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Range video. Any advice?

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  • Range video. Any advice?

    Well, thank you for very much for your input on my previous thread.

    I went for more shooting today, and here is a video of it.

    I am the person with black top. Any advice on how to hold the gun, stance, etc?


    Here is the video:
    Sorry for the video quality. I had to convert the videos to the right format which caused a significant decrease on the quality. I have HD versions on my computer, but my editing software does not support them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFek5JD3hKA

    Thank you
    "Get a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life"

  • #2
    Erm.....very hard personally to tell without seeing a full view, stance, arm positions, etc.
    Try and practice reloads, stepping off the line after firing three rounds, scanning with the weapon. Then take a course if you can...if this is all old hat to you apologies.
    "Well, I never had an invisible friend when I was young, but I'm sure that if I did, it would be Constable Smiley."

    Comment


    • #3
      A little long, but your asked.

      Watch this and critique yourself http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48

      I watched this video several years ago and it greatly improved my shooting, almost over night. I did everything in the video as TJ did. Slowly at first to make sure I was doing it right and I quickly found myself progressing.

      Shoulders squared up to your target, feet shoulder width apart, strong side foot about a half step (maybe a little more) back, weight on the balls of your feet, knees slightly bent, lean forward slightly at the waist, upper back muscles relaxed, shoulders forward, both arms fully extended just shy of lock out forming a triangle (Isosceles... hint, hint.) with your chest and arms. When looking at your shooting position from the side, your elbows should be on the same plane.

      Good to see that your using a thumbs forward grip, but don't be afraid to let your thumbs ride the slide. It looks like you might be taking care to ensure your thumbs are not contacting the slide at all. Get the web of your support hand as high into the back strap as possible, then get your support hand contacting the trigger and the meaty portion of your support thumb filling the void in your grip, then let your thumbs fall where they may. The smooth slide of semi-autos won't do anything to your thumbs as it glides by. You won't even notice it.

      I'm not positive, but it looks like the index finger of your support hand might not be contacting the trigger guard. Trying doing so to get the best possible 360* grip. Another small thing, it looks like you might be applying a little too much pressure laterally between your support hand finger tips and support hand palm. Too tight of a grip here can lead to your support hand drifting out of position durign recoil. Instead focus more on firm pressure to the rear with this hand. It will help with shot-to shot grip consistency and equal pressure around your strong hand.

      And the most important aspect, which unfortunatley the video does not show, is your trigger control. Smooth press to the rear, hold to the rear through recoil, let out slowly just enough to feel the *click* of the reset, then another smooth press to the rear, wash, rinse, repeat. In any planned string of fire, your index finger should only make contact with the trigger face once, not loosing contact with it after each shot, then coming back to it.

      I can't tell from the vid, but focus only on the front sight during slow paced fire. Also, you should have a continuous sight picture during the entire string of fire, only interupted briefly by the muzzle rise during recoil. Do not look up to see where that last shot went as you'll be chasing holes and expanding your group. Additionally, at the distance your shooting the mechanical off-set between bore and sight means you'll likely not be able to see where your round hit. Just keep the exact same sight picture for the last shot as you did for the first shot and you will be pleased with the results.

      Keep up the good work!
      Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by nadler20 View Post
        A little long, but your asked.

        Watch this and critique yourself http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48

        I watched this video several years ago and it greatly improved my shooting, almost over night. I did everything in the video as TJ did. Slowly at first to make sure I was doing it right and I quickly found myself progressing.

        Shoulders squared up to your target, feet shoulder width apart, strong side foot about a half step (maybe a little more) back, weight on the balls of your feet, knees slightly bent, lean forward slightly at the waist, upper back muscles relaxed, shoulders forward, both arms fully extended just shy of lock out forming a triangle (Isosceles... hint, hint.) with your chest and arms. When looking at your shooting position from the side, your elbows should be on the same plane.

        Good to see that your using a thumbs forward grip, but don't be afraid to let your thumbs ride the slide. It looks like you might be taking care to ensure your thumbs are not contacting the slide at all. Get the web of your support hand as high into the back strap as possible, then get your support hand contacting the trigger and the meaty portion of your support thumb filling the void in your grip, then let your thumbs fall where they may. The smooth slide of semi-autos won't do anything to your thumbs as it glides by. You won't even notice it.

        I'm not positive, but it looks like the index finger of your support hand might not be contacting the trigger guard. Trying doing so to get the best possible 360* grip. Another small thing, it looks like you might be applying a little too much pressure laterally between your support hand finger tips and support hand palm. Too tight of a grip here can lead to your support hand drifting out of position durign recoil. Instead focus more on firm pressure to the rear with this hand. It will help with shot-to shot grip consistency and equal pressure around your strong hand.

        And the most important aspect, which unfortunatley the video does not show, is your trigger control. Smooth press to the rear, hold to the rear through recoil, let out slowly just enough to feel the *click* of the reset, then another smooth press to the rear, wash, rinse, repeat. In any planned string of fire, your index finger should only make contact with the trigger face once, not loosing contact with it after each shot, then coming back to it.

        I can't tell from the vid, but focus only on the front sight during slow paced fire. Also, you should have a continuous sight picture during the entire string of fire, only interupted briefly by the muzzle rise during recoil. Do not look up to see where that last shot went as you'll be chasing holes and expanding your group. Additionally, at the distance your shooting the mechanical off-set between bore and sight means you'll likely not be able to see where your round hit. Just keep the exact same sight picture for the last shot as you did for the first shot and you will be pleased with the results.

        Keep up the good work!
        Man I love this. Thank you very much. I will follow these one by one, and will continue to report back until I get this right.

        Right now, the tip of my index finger hurts. The trigger safety is a bit pointy for me, plus the trigger is a bit heavy too, so after hundreds of rounds, my finger tip hurts. I will shoot again next weekend. Will report back sir. Thank you!!
        "Get a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life"

        Comment


        • #5
          TJ is one of my favorite shooters, nadler, and that's a great video.
          Eat Meat, Build Mass!

          www.centralfloridaammo.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh and one more thing, DRY FIRE! You can do it at home, it's free, and great for perfecting that trigger press. This is a good drill http://pistol-training.com/archives/118 for starters and you can progress to setting your sights up on small and/or distant objects around the house to bring a simulated target into the mix. Think aim small, miss small.
            Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity

            Comment


            • #7
              http://www.predatortactical.com/cart...se_detail&id=5

              Matt Burkett's dry fire training drills page is also an awesome dry fire resource. There's a par timer with target for draw at the beep stuff, mag changes or anything else you can use a par timer for. There's also a sight tracking and indexing utility. Pretty darn neat, and the best part about them is that they're free! Ben Stoeger's 15 Minute Dry Fire Training Program http://benstoeger.myonlineplace.org/...d=46&Itemid=64 is also an excellent tool for building fundamental skills quickly.
              Eat Meat, Build Mass!

              www.centralfloridaammo.com

              Comment

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