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  • Working County Jail?

    Hey guys,

    I'm an explorer with San Bernardino County Sheriff. I've gone through academy, I've taken a Occupational Program class in Criminal Justice, and I'm currently attending my local college for my Administration of Justice degree(associates). I've been an explorer for eight months now, but I am going to have to resign from my post because my class schedule conflicts with meet times.

    Here's the thing, I want to start working the jails, because I know that you can start working the jails for our county at 18, but i'm not sure what job it is specifically. Does anyone have any information on it? What would I be doing, and is it full time? I hope it's not, because I'm still a student, but I have no problem with working night shift or something of that sort.

    Thanks for all the help.

  • #2
    Working County Jail is a great experience, and it may or may not be full-time for you. If you think you can handle it then give it a shot! It's a great job and will look good on an application for a PD if you choose to goto Patrol.

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    • #3
      Well I know that in the jails they don't use firearms, so that's why you can be 18 and work the jails, but would I be an actual deputy handling the inmates or would I be someone doing paperwork? I'm unsure of the job description.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by OmarE36 View Post
        Well I know that in the jails they don't use firearms, so that's why you can be 18 and work the jails, but would I be an actual deputy handling the inmates or would I be someone doing paperwork? I'm unsure of the job description.
        If you are not 21 you will not be carrying a firearm, and definitely not doing I/M transports then. The only paperwork I do at work is my own charges pressed on inmates or writeups on Inmates.

        If they would hire you at 18 you would be working with inmates, depending on how the jail is setup.

        On the day watch shift I do: 0600-1400

        -Book people in and out of jail
        -Transport Inmates to various locations outside the jail for appointments. (Armed)
        -Court Security (Armed)
        -Haul inmates to and from Court
        -Give out supplys at 0600, grub at 0700, then more grub at 1200.
        -Staggered one hour welfare checks on all pods
        -BS with Officers that stop in the jail to chat
        -Do the Library pick up and delivery of new request for books.
        -Escort I/M's to exercise
        -Cell Shakedowns
        -Dayroom Pod inspections

        My other shift is Mid-watch shift (graveyard shift) 2200-0600
        -Hourly watch tours staggered of course
        -Book in people
        -BS with bored Officers that stop in
        -Supervise Trustees cleaning
        -Surf the internet
        -Read then Approve or Deny IRFs(Kites)
        -Grab Library IRF request for books to be given out later in the day.

        I love my job but for us it's required to work as a Deputy Jailer for 1-2 years before going to Patrol.

        Good luck man!

        EDIT: If they do offer you a job take it! You will learn so much from the Inmates that can only help when you get out on Patrol. You will get into physical fights and have to use the appropriate amount of force, and you will also learn Officer Safety. I think of it as a excellent stepping stone before hitting the streets, since you've been working with convicted Felons you know the games they play.
        Last edited by Stewie; 09-02-2007, 08:22 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by OmarE36 View Post
          Hey guys,

          I'm an explorer with San Bernardino County Sheriff. I've gone through academy, I've taken a Occupational Program class in Criminal Justice, and I'm currently attending my local college for my Administration of Justice degree(associates). I've been an explorer for eight months now, but I am going to have to resign from my post because my class schedule conflicts with meet times.

          Here's the thing, I want to start working the jails, because I know that you can start working the jails for our county at 18, but i'm not sure what job it is specifically. Does anyone have any information on it? What would I be doing, and is it full time? I hope it's not, because I'm still a student, but I have no problem with working night shift or something of that sort.

          Thanks for all the help.

          Every agency is different so to give you a perfect picture of the job is kind of hard. However, the basics are the same: Your keeping an eye on the "social elite" of your county.

          In your other posts you asked if you would be a "deputy" in the jail. Again this varies on your agency. I work county corrections and I am titled as a Corrections Officer. One pretty neat aspect of the the job is that you will have veteran cops looks at you and say, "There is no way I would ever do your job..." It kind of gives you a warm fuzzy feeling.

          Do not get complacent and when in doubt tell them (inmates) no and you will do fine.
          Ever feel like you live in the state of confusion?

          Comment


          • #6
            for LASD, the job is called 'custody assistant'

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            • #7
              Here you are either a Corrections Deputy(Deputy Jailer), or a Road Deputy. Also Arkansas Red is correct the job is tough, but with thick skin and being ready for anything you can do it. I always find it amazing how it can go from peaceful to chaos instantly, and then the adrenaline gets pumping...

              <3 Adrenaline Rushes!

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              • #8
                As horrible as it sounds, I like the actual "shakedown" side to it. Not so much because of the fun in taking their crap away from them (that is just an added perk), but more to see the "jail house engineering" that the inamtes come up with.

                Do not let complacentcy overcome you. Like Stewie said, anything can pop off in a split second.
                Ever feel like you live in the state of confusion?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Working the jails has its pros and cons. Here's my contribution as typed into an earlier post/thread (http://forums.officer.com/forums/sho...hlight=custody) Post # 10:

                  Here is how I responded to NovMike when he was inquiring about the custody issue:

                  I certainly understand your point of view. I shared it when I first joined with a large SO as well. However, there are a few positives to custody time I'd like to point out:

                  1.- You learn a lot of valuable intel in custody. You learn exactly who the criminals are, how they walk/talk/operate, and how they scheme/scam/and flim-flam. That is a very valuable education that takes many years to get on the street. I was 1-2 years in the jails when I was off-duty and drove past a very obvious green/rookie/boot from LAPD on a subject stop in the McArthur Park area. It was obvious he didn't know who he was dealing with on the subject stop as his tactics were poor, his officer-safety was poor, and he was letting the subject control the detention. I could immediately tell, that he was dealing with an MS-13 veterano. The LAPD officer had no idea that the only reason he was still alive that day is because the MS-13 pachuco let him continue living. I thanked God that day for the custody experience the jails provided me.

                  On other occasions I've had the opportunity to talk two or three-on-one with high ranking Mexican Mafia members. I learned how they separate professionalism and personal offenses. I learned how they work the CJ system, how they get court orders for transfer to local jails from prison in order to facilitate meetings, hits, messages, and visits from family. That is a kind of sophistication I would not have learned as a direct-to-the-streets deputy without 5 or 10 years of experience under my belt.

                  2.- Jails provide an incubating ground. For young cops (under 25 or 30), the jails are an outstanding place to learn how to control and direct people, hone survival tactics, get into (or better yet, how to get out of) fights, master concepts of reasonable-suspicion-to-detain and probable-cause-to-arrest, and just plain mature into full adults. Additionally, the lessons casually taught by Seniors, Sergeants, and deputies returned to the jail from patrol (or working overtime) via war stories and advice that is current and relevant is invaluable in making one a better patrol deputy.

                  Just as one should never take a puppy away from its mother and litter before 8 weeks, and the longer with the litter the more socialized and better a dog the puppy becomes, the same is true with a new academy graduate deputy. The longer the deputy spends in the controlled environment of a jail, the better street cop they become.

                  3.- Jails provide a stable structure. For newly married or new parent deputies, the jails provide regular days off with very little unexpected overtime. The chances to get to a more desirable shift and more desirable days off increase as your seniority increases. For those who are finishing a college degree or pursuing promotability the name-recognition you get from working with so many peers in a relatively short amount of time helps you establish a reputation within the Department much more quickly (provided your reputation is good- you're hard working, competent, capable, and not socially retarded). You can also more easily attend training you desire, and you can more easily get into positions that broaden your skills and knowledge (such as working gangs in the jails, working admin or special project spots, working jail-investigations, etc).

                  Finally, the custody environment is helpful in a young deputy's life because of the often amazing amount of very easy overtime available. You can work many, many shifts of overtime ('work' is a relative term when you are simply baby-sitting sleeping inmates) and can bank all that you can to start your adult life. Money for a down payment on a house, money to pay back college loans, money to start a new child's college fund so it has the maximum years of return-on-investment growth before your kid is 18, etc.

                  While I agree that few go into this line of work to fulfill the lifelong dream of being a jailer (cough-cough ), I have to tell you that IMHO, especially looking back on it, those years in the jail were invaluable and I'm very glad to have had them, just as I hated going to college, but looking back those years were invaluable and I'm glad I had them.

                  Finally, please try to keep in mind that sheriff's departments (at least here in SoCal) present opportunities you won't find in many smaller local PDs. Very few have so many vast and varied career opportunities. How many smaller PDs have bomb squads? VIP protection details? Regional narcotic or burglary or bank robbery teams? True full-time SWAT teams that will actually get call outs? Good retirement spots (like transpo (buses), courts, or jails) for when you get old and tired? Nothing like pushing a hack or a hoop around the same 10 square miles when you're 50 years old and 50 pounds overweight.

                  Also, please try to keep an open mind about the positives a custody experience provides, and please don't shut out the possibilities of working for a local Southern California Sheriff's Department simply because of the mandatory custody time.

                  EDJ
                  "It's a game of cat and mouse. It's a game of hide and seek. Albeit games with deadly consequences. Like most games-the better you know the rules, the more likely you are to win."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What I always tell people is that nothing teaches you how to talk and carry yourself better than being locked in a DS unit with 60 felons. Jail is a great place for younger people. It gives you some time to gain confidence while working in a marginally more controlled setting than the street.

                    Though I don't really like jailin', and can't wait to get a street job, it's experience that I wouldn't trade for the world.

                    P.S. Ground fighting skills!
                    Last edited by DetDep; 09-04-2007, 08:18 PM. Reason: English Skills
                    Magistrate: "Do you have any other pending charges?"
                    Drunk: "Well there's this thing where the cops said I spit blood on them."
                    Me: "Wait a minute, that was me!"
                    Drunk: "Oh... now you like me even less."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've heard that on average, it's about a fight per month. Do other deputies come to your aid quickly?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Protect-N-Serve View Post
                        for LASD, the job is called 'custody assistant'
                        We have both custody assistants and deps working at our facilities and do essentially the same job. It may very a little from facility to facility, but we all Deps. and CAs do the same job in jail. What facility do you work out of?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by OmarE36 View Post
                          I've heard that on average, it's about a fight per month. Do other deputies come to your aid quickly?
                          Probably depends on where you work. For instance if you are working LA county jails with 5150 inamtes or high level GPs you'd see fights quite often. Working LA county jails you can or will hear/see/get involved or fights almost everyday. Now getting into a 415 yourself, thats going to depend on many factors ie. location, demeanor, interactions...

                          Most fights I have been involved with I have always been with a partner or the were within visual distance. But once that radio call goes out "415 deps. involved" everyone will try to get there asap.

                          Comment

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