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Thoughts on Auxilliary/Reserve cops?

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  • Thoughts on Auxilliary/Reserve cops?

    I'm a fed and thought of volunteering as an auxilliary/reserve officer with my local PD on the side. Any thoughts? Are Aux/Res officers looked down upon by full-time officers? After 15 yrs as an 1811, I'd like to do something different, but not at the lower pay.

  • #2
    Well, I started out as a reserve officer then got hired fulltime by the same agency. When I was a reserve we had ok relationships with the fulltime guys, until contract negotiation time came around. This iswhen they would get all bent over reserves. It wasn't until I was hired fulltime that I realized what the problem was. The city would utilize reserves to cover shifts as opposed to providing the fulltimers with OT!!! Now this is not the reserves faults, rather the way the city chose to utilize them. SO in answer to your question, I would say that a reserve is a great thing depending on how the city utilizes them. That is where the fulltime vs reserve issues come into play. Now of course there are some ding a lings that are reserves due to not working very much and just not knowing much. Of course I worked with a fulltime guy that was a dumb dumb so it goes both ways. Look into the program and see what it has to offer and maybe talk to the coordinator to see how the fulltime guys relate to reserves. I have found that a fulltime LEO who comes in as a reserve is generally better received than a reserve with reserve training. Just my thoughts on the matter. I am federal now and we obviously don't have reserves so there are no issues here!!!!!

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    • #3
      Just because I like to stir up ****!

      Here is a overview of some thoughts from a thread awhile ago.

      I think you will get a good idea of what a reserve must put up with from some FT officers who think reserves are nothing but un-qualified, un-trainable, just out to play cop, scab labor!

      No of it matters - fact is that if its something you would like to do then go for it. There are cops out there that love us and want us there. Those are the ones that you do it for.

      http://forums.officer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=36527
      There is no greater love - than that of a man - that will give his life for another.

      If God carried a gun - it would be a 1911

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      • #4
        Originally posted by keydet View Post
        I'm a fed and thought of volunteering as an auxilliary/reserve officer with my local PD on the side. Any thoughts? Are Aux/Res officers looked down upon by full-time officers? After 15 yrs as an 1811, I'd like to do something different, but not at the lower pay.
        I haven't heard of an 1811 also being a reserve officer on their off-duty time. Interesting thought, as the only federal LEO's (actual federal employees, not quazi-federal folks) I have heard being police officers on their own time are some CBP Officers. I know one is a level II reserve with LA County Sheriff's Department, though I can't remember which station. He is a pretty squared away guy, and from speaking with him, it sounded like he enjoyed the sheriff's job better than CBP...

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        • #5
          I think a lot of it depends on which state you are from. In Ohio, the training is the same as what is required in becoming full time. I have heard some states requiring as little as 40 hours to get you on the road. In Ohio, it is just under a 600 hour minimum.

          Most small departments are staffed primarily by auxilliary/reserve officers. There might be 2 full timers (Chief & Sgt.) and ten or more reserves that provide the town with 24/7 protection. The reserves patrol by themselves and a lot still get paid $10 or so an hour, just without OPERS (retirement).

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          • #6
            Choose carefully. It all depends on the agency, and its members.

            There on the left-coast, at LAPD, since we have no meaningful cash overtime slots, Reserves are not viewed as taking away our mad-money.

            The worst thing a reserve can do is split up a pair of regular sworn partners. That can cause some resentment. Finding a sworn regular, who loves to work and will work with anyone, anytime, is an absolute blessing to a reserve officer. Another form of resentment is when they hand out reserve ranks such as sergeant, lieutenant, captain, commander....that can really stick in the craw of a sworn regular, "What!?! I've worked here XX years and they tell me there's no room for promotions, this year, again! This guy/gal works for free, a weekend a month and gets to be called _____, that's B/S!

            LAPD's reserve program is resurrecting after being blown to bits by neglect and poor management.

            The best way a reserve officer helps out is by coming in to work for a cop who needs a day off, but staffing levels won't allow the sworn guy the time off.
            "You're never fully dressed without a smile."

            Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

            Three things I know for sure: (1) No bad deed goes unrewarded, (2) No good deed goes unpunished, and (3) It is entirely possible to push the most devoted, loyal and caring person beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SoCalFed View Post
              I haven't heard of an 1811 also being a reserve officer on their off-duty time. Interesting thought, as the only federal LEO's (actual federal employees, not quazi-federal folks) I have heard being police officers on their own time are some CBP Officers. I know one is a level II reserve with LA County Sheriff's Department, though I can't remember which station. He is a pretty squared away guy, and from speaking with him, it sounded like he enjoyed the sheriff's job better than CBP...
              hmm this person doesn't have to be an older asian guy?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ask80 View Post
                hmm this person doesn't have to be an older asian guy?
                I think I know who you're talking about...

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                • #9
                  In Alabama, there is often a difference between a Reserve Officer, and a Part-Time Officer. Let's do the Reserve Officer first. This is an Officer who volunteers hes/her time to the City,County, or State. This Officer is usually not POST certified, and thus has no arrest powers unless with a Regular Officer. The Reserve Officer is armed, and must be qualified with his weapon per POST requirments. The duty requirement for most agencies is two shifts(16 HRS) per month. The Part Time Officer, on the other hand is a fully certified Officer who works on an as-needed basis. Again, the minimum is usually 16 hrs per month. Part time Officers are employed by some counties and municipalities, and often mean the difference between full timers having adequate time off or not. The Part-Time Officer also can mean the difference between adequate staffing levels, and not having sufficient Officers on the street. The Alabama Dept of Public Safety maintains a Reserve Trooper program. This Officer performs duties as previously described, and only only under the supervision of a regular Trooper. The status of Reserve Officers varies from state to state, and even from department to department.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LA Cop View Post
                    I think I know who you're talking about...
                    Apparently we are all thinking of the same person. Small world....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SoCalFed View Post
                      Apparently we are all thinking of the same person. Small world....
                      The biggest question that you have to ask is will your Federal LE Agency/Dept allow you to be a reserve officer. I have heard and have also read that they will not allow you because it could become a conflict. Not necessarily a conflict of interest, but under which agencies capacity you were acting when something happens. Let's say you have to shoot someone and the person (or family/estate) files suit against you, then the question is could they also include the Federal LE Agency as well because you received training there?!? Now let's turn it around, you are in your capacity as a Federal 1811 and shoot someone, could the Local Agency also be held liable...very possible? Or at least there will be numerous $$$'s spent on battling it out in court.

                      On another end, here in Northern Virginia many of the local departments specifically ask if you are a currently employed Federal Agent...this automatically disqualifies you from becoming a reserve/auxillary officer.

                      I would check to make sure my Federal Agency would let me work as a reserve/auxillary officer and then check with the local dept.
                      ------------------------------------------------
                      All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, to make it possible. T E Lawrence

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JeepingLEO View Post
                        On another end, here in Northern Virginia many of the local departments specifically ask if you are a currently employed Federal Agent...this automatically disqualifies you from becoming a reserve/auxillary officer.

                        I would check to make sure my Federal Agency would let me work as a reserve/auxillary officer and then check with the local dept.

                        That is a given to check with your agency....as an 1811, you have to disclose ANY outside employment. Some federal LE postions might be stricter than others, as the CBP Officer we are speaking of definitely didn't hide his reserve status with LA Sheriff's Department to his primary employer. As to the automatic DQ you speak of, is this first hand or rumor? I have never heard of such a thing on the west coast. I'm curious as I haven't met any 1811's who were looking trying to go reserve. Several folks in my office (myself included) already spent many years on the street as patrol officers. I'm NOT knocking the OP who wants to do it, as there are days I miss the streets, but I would venture to say that the overall number of 1811's in the DC metro area trying to be reserves is extremely small to say the least.
                        Last edited by SoCalFed; 09-03-2007, 12:46 PM.

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