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Duty Ammo Life Expectancy?

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    BPD_126
    Forum Member

  • BPD_126
    replied
    * Every time you cycle a round into the chamber, the nose of the bullet hits the feed ramp causing a slight denting of the hollowpoint bullet mouth. The size of the dent depends on the weapon feed ramp design and the shape of the hollowpoint bullet nose. If the bullet nose hits against the feed ramp enough times, with multiple re-chambering of the same round, you could get enough of a dent to cause a miss-feed and/or a jam, rendering the weapon temporarily out of service, if only for a critical moment.
    * Every time you cycle a round from the magazine into the chamber, you are making a small gouge or dent in the extractor groove and/ or case rim. With time continued recycling can cause a weapon malfunction, depending on the design of the weapon.
    * Some weapons have sharper extractor tips than others. High extractor tension coupled with a sharp extractor tip can increase the case damage. In addition, the shape of the ejector and the force of the manual ejection of the loaded round can damage a case rim.
    This is exactly why I always change out "the first bullet in." I'll mix em up from time to time. My Glock is pretty bad about showing the grooves on the case. The duty SigP220ST .45's bad about bending the HP of the Speer Gold Dot as well as the case marking I mentioned before.

    Leave a comment:

  • School Cop
    The .40 Dog Whisperer

  • School Cop
    replied
    I have the blue ribbon, so far.

    My grandfather, who I never met, retired from Sears in the late 60s. He took great advantage of his employee discount before leaving, stocking up on many cases of all kinds of ammo, and a handful of long guns for good measure. My dad used that ammo for deer hunting all while I was growing up, and still shoots some of it occasionally. As far as I know, it's still good.

    My dad's the type to sight in the rifle with 5 or 6 shots at the beginning of the season, and then not see any deer "worth shooting" (he just liked getting out in the woods, I think) for the rest of the year, so I imagine there's still a good bit left.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mitchell_in_CT
    Forum Member

  • Mitchell_in_CT
    replied
    http://www.winchester.com/lawenforce...spx?storyid=62

    7/9/2003
    Common Sense Duty Ammunition Rotation

    On numerous occasions, Police Departments have questioned when they should rotate duty handgun ammunition. Unfortunately, there is no one concrete answer. The answer depends on a number of factors:

    * When ammunition is not damaged by manual cycling through the gun, there generally is no problem and the gun functions just fine. However, you need to think about how many times per week or month you are cycling a loaded round through your gun in loading or unloading. If you cycle the top bullet from the magazine into the chamber each time, you are getting plenty of hits on the bullet nose, extractor groove, and case rim with basically steel on brass. What do you think will give first? If you guessed the brass or the copper, you are correct.
    * Every time you cycle a round into the chamber, the nose of the bullet hits the feed ramp causing a slight denting of the hollowpoint bullet mouth. The size of the dent depends on the weapon feed ramp design and the shape of the hollowpoint bullet nose. If the bullet nose hits against the feed ramp enough times, with multiple re-chambering of the same round, you could get enough of a dent to cause a miss-feed and/or a jam, rendering the weapon temporarily out of service, if only for a critical moment.
    * Every time you cycle a round from the magazine into the chamber, you are making a small gouge or dent in the extractor groove and/ or case rim. With time continued recycling can cause a weapon malfunction, depending on the design of the weapon.
    * Some weapons have sharper extractor tips than others. High extractor tension coupled with a sharp extractor tip can increase the case damage. In addition, the shape of the ejector and the force of the manual ejection of the loaded round can damage a case rim.
    * In addition, duty ammunition is out in the weather -- rain, sleet, snow, with extremes of temperature and humidity. We have seen, many times, bullets in the magazine that have turned green from corrosion. We have even seen bullets in the chamber so corroded, that they had to be removed from the bore with a wooden stick.
    * Some officers over-lubricate their guns, and this lubricant eventually gets on the ammunition. Over time, certain lubricants can get into the casing, contaminating the powder, primer, or both, causing the round to not fire or resulting in a squib.


    What Ammunition Rotation Program Makes Sense for My Department?

    After a careful review of the above information, consider whether or not you load and unload the same round time and time again. If so, you can lessen the wear by putting the chambered round in the bottom of the magazine.

    You should examine the bullet tips, and if they look beat up, segregate the ammunition for practice. You should also consider the weather conditions in your area. If you are in an area of high heat and humidity coupled with salty conditions (near the ocean), inspect your carry ammunition carefully for signs of corrosion or other damage.

    Do you carry an extra box of ammunition in the trunk of the patrol vehicle? Did you know that temperatures in the trunk of a patrol car on a hot day could reach over 150 degrees?

    What about the ammunition in your shotgun? In extremely hot weather, a shotgun loaded with a full magazine tube of shotshells with a strong magazine spring locked in a hot patrol car, can lead to problems. The plastic tube of the shotgun shell may soften under high heat conditions and high magazine spring pressure causing flattened shell mouths, which may prevent the round from chambering.

    Twice a Year -- Duty Ammo Rotation

    If you are operating under average conditions of temperature, humidity, and loading and unloading cycles, you should rotate the duty ammunition you carry on your person or in your patrol vehicle twice a year. If you are operating under more adverse conditions, more frequent ammunition rotation would be advisable.

    Remember, the rotated duty ammunition can be used for practice when either a miss-feed or miss-fire presents no safety issue for the officer. Additional practice to keep skills sharp is inexpensive insurance to protect your safety.

    After considering the information presented in this article, you may want to rotate your duty ammunition more frequently. You may find that doing so is cheap insurance and adds to increased officer safety.

    Leave a comment:

  • Narco
    Waingro...where is he?

  • Narco
    replied
    24 rounds? you still carrying a wheel gun?

    Leave a comment:

  • ZoomByU
    Forum Member

  • ZoomByU
    replied
    wish we were issued duty ammo

    Leave a comment:

  • streetshark394
    Interceptor

  • streetshark394
    replied
    Every year, and shoot the old duty rounds up.

    Leave a comment:

  • LASD6833
    Forum Member

  • LASD6833
    replied
    Originally posted by SCV-Sop View Post
    I would start marking them. I bet they are simply playing round robin with the ammo, and that what was yours is now someone else's.
    Yeah, no kidding! Kinda like marking the bottom of a "fresh" oyster shell.....

    Leave a comment:

  • SCV-Sop
    Forum Member

  • SCV-Sop
    replied
    Originally posted by LASD6833 View Post
    Yearly. They dont let us shoot it, though. It gets turned in.
    I would start marking them. I bet they are simply playing round robin with the ammo, and that what was yours is now someone else's.

    Leave a comment:

  • LASD6833
    Forum Member

  • LASD6833
    replied
    Yearly. They dont let us shoot it, though. It gets turned in.

    Leave a comment:

  • DARE_SUPPORTER
    Click it or Ticket!!!

  • DARE_SUPPORTER
    replied
    my dept qualifies twice a year, so we shoot what we carry each time and get new ammo two times a year. Normally March or April and then again Oct-Nov

    Leave a comment:

  • Nessmuk
    Forum Member

  • Nessmuk
    replied
    Ours is annually.

    I have the guys shoot their last year's issue at the session where I am issuing the new duty ammo, then they get their new load.

    Leave a comment:

  • KenW.
    Caution: Unvetted member.

  • KenW.
    replied
    I was issued ammo in 1990, and fired it for the 2007 fall qualification...

    Leave a comment:

  • towncop
    Fidelity~Zeal~Obedience

  • towncop
    replied
    Yearly here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Surf
    replied
    At every quarterly qualification. Sometimes sooner. No ammo / budget issues.

    Leave a comment:

  • TEX_DEPUTY
    Forum Member

  • TEX_DEPUTY
    replied
    Ours is changed every six months. Yup, all 24 rounds.
    You wanna practice? Go to Walmart and buy your own ammo, my department doesn't supply practice ammo.

    Leave a comment:

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