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AR15 Round Chambered in the rack ?

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  • AR15 Round Chambered in the rack ?

    Hey, quick question. Just got issued an AR15 for on duty use. Is there any concerns about having a round chambered while it is in the rack (vertical rack between driver/passenger seat) ? Any chances of a AD, slamfire, etc. ?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Personally, I wouldn't keep one chambered. Full mag in it, though.

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    • #3
      Rifle and shotgun are two-handed weapons. Since you have to put two hands on it anyway, chambering a round is no big deal... unlike a handgun.

      Follow your department policy, but absent other direction I'd carry it in the rifle version of cruiser ready: mag in the well, chamber empty, bolt forward, safety off.
      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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      • #4
        Originally posted by VETTE277 View Post
        Hey, quick question. Just got issued an AR15 for on duty use. Is there any concerns about having a round chambered while it is in the rack (vertical rack between driver/passenger seat) ? Any chances of a AD, slamfire, etc. ?

        Thanks
        Didn't you go through a qualification / instruction course prior to having the firearm issued for duty?
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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        • #5
          I would NOT chamber a round for vehicle rack storage. Your dept handed you an AR and doesn't have an AR policy?
          If your taking/have the time to get the rifle out of the rack, you have time to take the .2 seconds to pull the charging handle. Also, then you know its loaded. If you leave it in the rack for 10 months and then get a call where you have to use it, common sense/good procedure would be to press check it anyways (pull the charging handle to the rear slightly to ensure a round is chambered.) Plus there is the "floating firing pin" aspect. The idea is if a round is chambered and you hit a huge bump it COULD possibly/maybe 1 in a million times, strike the primer hard enough to fire the round (probably would take the combination of a light/weak primer as well). Take your AR bolt carrier group and shake it (out of the weapon). You will hear/see the firing pin moving. The US Army doesn't even chamber rounds in M4s when mounted in vehicles on mounted combat missions. Just, "amber status", safety on, bolt forward, mag in, chamber empty. Rack when you exit the vehicle. Dismounted patrol is different.
          Last edited by sapper324; 08-02-2014, 08:42 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sapper324 View Post
            Plus there is the "floating firing pin" aspect. The idea is if a round is chambered and you hit a huge bump it COULD possibly/maybe 1 in a million times, strike the primer hard enough to fire the round (probably would take the combination of a light/weak primer as well).
            It would be fun to come up with an explanation for the hole punched in the roof of the car. Hail storm?

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            • #7
              I appreciate the responses. My agency did have a great rifle familiarization course, and this was covered as well. But, I wanted to see from experienced AR users what your take was on this. As we know, agency policy doesn't necessarily coincide with the most practical/tactical doctrine. Looks like cruiser ready is the preferred carry method, which makes sense. I was thinking there may be a benefit having it chambered and ready to go, but if you are in situation where you don't have the split second to chamber a round, you should probably be bailing out and deploying your handgun anyway.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by VETTE277 View Post
                As we know, agency policy doesn't necessarily coincide with the most practical/tactical doctrine.
                Although your statement is generally true, following your agency policy will keep you from getting thrown under the bus when stuff goes dreadfully wrong.

                “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

                Miyamoto Musashi

                “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

                George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
                  Although your statement is generally true, following your agency policy will keep you from getting thrown under the bus when stuff goes dreadfully wrong.

                  And your car looking like bugs bunny was stuck inside is definitely one of those areas where you'd be tied up and thrown right under.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
                    Although your statement is generally true, following your agency policy will keep you from getting thrown under the bus when stuff goes dreadfully wrong.
                    On top of that ----------------------

                    IF you went through an agency sponsored familiarization course which included agency policy on how to carry the weapon and then decided to disregard that policy you really wouldn't be "thrown under the bus" by your agency if something went wrong.

                    You would be disciplined for failing to follow written AND TRAINED procedures-----and rightfully so.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Free floating firing pin + sudden impact = discharged rifle.
                      I miss you, Dave.
                      http://www.odmp.org/officer/20669-of...david-s.-moore

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                      • #12
                        As we know, agency policy doesn't necessarily coincide with the most practical/tactical doctrine.
                        ...but it's what you do or risk losing your job and your shirt in the subsequent lawsuit.
                        "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                        "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My first agency allowed us to buy and carry our own rifles, but didn't say how we should carry them (didn't address safety on/off, loaded/unloaded, or even where in the vehicle or how stored). One guy kept his M4 with a full mag and the chamber locked up. Didn't seem like a good idea to me...
                          Originally posted by Ceridwen
                          Just one would be stingy of me, I'd have to get two. For the children.

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                          • #14
                            The standard pretty much anywhere is patrol ready: Loaded mag, closed bolt, and empty chamber. It's not your primary weapon, you have plenty of time to get a round in the chamber when you go to deploy your rifle. On top of that, it's not impossible to bump the selector onto fire while removing it from the rack and since there is nothing protecting the trigger guard the risk of an AD is possible.

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                            • #15
                              If you've got time to retrieve the rifle from the rack, there's time to chamber a round. Keep it car ready

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