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  • Range Training Suggestions

    Well, it's been years since I've really had a training regimen at the range. I used to have the luxury of a friend that was a rangemaster at a local department. But, I've since moved away and haven't practiced in a long time. Now that I've got a new pistol and a nice, clean indoor range close to me, I've got no excuses.

    What would be everyone's recommendations for a weekly, Sunday morning range day? Say, 50 rounds per week? What types of drills? Which distance? Maybe some Weaver-stance and kneeling positions?

    Also, assuming that I'm using human silhouettes or the regulation red-dot targets, how are theses scored?

    Basically I'm practicing for self (home) defense and ultimately, on-duty.

    Thanks everyone. There is a wealth of knowledge here and I appreciate the input.

  • #2
    First, work on marksmanship. Second, work on shooting from the holster, or from low-ready. Third, work on speed.

    For marksmanship, ditch the Weaver stance. Go Isosceles. Bend your knees. Lean forward as though you were pushing on something. Feet equidistance apart, under your shoulders. Push the gun forward with both hands, keeping the arms equally straight. Get your head down. Grip the weapon as you would a friend's hand offered in a handshake. Sight alignment, and squeeze. The weapon should surprise you when it fires. Release the trigger slowly until you feel it reset. Repeat as necessary.

    Mix in some dummy rounds, or just do a lot of dry-firing to get rid of any flinching.
    J. Wise

    AR-15 - AK-47 - NFA Trusts - My Pick - Carry Guns - 1911s

    "Some say you can tell how the world stands by the prices of AK-47s...." Chit2001

    Any comments contained herein regarding the legality of firearms, or the application of law, are strictly applicable to Texas. If you live in CA, NY, IL, MA, D.C., etc., the above comments will probably shock you, and should be read for educational purposes only. Most likely nothing I write will apply to you.

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    • #3
      Thank you, Sir. No Weaver stance, huh? I like the idea of dry-firing, especially with a totally new manual of arms for me (the Glock).

      Elbows locked, or slightly straight?
      Last edited by jmb070106; 09-22-2009, 07:10 PM. Reason: Forgot to ask about my elbows...

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      • #4
        Not locked, but straight.
        J. Wise

        AR-15 - AK-47 - NFA Trusts - My Pick - Carry Guns - 1911s

        "Some say you can tell how the world stands by the prices of AK-47s...." Chit2001

        Any comments contained herein regarding the legality of firearms, or the application of law, are strictly applicable to Texas. If you live in CA, NY, IL, MA, D.C., etc., the above comments will probably shock you, and should be read for educational purposes only. Most likely nothing I write will apply to you.

        sigpic

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        • #5
          Can't shoot a gun till it's cleared leather, I have never been an advocate of point shooting as I feel aiming always works, but in IDPA they have been making us do some shooting drills one handed just out of the holster by the hip and I will be damned if I can't hit some close **** just fine. Our local ICE agent can choose to shoot body or head shots like this. I like the body.

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          • #6
            Congratulations on the Glock, my favorite. I find that for on duty applications (depending on your level of experience) you may want to practice drawing from the holster, acquiring the target (finger outside the trigger guard), and then reholstering...

            This is best practiced with a buddy/instructor who can give you commands as to wether the target is a deadly threat or not. When it is a threat then go ahead and bring the finger in the trigger guard and fire.

            ...the reason being is that you fight like you train, and I believe you shouldn't always associate drawing your sidearm to firing your sidearm (see BART shooting). Also while practicing any drills that involve you reloading mid drill I would make sure that reloads only take place when you are completely out of rounds in the pistol. I can't remember how many qualifications required me to change mags while I still had one in the pipe. Why? I won't do that when I fight then why should I train that way? I think that is a bad habit to get into.

            If all this seems like a given to you then just refer to jwise's post... I would also like input/criticism if possible, lord knows the rangemaster from said qualifications did not agree with my opinions.
            Last edited by TwistLockSSD; 09-23-2009, 01:22 AM.
            How can you tell when an old Deputy is on a break or not? You can't

            ***None of the above is representative of, or officially endorsed by any agency what-so-ever***

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            • #7
              You'd better check with the range rules first though. The indoor range here doesn't allow any holster play, kneeling, or anything. Just stand, point, and shoot at no more than one round per second.
              When passenger of foot heave in sight, tootle the horn. Trumpet him melodiously at first, but if he still obstacles your passage then tootle him with vigor.

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              • #8
                I love dry firing for practice. You don't need a range, you don't spend money for rounds and it doesn't teach you to flinch. Of course, you can't do this ALL the time, but it's great practice for sight picture/sight alignment, trigger pull...

                HOWEVER....safety is PARAMOUNT! Check, then check again, and then check again to make sure your chamber is EMPTY before pulling the trigger, and treat the gun as if it were loaded.
                "Character is someone you are when no one is watching."

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                • #9
                  yeah my department started preaching dry firing to our latest academy, one beer, one gun, some dry firing drills and 5 ad's or ng's as i would call them in a month period. no one hurt...thank god. but many floor and wall repairs in apartments.

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                  • #10
                    by the way i dont advocate guns and alcohol....but had to put the whole story in there.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TwistLockSSD View Post
                      ...I would make sure that reloads only take place when you are completely out of rounds in the pistol. I can't remember how many qualifications required me to change mags while I still had one in the pipe. Why? I won't do that when I fight then why should I train that way?
                      So you just fired 14 of your 16 rounds available in the gun, 2 guys are down and the last one is hiding behind cover. You are behind cover and there is a lull in the fight, you are going to sit with only 2 rounds in your gun instead of reloading?

                      I always want as many rounds available, so I will reload anytime I get an opportunity. If I don't get one, I will shoot to lock and perform an emergency reload.

                      ETA: Apparently your firearm instructors simply had you shoot the COF instead of actually training you and explaining why you do the things they want you to do. Sorry to hear that.
                      Last edited by GGG; 09-23-2009, 04:51 PM.

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                      • #12
                        That's a good point GGG. I didn't forsee a potential lull in fighting. I'm glad someone gave me some constructive criticism. Hopefully I would have the presence of mind to know how many rds are left in my mag and when to trade it for a topped off mag vs keeping the original.

                        That would be a good drill in itself... whattaya say? Maybe assisted by a rangemaster? or perhaps after a drill is over (that doesn't require a set amount of rounds to be fired) asking the shooter if he/she knows how many rds are left? Sounds fun to me

                        If I had it my way I would carry 3 factory size 20rd 9mm mags for my Sig 226 that I saw come out recently, then I would never have to reload =P

                        (insert comment that I should use a 40 cal instead)
                        How can you tell when an old Deputy is on a break or not? You can't

                        ***None of the above is representative of, or officially endorsed by any agency what-so-ever***

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                        • #13
                          In a class I attended, they had us reloading after around six rounds while using 10 round mags, and retaining the mags with 4 rounds just in case we needed them. They ran us through some drill where we had to revert to used mags to finish the COF. I now practice that at the range when possible. (Only allowed speedloads during certain hours of range)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TwistLockSSD View Post
                            That's a good point GGG. I didn't forsee a potential lull in fighting. I'm glad someone gave me some constructive criticism. Hopefully I would have the presence of mind to know how many rds are left in my mag and when to trade it for a topped off mag vs keeping the original.
                            When in doubt, change it out. If you shoot a couple of rounds, you'll remember you shot only a couple. If you have shot enough that you are not sure exactly how many, then you are low enough to change mags if you have the opportunity.

                            The nice thing about Glock, is that the weight changes enough between a full mag and empty mag that you can tell by the weight that you need to change a magazines.

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                            • #15
                              Range suggestions

                              A couple things I would recommend. I always train our officers to move laterally EVERY time rounds go downrange. A quick sidestep left or right as you draw. Gets you inside the suspect's OODA loop and doesn't sacrifice time if its done as you draw. I would also do some close work, like arms distance from the target. Most people think its pointless as you are so close but at three or four feet moving the muzzle only an inch means you miss the target. A drill we do is weapon holstered in interview stance in front of target. On command push target with your off hand (create distance, distraction) as you draw weapon. This is an elbow up, elbow down draw. Fire a couple rounds from here as you back up to create distance. Those are just a couple drills we do.

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