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cleaning cosmoline out of sks

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  • cleaning cosmoline out of sks

    I just bought a yugo sks, it's pretty sweet! All original and came with an extra ati synthetic stock and two tapco tan 20 round clips. But I was suprised when I took it out of the box and my hands were covered in what seemed like vaseline! I did a short research and found out it was cosmoline. what is the best way to clean it out?

  • #2
    Reason for Editing.
    Last edited by lazycop; 02-24-2010, 12:04 AM.
    Work smarter not harder!

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    • #3
      As lazycop mentioned, there are many ways that people use to get rid of the ever wonderful cosmoline on surplus firearms.

      Some people claim hands down that putting cat-litter inside of a trashbag and putting the gun in the trashbag and leaving it out in the sun for a whole day does the trick.

      But the method I found that does the job just fine is, also mentioned by lazycop, hot water.

      Get a couple of buckets and completely strip your gun down. Take hot water and put it in a bucket and put those parts in there and let them soak for a while. While those are soaking, I then move on to the reciever, stock, and barrel. Using a couple of old tooth brushes, I use hot water to loosen up the cosmo and then scrub it out with the tooth brushes.

      After your parts have soaked and you pull them out, do the same thing. Use old tooth brushes or brushes and scrub them the best you can.

      Especially make sure you get the gas piston and the gas tube well cleared out!

      The tooth brushes work great for areas such as the chamber and down into the mag and so forth.

      Once you've worked the cosmo out to the best of your ability, let the parts dry and reassemble.

      You will, after shooting, find that annoying substance coming to the surface again. You can't always get ALL of the cosmo out. Some of it will just work it's own way out eventually. Just make sure you clean it up as it shows.

      If you still need some help, there are a couple of great surplus firearm forums around, I'd hop on there and do a search.
      Last edited by MVD; 10-30-2009, 06:14 PM.

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      • #4
        Carburator cleaner. I'm too lazy to use the boiling water method. Cheap walmart stuff would suffice. Do not get it on the wood. For that I softened it up with a hair dryer and just kept wiping it off with paper towels.

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        • #5
          Carb cleaner, a couple patches down the barrel, then shoot as much ammo as fast as you can.

          AK's have the same issue. They are dripping with cosmo when they come out of the crate.
          "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - George Orwell
          8541tactical.com - Ammo Wallets

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          • #6
            I found that a rag, toothbrush, and Hoppes#9 works well. Or a good soaking in mineral spirits. Comes right off. If you use mineral spirits make sure to rub a light coat of oil o the metal since it will be bone dry.

            I use oven cleaning foam on the stocks/wood. Let it sit for a day then with a lot of hot water and a plastic scrub brush start scrubbing and cleaning. Let the stock sit for a couple days to dry. Then w/ some fine steel wool or very fine sandpaper lightly smooth out the wood (this way it doesn't ruin the cartouches as well). Then I put some linseed oil on it a hand rub it in. Wipe off excess. Put a couple coats on it using the above technique over the next couple days.

            I find it comes out very nice. I know it sounds like a lot of work but, I enjoy it and sometimes the wood on these old military rifles turn out to be very attractive.

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            • #7
              I found that a rag, toothbrush, and Hoppes#9 works well. Or a good soaking in mineral spirits. Comes right off. If you use mineral spirits make sure to rub a light coat of oil o the metal since it will be bone dry.

              I use oven cleaning foam on the stocks/wood. Let it sit for a day then with a lot of hot water and a plastic scrub brush start scrubbing and cleaning. Let the stock sit for a couple days to dry. Then w/ some fine steel wool or very fine sandpaper lightly smooth out the wood (this way it doesn't ruin the cartouches as well). Then I put some linseed oil on it a hand rub it in. Wipe off excess. Put a couple coats on it using the above technique over the next couple days.

              I find it comes out very nice. I know it sounds like a lot of work but, I enjoy it and sometimes the wood on these old military rifles turn out to be very attractive.

              Comment


              • #8
                I found that a rag, toothbrush, and Hoppes#9 works well. Or a good soaking in mineral spirits. Comes right off. If you use mineral spirits make sure to rub a light coat of oil o the metal since it will be bone dry.

                I use oven cleaning foam on the stocks/wood. Let it sit for a day then with a lot of hot water and a plastic scrub brush start scrubbing and cleaning. Let the stock sit for a couple days to dry. Then w/ some fine steel wool or very fine sandpaper lightly smooth out the wood (this way it doesn't ruin the cartouches as well). Then I put some linseed oil on it a hand rub it in. Wipe off excess. Put a couple coats on it using the above technique over the next couple days.

                I find it comes out very nice. I know it sounds like a lot of work but, I enjoy it and sometimes the wood on these old military rifles turn out to be very attractive.

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                • #9
                  Cripes!!!! I better lay off the coffee. Sorry about that.

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                  • #10
                    http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu23.htm

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                    • #11
                      I was going to ask if a rag, toothbrush, and Hoppes#9 would work well. Or a good soaking in mineral spirits. I have heard that if you use mineral spirits make sure to rub a light coat of oil on the metal since it will be bone dry.

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                      • #12
                        I've heard of (and be very careful) gasoline. A good soaking
                        One Shot, One Kill. Anything else is just pu(ff)y!

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