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  • Duty Belt injuries?

    I have been asked by my sister-in-law to see if there is anyone with 'long term' injuries from wearing duty belt's jammed with equipment. 'Mary' is a now retired Deputy Sheriff from a Northern CA county. She does not have access to a computer and has asked me to reach out and ask the law enforcement community...

    I've done some research and found back injuries from very heavy duty belts (CA Highway Patrol changed their gear to a lighter material belt...) but another factor seems to be affecting very thin/skinny personnel. (Those of us with some weight provide padding for where the belts sits - especially when riding in a squad car for some length of time...)

    Does anyone know of any case studies I can get copies of?

    Thanks in advance!

  • #2
    You have probably 28 lbs in weight if not more and it's a struggle everyday to wear the thing. I know a few departments use the suspenders whivh look like crap but the distribute the weight better.

    My back is still killing me and I have not worn a full belt in years just a gun and cuffs & spare magazines.

    Have her ask any chiropractor for info.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bodie
      You have probably 28 lbs in weight if not more and it's a struggle everyday to wear the thing. I know a few departments use the suspenders whivh look like crap but the distribute the weight better.

      My back is still killing me and I have not worn a full belt in years just a gun and cuffs & spare magazines.

      Have her ask any chiropractor for info.

      I agree with Bodie. We have a number of Veteran Officers that are having back problems, not necessarily from the gear belt, but also from sitting in the squad car and other activities. Our department use outer vest carriers that can be customize to have pockets and pouches to carry some of your belt gear (i.e. magazines, radio, baton, etc. and it distribute the weight better.

      But as Bodie said, see a chiropractor and another you got to keep in mind is your body posture - sitting and standing.
      "Don't be an Idiot - Use your common sense!" - Freakapino

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      • #4
        For this reason I do not wear any gear past my hips. Everything is in the front and to the sides. Take a look at this article:

        http://www.iwitts.com/html/sam_brown...__a_look_.html

        Even though it is from an organization for women, the article is quite relevant to men as well.
        Looks like someone took their stupid pills today.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have also heard of departments out in the Pacific Northwest that use suspenders.I've been in the L.E. community for over 6yrs and I too never had back problems.There are good days and then there are crap days,if your dept has a good medical plan use it and find a good Dr. and get some massages, I find it really helps out alot . Oh! And one more thing, don't buy cheap duty gear. You really do get what you pay for!

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          • #6
            "Tactical"-legholsters have helped some here.. The seats in patrol cars could be far better, ever noticed your weapons magazine pushing the seat? (and make your back twist...). Also carrying your equipment in (tactical?) vests might help..

            I quess the main thing against " tac-holsters " and " tac-vests " comes from fellow "LEOs" , not the citizens. The citizen cannot see provocative the way HOW you curry your weapon, IF they get provocated, it

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            • #7
              "Tactical" leg holsters are slower than a belt holster, simply because your hand has further to travel. And all the ones I am familiar with are impossible to draw from while seated. I'll stay with a belt holster, but your results may vary. You are only betting your life.
              "A man who has nothing which he cares about more than he does about his personal safety is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the existing of better men than himself."
              John Stuart Mill

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              • #8
                Duty Belt

                Thanks to all for your replies.. SIGman1 has put me on to an area I will investigate further - anyone experience problems from sitting in a squad car too long and have 'issues' with either circulation problems or such?

                Jt

                Comment


                • #9
                  Back problems from Duty Belt

                  I have a PPT on this if you want a copy contact me directly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have only been on two years but I am trying to take the advice from all of you and others in my department. I do not have anything on the back of my belt. All my gear is on the front semi circle of my belt.

                    I have going left to right -

                    OC, radio, ASP, side handle ring (if baton is neccessary), double mag pouch, key keeper, double cuff case, gun

                    many many officers shove a cuff case, asp, oc behind their gun (handle of gun) to keep it off the small of their back. This seems quite dangerous to me. I don't want to have to fumble between tools or cases when poop hits the fan and I need that gun out.
                    Last edited by Darth Choke; 09-20-2005, 09:55 PM.

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                    • #11
                      An extensive study of RCMP officers found no correlation between wearing a gunbelt and back pain. Titled "Back Pain in a large Canadian Police Force," its available online at:http://www.cprc.org/tr/tr-1999-02.pdf

                      The study was also published in a peer-reviewed medical journal: Spine. 1998 Apr 1;23(7):821-7.

                      Another study, "Low Back Pain Among RCMP Officers: An Investigation Into Vehicles, Duty Belts and Boots" is available at:http://www.cprc.org/tr/tr-1999-01.pdf

                      A guy who teaches "healthy back" classes for cops says there are three things that help: situps, situps, and situps.

                      Some researchers are finding a link between vibration and back pain. One found 94% of helicopter pilots and 70% of the bus drivers surveyed had painful backs.

                      Comment

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