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  • #46
    Originally posted by Reedo View Post

    Yes. The dot is bright and it doesn’t require a “sight focus” like with iron sights. Traditional irons require a three-plane sighting system. You have the rear sights, front sight and target/threat. You have to constantly transition between those three to assure they’re aligned, with most attention being put on the front. This constant transitioning of sighting plane plays hell with your eyes. I am supposed to wear glasses (I have them, but I don’t wear them because it’s not THAT bad...yet.), so I get where you are coming from. Having a red dot makes your life a lot easier because it causes your eyes to have to do a lot less work. You just look at the target and superimpose a bright red dot over it. You are not transitioning between numerous sighting planes, and essentially now only dealing with a single sight plane.
    I appreciate your input, but I already have a good understanding of how sights work.

    If you're not wearing glasses that you've been prescribed, then we may or may not be comparing apples to apples. What specifically are your glasses prescribed for? How old are you, and do you need reading glasses at this point? If you need reading glasses, what correction do you use?

    I am slightly myopic (near-sighted), around 20/30 or so. If I remove my contact lenses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. I am 57 years old, and use reading glasses, but only a 1.0 correction. When I don't wear my contact lenses or my reading glasses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. When I wear my contact lenses AND my reading glasses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. But when I wear my contact lenses and am not wearing my reading glasses, it is a challenge.

    We have put optics in the hands of older shooters at our agency, and they have all noted the ease of sighting and shooting with an RDS over irons.
    That is encouraging, but without knowing the specific state of their eyes, there is no way to know if their situation is comparable to mine.





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    • #47
      Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

      I appreciate your input, but I already have a good understanding of how sights work.

      If you're not wearing glasses that you've been prescribed, then we may or may not be comparing apples to apples. What specifically are your glasses prescribed for? How old are you, and do you need reading glasses at this point? If you need reading glasses, what correction do you use?

      I am slightly myopic (near-sighted), around 20/30 or so. If I remove my contact lenses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. I am 57 years old, and use reading glasses, but only a 1.0 correction. When I don't wear my contact lenses or my reading glasses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. When I wear my contact lenses AND my reading glasses, I can see the sights on my pistol perfectly. But when I wear my contact lenses and am not wearing my reading glasses, it is a challenge.



      That is encouraging, but without knowing the specific state of their eyes, there is no way to know if their situation is comparable to mine.




      I’m 37 and I was tested at 20/30 the last time I went to the optometrist 10 years ago. I know I’m worse now. I have glasses and don’t wear them regularly during my life like I used to for patrol, but I use them on the range during long range sessions or training courses. I have worn them with the RDS and it’s the same as without glasses. Every guy with glasses I/we (agency) have put behind a RDS has seen benefit. The only people that can’t use RDS, or have difficulty with RDS are people with astigmatism. It’s no different than with RDS on a rifle, and I’ve been instructing for over a decade both for agency and in the private/contract sector. Nearsighted and farsightedness don’t matter when it comes to the resolution of the dot, because you’re not staring at the dot. The question is whether you can see the target. That applies to both RDS and iron sights. Astigmatism is different. There have been guys with glasses WAAAY worse than yours, including my dad (retired LEO), who was blown away by the ease of an RDS. In fact, he used to be a Distinguished Master ranked target pistol shooter (MPPOA shoots run by NRA rules). He got behind my old Gen4 G17 MOS with RMR and when he shot it, he said he hasn’t shot that well with a pistol for at least 20yrs. Point being, you will likely see benefit. Thing is, nobody will be able to tell you anything that you’ll believe until you see for yourself. Then you’ll understand. With pistol RDS, you have to try it to truly get it.

      As you age, your eyesight gets worst and you require more light to see things. This is heavily documented, and actually included in documents presented by Aaron Cowan of Sage Dynamics. In his LE Pistol RDS Instructor course last summer, he presented that info and he has a lot of medical data and studies to support the assertion of the benefit of an RDS to people with diminished eyesight, particularly with aging eyes.
      Reedo
      Una Stamus
      Last edited by Reedo; 02-20-2020, 12:12 AM.
      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence."
      -John Adams


      Disclaimer: My statements are personal opinions, and in no way reflect those of my agency.

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      • Aidokea
        Aidokea
        Forum Member
        Aidokea commented
        Editing a comment
        Okay, I copy all of that. Thanks for taking the time to type that all out. I believe that I understood all of what you posted.

        The only thing we haven't accounted for, is the fact that you and I are on opposite sides of 40. I asked you about reading glasses, but you did not mention needing them, nor did you appear to differentiate between prescription corrective lenses and reading glasses.

        Im gonna try to explain it, but most people under 40 don't seem to understand what happens when our eyes get "stuck" at about age 40 and no longer focus up close, until they experience it themselves.

        This is a completely separate problem from being "nearsighted" or "farsighted", and it has nothing to do with older eyes needing more light, although all of these things effect each other. I'm sure you've seen older people doing the "trombone" motion, trying to hold something far enough away that they can focus on it.

        So for those of us with "stuck" eyes, if the dot is focused within the sight itself, we would (at least in theory) have a hard time seeing it in focus, even though the "more light" and "lining up three things" issues would certainly be legitimate. But if the dot is somehow focused at some distance beyond the weapon, then we would (at least in theory) not have a hard a time seeing the dot in focus.

        I hope that made sense...
        Aidokea
        Forum Member
        Last edited by Aidokea; 02-20-2020, 04:10 AM.

    • #48
      We added red dots to our pistols this summer. I'm more accurate with it, but slower to acquire the dot.

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