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Found my 1st squib round! Guess where it was

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  • Found my 1st squib round! Guess where it was

    This week my admin. gave us all new/fresh duty ammo to replace the ammo that was in our weapons/mags. We all go to the range as usual to burn up the old ammo.

    Get to the line...Draw my Glock 22(.40 S&W) and fire.....Something felt odd, felt like I was shooting a .22, there was no recoil....And it sounded like a .22 firing. I looked, and saw the round actually dropping and hit the ground about 5 ft. below where I was aiming.


    The squib round was the ROUND IN THE TUBE! Good thing I didn't need THAT bullet on duty!


    I dissembled the Glock, everything looked fine. Shot the rest of the ammo without an issue. Found the brass of the squid, looked normal, no cracking, no unburnt powder, etc. We were using Federal Premium "law enforcement" rounds by the way...

    This was a wake up call for sure, made my mind race of being on a traffic stop and needing that round, and watching it bounce off the pavement.

  • #2
    Maybe it was just tired. You should always give your ammo 15 minute breaks and an hour lunch.

    Comment


    • #3
      Underpowered rounds are scary stuff. For everything else, you tap\rack\bang. For potential squibs, you best just start reaching for your backup.

      One interesting note about HK firearms: they aren't my favorite, but I love the fact that their barrels are built to handle a live round being fired into a stuck squib without it resulting in a near-face explosion.

      Comment


      • #4
        How long had it been since you swapped ammo? Did the old duty ammo ever get wet, repeatedly chambered, got lots of solvent or oil on it?

        Stuff like this is why we swap everyone's duty ammo once a year. We had issues before we started doing this with duds.

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        • #5
          Never had a problem with duty ammo. Back in the wheelgun days, I had reloaded wadcutters stick in the forcing cone and, on one occasion, stop halfway out the muzzle.

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          • #6
            I have a large collection of bad factory ammo:
            Bullet in backwards, no primer, no primer and no flash hole, a pin inside the case, so the round could never be chambered (it pushes out against the wall of the case), and my favorite:
            12 gauge slug round - case, primer, powder charge, wad, roll crimp - just no slug!

            All of the above were 1st class LE ammo, from all the major manufacturers. But if you make several million of anything, and have a 0.0001 error rate, that is still a lot of bad ammo!

            Check your ammo, and the range staff should try some rounds from each case.
            "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
            John Stuart Mill

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            • #7
              I also swapped out duty rounds for quals in the past week. My horror story is this: I went to unload the 3 mags from my duty rig and found all three to have weak springs...I unloaded the top 3-4 rounds and the rest were rattling around in the bottom. Strangely enough I had just replaced those 3 springs about a month ago and had probably put 300 rounds through them without incident. I can't even imagine having ALL my mags fail in a fight. Lesson learned: more off duty range time!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Southwestern cop View Post
                I also swapped out duty rounds for quals in the past week. My horror story is this: I went to unload the 3 mags from my duty rig and found all three to have weak springs...I unloaded the top 3-4 rounds and the rest were rattling around in the bottom. Strangely enough I had just replaced those 3 springs about a month ago and had probably put 300 rounds through them without incident. I can't even imagine having ALL my mags fail in a fight. Lesson learned: more off duty range time!!
                What were you shooting?
                Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you utilize too much oil, CLP, or other fluids to lubricate or prevent corrosion of your duty weapon, some of that material has the potential of entering the chambered cartridge via the primer pocket and causing contamination.

                  In addition to paying a lot of attention to how much lubricant/preservative is used, I use a clean rag and/or a q-tip to dry out the open areas of the striker/firing pin and the face of the slide where it comes into contact with the base of the cartridge. It doesn't hurt to thoroughly wipe down each cartridge chambered or placed into the magazine with a clean/dry cloth after washing one's hands (if you've just cleaned and reassembled the weapon) too!
                  "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HI629 View Post
                    What were you shooting?
                    I was shooting a Glock 22. Those particular mags had brand new springs but the rest of the magazine is almost 5 years old. I just threw them away and went to my 3 spares until I can get a few more in the rotation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Southwestern cop View Post
                      I was shooting a Glock 22. Those particular mags had brand new springs but the rest of the magazine is almost 5 years old. I just threw them away and went to my 3 spares until I can get a few more in the rotation.
                      Really strange for OEM Glock magazines. Usually changing the followers and springs ensure the magazines function properly. Cycling the magazines is what usually wears springs down. I have several magazines going on 10 years that still have the original springs. Those magazines aren't used as frequently as my other magazines.
                      Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yah I really don't have a good explanation for what caused it. They were clean, new springs, proper ammo, no aftermarket base plates. I just got rid of them because no matter what I did, I would never trust those three mags again. Better to start fresh and not stress about it.

                        Comment

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