Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the maximum amount of time that Duty Ammo is good for?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I shot with shotgun and pistol ammo that was manufactured in the '80s and did just as well as just off the shelf ammo.

    Comment


    • #17
      I don't have a whole lot to add that others haven't already said.

      Just yo echo, I've fired decades old ammo without a problem.

      As far as duty ammo, when I first started as a cop, I had to buy my own duty ammo. So I got a couple boxes of speer gold dots. Kept them as my duty ammo for years. When I finally got a job at a department that knew $60 a year for duty ammo wasn't unreasonable, I fired off my old gold dots and didn't have a single hiccup. They were roughly 4 years old at them.

      By it's nature, everything in a bullet cartridge is pretty stable stuff. So unless it gets wet or otherwise contaminated, it should be fine for years.
      Last edited by Dingo990; 08-20-2011, 11:56 PM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Bighead View Post
        I would personally say you need to invest in at least 60 rounds of personal practice every quarter at a minimum. If you're concerned about duty ammo, you can shoot your and this training cycle will replace all your personal duty ammunition every six months. This shouldn't cost you more than about $150 every six months ($25 per month). Kinda like those commercials on TV, "For less than the price of a cup of coffee..."

        For me, cycling the ammo isn't the issue as much as getting reps on your rifle. If you carry your ammo in a reasonable environment and keep it dry, then its lifespan is years, and you can train with cheaper ammo. This means you could spend less, or shoot more.

        Also, you don't need to cycle your magazines, the springs don't need to rest. A bunch of physics terms like stored energy, elastic limit, Hooke's Law, and spring tension could explain why, but just trust that a quality magazine spring is made to run loaded. Repeated use over time is much harder on them than leaving them loaded. You're going to have to shoot a lot to load and unload your mags enough that you need to worry about it.
        I'm with this. No need to practice with your duty ammo as long as you can find a good quality FMJ that's the same grain.

        It's all about the right environment you store your equipment. Extreme temperatures and humidity seems to be bad IMO.

        Comment


        • #19
          I have been on my current department just under 15 years now. I still have quite a few duty rounds that were issued to me. Thus far I have not had a problem. We qual twice a year and we are welcome to go to the range even more but we have to supply our own ammo for that.
          Prov 17:17 A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

          Comment


          • #20
            I took some standard duty rounds of different calibers and put them into a cup with a 1/4" of Breakfree CLP in the bottom. I'm going to see how this affects the rounds and if they still fire.

            The only things to watch out for, to my knowledge, are bullet/crimp "creep" and excessive exposure to oil and water. If you work in a rainy environment, it should be at least a weekly practice to clean your gun and maybe wipe down your ammo more often with a clean cloth. When you have to unload your gun, don't always load the same round back into the chamber. You can take a Sharpie and put a mark on the rounds you've chambered to make sure you're not constantly slamming the same round into the chamber. Over time this can cause the bullet to creep into the casing and could potentially cause a malfunction.

            We qualify on a quarterly basis and shoot our duty ammo at the first qualification of the year. We shoot practice ammo for the other quals.
            Last edited by American50; 08-21-2012, 03:59 AM.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by American50 View Post
              I took some standard duty rounds of different calibers and put them into a cup with a 1/4" of Breakfree CLP in the bottom. I'm going to see how this affects the rounds and if they still fire.
              I am not sure I would consider this a safe test.

              The CLP is likely to:

              A) Ruin the primer, so the round won't fire
              or
              B) Seep into the round, and partially contaminate the powder inside. This means that some random amount between 0-100% of the powder will actually burn when you fire the round. This could result in some unburnt powder in the barrel, or it could result in a bullet stuck in the middle of your bore.

              If you got a good way to test it, more power to ya. But as for me, I'll just keep my ammo dry

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Fëanor View Post
                I am not sure I would consider this a safe test.

                The CLP is likely to:

                A) Ruin the primer, so the round won't fire
                or
                B) Seep into the round, and partially contaminate the powder inside. This means that some random amount between 0-100% of the powder will actually burn when you fire the round. This could result in some unburnt powder in the barrel, or it could result in a bullet stuck in the middle of your bore.

                If you got a good way to test it, more power to ya. But as for me, I'll just keep my ammo dry
                You made a good point; I can see how it may not be the safest idea. My intent behind this test is to determine if duty ammo is susceptible to failure after excessive exposure to penetrating cleaners. I'm sure any cleaner could eventually work its way into a primer or through a weak crimp. I'm more or less curious and want to see if it goes "BANG" or "ffshhhhh..ZIIING"

                Comment


                • #23
                  We shoot our duty ammo up once a year.

                  The ammo you buy for your rifle today will still be good when you retire.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    We are issued enough to fill three magazines plus one for the chamber. We're offered 4 qualification shoots each year (only one mandatory) and every so often the firearms guy tells us to sghoot our duty ammo. It's then replaced. I do not know the interval. I shoot every quarter with a different pistol so I can't keep track. He only will issue enough duty ammo for one pistol, the rest is on me.

                    I've had the same shotgun ammo for eight years (and I'm sure its a lot older than that. The previous user just turned it over to me.) . Rifle ammo is only 5 years old.
                    I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any threat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within.

                    Douglas MacArthur

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Quality ammo will last for decades if you keep it in a cool and DRY place. You should rotate your mags. Don't risk your life with a magazine failure. You should also take them apart and clean them the same way you clean your weapon. Just not as often unless you roll around in the mud.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Look on the box for the "Best used by" date. Once you open the ammo it will start to get stale. If you keep it too long it might not stop the bad guy fast enough. I would change my ammo every 3 months or so, just like changing the oil in your car. Much of the ammo has preservatives added that will allow you to stretch this out a little. 4 months is my max.

                        PS

                        If you don't believe me just watch some of Jerry Miculek's videos.
                        Stupid has no color or race, everyone can participate.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          PS

                          I forgot my tip about polishing the ammo. Get a can of WD40 and spray the box down liberally. Let this sit for about 1 hour then polish to a wonderful shine.



                          Ok, this one is BS for those that will get their knickers in a twist.
                          Stupid has no color or race, everyone can participate.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by IAM Rand View Post
                            Look on the box for the "Best used by" date. Once you open the ammo it will start to get stale. If you keep it too long it might not stop the bad guy fast enough. I would change my ammo every 3 months or so, just like changing the oil in your car. Much of the ammo has preservatives added that will allow you to stretch this out a little. 4 months is my max.

                            PS


                            If you don't believe me just watch some of Jerry Miculek's videos.

                            Would you send your "outdated" ammo to me as you replace it? I can dispose of it safely for you. I can do so with 9mm, .38 special, .357 Mag, 40SW, 45 ACP, .22 Mag, 45 Colt, .410, .223/5.56, 12 ga and .243 Win.


                            ya know what? When Grandad gave his Nazi-marked Hi-Power, it had a mag of 1940's vintage 9mm ball in it. Shot quite well.
                            I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any threat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within.

                            Douglas MacArthur

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by David Hineline View Post
                              Take a paper clip, bend it sharply once, leave it way for 100yrs. Bend it back and forth 100 times and it breaks, load/unload/load/unload is what breaks magazine springs they do not need to rest.

                              I am still using magazines that were loaded in VietNam and the ammo and mags feed just fine.

                              What you need more ammo for is practice with the weapon platform.
                              Are you the guy who goes out and shoots one mag a year and they always work ?? Mags loaded a long long time ago ? I knew there was one BCR who posted about that.

                              Bill
                              Just pay your dues, and be quiet :-)

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 9550 users online. 256 members and 9294 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 08:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X