity just ignores the prohibitions and the laws are so complex and conflicting that even senior (CA) Department of Justice personnel are confused about them.
          "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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          • #6
            Other than a discount (which is significant for Glocks (here)), there is absolutely no difference here. You go through the same procedures, which is walk in the door, pick out your gun, give the guy your drivers license/commission, and while he runs you through the instant check, continue shopping for the accessories, you know, holster, extra magazine(s), ammo, cleaning equipment, etc. By the time you're finished shopping, you pay and walk out with your gun.

            fdkay - that CCW permit bypassing the background check must be a TX only thing. I've carried concealed (legally) in Washington, Colorado, Utah, and now Louisiana, and since they started the background check, I've always had to go through it. You're right, seems strange that they would get a break and LEO's don't.

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            • #7
              I've done in the past. Same procedures must be followed for any legal firearm sale, except the price was slightly reduced by the gun shop/manufacturer. Sometimes a larger capacity magazine will be provided with the firearm, where a civilian is not allowed a high-cap mag.
              The views/opinions expressed here are solely mine. I'm retired and I don't care. I truly do not want to offend anyone, but if you are thin skinned and have no sense of humor, you better find another line of work. Therefore, I don't have to be politically correct and I will exercise my freedom of speech, until it's taken away. May God bless all retirees. We've done our duty and earned our peace.

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              • #8
                One of the biggest differences is the ability to buy a firearm from an out of state supplier when purchasing it "letterhead" or "for duty use."

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                • #9
                  Unless you are talking about Title II purchases there really isn't any difference here in Indiana. NY or NYC may have local laws that make it harder for the average joe vs. a cop to buy a gun. (just typing that put a bad taste in my mouth).

                  If we are talking about Title II guns it really is the DEPARTMENT's property when purchased on letterhead and CAN ONLY BE USED FOR DUTY PURPOSES. There have been some cops who have had to deal with the wrath of the BATFE for picking up Full Auto toys under the guise of duty use.
                  "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
                  8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

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                  • #10
                    The "letterhead" purchases I was talking about involved individual officer purchase of handguns, which do not require the officer to get rid of the weapon on retirement or leaving the job, and do allow for off duty carry.

                    But I do agree that the rules are different for fully auto weapons.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you for all the info.

                      So basically its pretty much the same paper work then, except some times you get a discount on the firearms. I've also been told that if you buy a weapon on your shield if you're ever suspended than your agency can take them since you bought them on your shield unlike if you buy it as a regular civilian with a gun permit they can't touch your weapons.
                      "Why you harassing me?"

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                      • #12
                        I've also been told that if you buy a weapon on your shield if you're ever suspended than your agency can take them since you bought them on your shield unlike if you buy it as a regular civilian with a gun permit they can't touch your weapons.
                        I don't think that's true. Once an officer makes a letterhead purchase of a handgun, the weapon belongs to him, not his agency.
                        Politically Correct? No.

                        Truthful? Yes!

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                        • #13
                          The only way I can think of that happening is if you signed some type of contract with your agency when you purchased the weapon. Then the weapon would be their property not yours. As long as it's legally YOUR property, then they cannot take it back.

                          I.E. my agency can require me to turn in all of my initial issue if I am fired or resign, but they cannot request any LE job related equipment that I purchased on my own dime (like my shotgun, patrol rifle, extra uniforms, etc.)
                          "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
                          8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by blackhorse View Post
                            fdkay - that CCW permit bypassing the background check must be a TX only thing.
                            You can bypass it in Oklahoma with a CCW as well.
                            ****I am NOT a LEO, I am NOT a Lawyer, and I am NOT a Defendant****

                            Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris.

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                            • #15
                              That used to work in Indiana as well, until we went to the instant background checks. Now any "proper person" can cash and carry without a waiting period.
                              "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
                              8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

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