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  • New to Hand Guns, Need a Good First gun

    Hello All, I am not a LEO yet, I have a bunch of Apps pending.

    I have never fired a gun before and I am looking to purchase my first firearm, I am looking for a reliable gun and easy to handle. I am a huge fan of the HK P2000 but 900$ for a starter gun is a tad extreme.

    So I guess a SIG, Glock, S&W MP just a few options

    Thanks for the help guys,
    We remember the officers who we never really knew,
    Persons strong enough to answer the challenge are few,
    With heavy hearts we mourn the officers in eternal rest,
    There's more to these people than the badge on their chest.

  • #2
    First, get some proper basic training.

    Second, find a range near you that rents guns. Shoot a variety until you find one you shoot well and are comfortable with the operation. After you buy it, it is too late to find out you can't work the slide stop, the trigger is to far forward for you to reach, or any other number of problems.

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    • #3
      Buy the SIG! Enough said....

      Actually, get the instruction and find a range that rents various handguns. If you can't find one, you can always go to a shop and see how the various grips fit your hand.

      I would also check your local department's policies before you buy. I had previously bought a Glock 31 with the intent to use it as my primary sidearm with the Dallas PD...Got hired and learned that they are only allowing officers hired after 1/1/05 to carry Sigs in 9mm or .357sig....Still kept the glock though....

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      • #4
        I recommend you don't buy a gun unless your department doesn't issue you a weapon. Its much easier to teach someone who has never used a firearm, then it is to teach someone that has bad habits.

        Like someone said before, if you need to buy a firearm. Make sure you get a Model and Caliber that is on the approved list with that department. Also rent guns at a gun range, Glocks don't fit my hand, but Ruger's and Sig's fit perfect. Its better to spend the money on a weapon that fits your hand, then to spend less and the weapon doesn't fit your hand. Go to a local range and find a gun that fits your hand and try different calibers. Renting gun's is expensive in the short term, but much cheaper in the long run if you find the right gun.
        “Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway” (John Wayne)

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        • #5
          Start with a revolver (.38 caliber). Learn the mechanics of aiming and trigger pull, then graduate to an automatic.
          I’ll die with blue in my veins.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Artic_storm
            Hello All, I am not a LEO yet, I have a bunch of Apps pending.

            I have never fired a gun before and I am looking to purchase my first firearm, I am looking for a reliable gun and easy to handle. I am a huge fan of the HK P2000 but 900$ for a starter gun is a tad extreme.

            So I guess a SIG, Glock, S&W MP just a few options

            Thanks for the help guys,
            At least wait until you are a little bit further along in the hiring process. What one department allows/ mandates in regards to firearms can sometimes differ in another. Remember, some departments even pay for the weapon.

            Also why are you a big fan of the HK, if you've never fired a gun before? Don't let someone else's opinions become your own, get what you shoot well with or what's mandated by the pd.

            good luck

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            • #7
              If you're not big into cleaning and caring for a firearm and only really want something that will go bang each time you pull the trigger with good accuracy, go Glock. No levers or switches and an almost indestructable finish.
              People grow through experience, if they meet life honestly and courageously. This is how character is built.

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              • #8
                +1 to getting instruction
                +1 to revolver for beginner handgun (IMHO: .22lr, steel frame, full size)
                +1 to trying as many quality handguns as possible to see which one fits best

                I'd also recommend a quality .22lr or pellet pistol as a beginner handgun over any center fire round due to mild recoil, low ammo cost, and reduced noise. IMHO, starting with a medium or large caliber handgun can cause poor shooting habits that are difficult to break.

                If/when you do get a duty handgun, practice dry-firing (no ammo around, in safe direction).

                Good luck.

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                • #9
                  I have to agree with getting yourself an nice .22LR pistol to get started. You can learn all the basics with a relatively low cost firearm with ammo that is DIRT cheap. The more ammo you have the more you're going to shoot. The more you shoot, the better you'll get.
                  Originally posted by kontemplerande
                  Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

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                  • #10
                    first gun

                    I would have to say that if you are applying for LEO jobs, I would find out what those departments carry. I shoot IDPA pistol compatitions, and prefer a 1911. I am a reserve cadet with my local SO, and they issue Glock 22 to the full timers.....so guess what I bought. (had to get used to gripping, and fireing an inferior gun )
                    Do the right thing, even when no one is watching

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                    • #11
                      How accurate is a pellet pistol compared to a regular handgun like say a beretta 92?

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                      • #12
                        I'm going to go with my perennial suggestion of a Ruger MKII or MKIII. Browning Buckmark is another fine contender at a similar price point. Get you some .22 and blow through a couple bricks of ammo, get used to holding and squeezing without flinching.
                        **Not a LEO**

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                        • #13
                          I disagree with some of the opinons here.

                          If you're going to carry a self loader in the end, get a self loader. There is nothing about pistol shooting that cannot be learned properly on a self loader than can be learned with revolver.

                          There is also nothing about pistol shooting that cannot be learned properly with a combat caliber that can be learned with a 22LR.

                          Shooting a 40S&W or 45ACP pistol with 5.5~12 lb trigger makes shooting 22LR with 2~3 lb trigger easy, but it won't work the other way around.

                          It's just wasted time and money as far as I am concerned. I was near top score in shooting during academy, but I never shot a 22LR. I was good at shooting 40S&W Glock 22, because I've shot 40S&W.
                          Last edited by GrayBlue; 06-06-2009, 05:54 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Have to agree with GrayBlue. I didn't have the funds to start with a .22 revolver and work upward.

                            I started with a .40, and I still shoot a .40.
                            Last edited by Till; 06-06-2009, 11:18 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TimK View Post
                              I'm going to go with my perennial suggestion of a Ruger MKII or MKIII. Browning Buckmark is another fine contender at a similar price point. Get you some .22 and blow through a couple bricks of ammo, get used to holding and squeezing without flinching.


                              +1.



                              Two great guns there.


                              And with the price of ammo these days, learning on a .22 is a lot cheaper then a 9mm or anything else.


                              A .22 revolver wouldn't be bad, but I think a grown man would have no problem learning on a .22 semi-auto, that's what I'd start with.


                              Getting some instruction is a great idea also. And you'd be surprised, years and years from now, you'll still have that .22 you started out with and someday you will most likely start your own children on it.

                              .

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