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  • #16
    Originally posted by dangerr101 View Post
    Out of curiosity what are some of the best fed law enforcement jobs out there or the most desired?
    The one that hires you and doesn't prosecute you.

    Comment


    • #17
      You'll come to realize it is the one that allows you to live a decent life outside of work. I agree with the sentiment that it is all a crapshoot. People are always chasing coveted positions and are always disappointed in the end.

      Comment


      • beattheodds7051
        beattheodds7051 commented
        Editing a comment
        On the street for almost 3 years as a statie and now starting to find out that what matters is what you do outside of work

      • Bidstar
        Bidstar commented
        Editing a comment
        beattheodds7051 I'm not a LEO but I also came to that realization a few months ago.

    • #18
      The best one is the one that works with your life and checks most of your boxes.

      It’s all different shades of brown and what one person might think is the greatest 1811 gig ever…. Another person wouldn’t even touch it.

      If there’s one thing to be keen on, know which places have high attrition and/or general low satisfaction. Knowledge is power.

      Comment


      • #19
        I can offer some insight from my perspective I’ve been state/local LE for 6 years in Las Vegas I have been TDY with USMS and HSI briefly. Also our neighbor/family friend who we are close with is FBI.

        HSI at least in my city probably the closest thing high speed you will get as far as the fed gigs go. Obviously this doesn’t translate to every field office but ours has 15 fed agents and 23 task force officers. Obviously the 15 FT agents work way more than 40 hours due to lack of man power this solely has to do that Las Vegas falls under Salt Lake AOR and not it’s own AOR. Task force guys get the best of it since they get call out pay and overtime. There are a lot of EROs now tasked force to HSI and they make good money since it’s not leap.

        USMS has I believe 8 full time assigned to fugitive task force. About 12 task force guys from various agencies. I got to work a two week operation with them once. Surveillance is there bread and butter a lot of sitting around for that one moment of excitement then onto the next.

        FBI depends on what division you are under my buddy is under violet crimes and there only 2 of them in the unit extremely busy. This sucks for him since he gets LEAP and works way more hours. There are guys in other units such as safe streets that hardly work past 40 hours. There is so much to do with the FBI and so many field offices.

        My personal opinion summed up if I can go back 10 years ago I would’ve finished college and went to HSI it does a little of what DEA agents get to do on top of complex investigations regarding transnational criminals.
        Timeline:
        09/2014= applied
        10/2014= tested
        11/2014=oral board
        11/2014=background submitted
        03/2015=conditional offer
        04/2015=final offer
        06/2015=started the academy
        09/2015=sworn in

        standby to standby

        Comment


        • Quo Vadis
          Quo Vadis commented
          Editing a comment
          Your info about HSI Las Vegas falling under the Salt Lake City AOR is incorrect. Las Vegas is its own SAC office which covers Nevada and oversees the RAC office in Reno. SLC is an ASAC office under SAC Denver.

          It’s all here: https://www.ice.gov/about-ice/homela...operations#map

        • trooper2864
          trooper2864 commented
          Editing a comment
          Sorry I meant ERO which is ICE falls under Salt Lake AOR not HSI I misspoke

      • #20
        Happy 4th !!

        How about everyone's experience with a uniformed or non 1811; 0083, 0025,1801 etc. Which agency ?

        USFS, USFWS, NPS, BLM, FPS, Mint Police, and so on. Atmosphere is going to be different with the LE fields.
        "whys the sky blue? because god loves the Infantry"

        Comment


        • Jrc1896
          Jrc1896 commented
          Editing a comment
          The grass isn’t always greener at the smaller agencies. I work uniformed LE at a NR agency and it’s not all puppies and kittens. Things can change on a whim and being managed by non law enforcement sucks.

        • Ratatatat
          Ratatatat commented
          Editing a comment
          Work for BLM- where your boss was associated with tree spikers back in the day:

          https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063735885

          Gotta love Interior. Bad hiring, never learning....

        • MP-K-9
          MP-K-9 commented
          Editing a comment
          Good day there, what agency do you work for, how long have you been there, and is it just at your location or park with management ?

          ​​​​​​​Thanks

      • #21
        Originally posted by MP-K-9 View Post
        Happy 4th !!

        How about everyone's experience with a uniformed or non 1811; 0083, 0025,1801 etc. Which agency ?

        USFS, USFWS, NPS, BLM, FPS, Mint Police, and so on. Atmosphere is going to be different with the LE fields.
        Not much first hand experience in these positions but long time federal LEO here.

        FPS (1801)
        The GOOD
        - FPL - GS 12
        - In most/many major cities (duty locations)
        The BAD
        - Not a covered position under 6C/12D (no enhanced federal Le retirement)
        - No premium pay (AUO/LEAP/BPAPRA)
        - Lots of action in many Democrat run cities across the country as of late (could be good if this is your cup of tea)

        BPA (1896)
        The GOOD
        - FPL - GS 12
        - Premium pay (BPAPRA) counts toward retirement/high three and matching for TSP.
        - 6C/12D retirement (50/20 or 25 years at any age)
        - Lots of arrests, foot chases and hands on LE work (immigration). Few other federal LE can compare to the pace of being a BPA in a busy sector.
        - extremely high camaraderie
        The BAD
        - duty locations can be less than desirable (especially for a family)
        - Immigration is a political football and work/morale can vary greatly depending on if a communist occupies the White House.
        - Management can be problematic

        CBPO (1895)
        The GOOD
        - FPL GS 12
        - COPRA - Customs pay system that makes OT very lucrative and up to $22,500 counts toward retirement calculations (high 3)
        - duty location at Port of Entries across the country and some overseas/OCONUS locations
        - 6C/12/D retirement
        The BAD
        - Can be very monotonous work (stamping passports all day in an airport)
        - Seems to be more of a customer service gig than LE gig in some/many locations. Often referred to as TSA with a badge/gun.
        - Problematic Management

        Ranger Positions
        NPS (0025)/BLM (1801)
        The GOOD
        - Have been told by BLM rangers that they love their jobs.
        - Appears to have lots of freedom
        - 6/C/12D retirement
        ​​​ - Premium pay (AUO) authorized for most
        The BAD
        - Remote locations (could be a good thing)
        - FPL is GS/GL 9 for NPS
        - FPL is GS 11 for BLM
        - Have heard of problematic management especially with NPS and USFWS due to chain of command being non LE.

        Police Officer (0083)
        Many/Most of these positions top out at around the GS 6/7 level and are not considered LE for retirement/enhanced general schedule.
        There are exceptions (US Park Police, BIA Police and a few others). BIA tops out at GL 8 to my understanding and USPP I believe has their own pay schedule. Experience can vary greatly depending on agency and location (Have heard the USPP is a decent gig) but not a place (0083) where most would be happy. Most 0083 positions more akin to security/MP work. Depends on what one wants in life/career. Could make a very nice retirement job for a retired local LEO.


        Last edited by Exbpa340; 07-04-2021, 03:00 PM.
        “Right now I'm having amnesia and déjà vu at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.” - Steven Wright

        US Army MP (95B) 1992-1997
        DOJ Agent/ DHS Officer 1997 to Present

        Comment


        • wildlife97
          wildlife97 commented
          Editing a comment
          Couple things about your NPS/BLM mention:

          -NPS does not do AUO. They previously did it for FTOs but that ended about 5 years ago.
          -BLM Rangers have a lot of freedom, for the most part NPS Rangers do not have much of any freedom.
          -As of Feb 1, 2021 USFWS LEOs no longer report to civilian managers. They now report to a Patrol Captain who in turn reports to a Regional LE Chief.

        • Exbpa340
          Exbpa340 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the scoop.

          Good to know the COC has improved with NPS but a GL 9 without AUO sounds even less tempting. BLM Rangers have mostly been positive about their jobs but would say that it’s not for most/some.

        • darkhorse6
          darkhorse6 commented
          Editing a comment
          BIA is the most run and gun of any 0083 gig. It’s also the only one I know that functions like a sheriff’s office, but super ghetto with violence and drugs.

          Non native officers deal with lots of racism/prejudice and the mindset is suck it up or get another job. If you enjoy lots of action (grossly understaffed in very high crime areas) and don’t mind VERY rural living (closest Walmart roughly 2hrs away) then the BIA can be awesome. Wanna clear over 120k after taxes? You sure can… but you’ll be working 5-7 12hr shifts a week most likely by yourself almost all year.

          Like others have said, one man’s trash is another’s treasure.

      • #22
        No personal experience just doing lots of research to hopefully land an 1811 gig in the near future. Anyone know how much time a newer DEA SA /non supervisor will spend in the office typing/paperwork ? How does it work are you given your first case to work with the help of other agents, do you work with a coach like a Police officer? Do you start by assisting other agents to get your feet wet?
        Seems like it could be fun but also a lot of writing which like my current job writing reports and affidavits/criminal complaints is something i'm decent with but by all means not the MVP of my station.

        The USMS also seems cool. Fugitive task forces look like it is highly competitive and the coolest gig for the younger ish guys or the thrill seekers. WITSEC also seems cool if anyone has any info on that please share.

        I pulled over an HSI agent not too long ago. They seem to work some pretty cool stuff. She mentioned she was UC just got done with serving a warrant and recently got burned by a target. She had a new jeep grand cherokee for her G ride and was clueless to traffic laws lol. Haven't got the opportunity to really work directly or speak with other 1811's to see what other gigs are really like.
        Last edited by beattheodds7051; 07-04-2021, 06:11 PM.

        Comment


        • Levithane
          Levithane commented
          Editing a comment
          I'm not an 1811, but get used to writing reports. As in be able to write coherently so the average person can understand it.

          Just for discussion sake, I had to read a police report on someone on my case load who was allegedly involved in charges resulting in a 50,000 dollar bond. I won't get into specifics since it is still ongoing, but they did a sh$% job explaining what gave them reason to arrest him days after the incident took place. As in my supervisor also read this report and also can't figure out what gave them indication to arrest him for these charges.So moral is, be able to write reports that answer more questions, than create questions.

        • DaShwstoppahbk
          DaShwstoppahbk commented
          Editing a comment
          Current 1811 with DEA. Been on around 6 years. I made a prior comment about all this a few years back. First off, you will NOT come right out of the academy and be handed a case to work unless you are with a senior agent. Hell in some offices you may not even be allowed to lead a case for years. Maybe it’s different in other offices but I was sorta along for the ride my first year assisting and didn’t really get a seat at the decision table until year two. Again, may vary by office.

          With most investigative 1811 jobs (think DEA, ATF, FBI and HSI) you will be writing reports, ops plans, and affidavits and doing surveillance, interview different CSs a lot. This part of your “investigation” typically will take many months. I am NOT exaggerating this. Occasionally you will have a “quick hit” but that isn’t overly common. This is NOT just a DEA thing. Complex criminal investigations take months or years.

          All for your 10-15 min of fun (arrests/tactics). After that, you will be handing all your evidence (called “discovery”) over to attorneys/be in court a lot for a few months, rinse repeat. That’s the basic job.

          There are a few exceptions federally. The USMS don’t write a lot. At least the ones I know anyway. They are in court a lot and They also make a lot of fugitive arrests (people agencies like DEA and HSI have already investigated and charged....aka the not fun part). No one likes the investigation part. Reality is that’s the job.

          USSS does a lot of flying and protection (less investigating, but way more standing around and watching....wonder why they always are hiring yet?)

          If you don’t like investigating money laundering by looking at bank accounts, sitting in your car for hours on end “waiting”, writing LONG legal documents/reports (think 10-15 pages, though some are up to 80-100, yes you read that right) being woke up at 10pm because your CI has a new “tip” about a dude you can’t arrest for months, having the evidence to arrest someone but having to wait due to complexities in the case/red tape, or yes even crypto currency, prob wont be your cup of tea. I love my job and love this type of stuff, but too often “tactical tommy” graduates quantico with his 100 push ups in 2 minutes and wants to tackle the first doper he sees, but can’t write for Sh** and gets frustrated when he can’t make a case cause he was the top shooter at quantico.

          Sorry, reality is that is NOT THE JOB. It may have been back in the late 80s or early 90s it’s not now, again at least not in my office. It’s a slow burn. Not trying to scare anyone away. Trying to paint a realistic picture.

          I would ballpark the job as 45% writing, 30% surveillance, 15% interviews, 10% enforcement/tactics. Will there be exceptions? ABSOLUTELY. But it’s not the majority. Others may reply with counterdictions and how I’m not accurate. For every one example you give me trying to prove your point, I will give you 50 proving mine. Hopefully this helps.
          Last edited by DaShwstoppahbk; 07-05-2021, 04:03 AM.

        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          Dude your breakdown helped a lot. I was sure it wasn't all peaches and cream and a lot of the stuff no one likes doing ie writing reports and docs and hurry up and wait... Working near a big city has opened my eyes up vs being in the military I had no Idea what really happens on the streets... (No law enforcement dad or anything like that like a lot of my co workers) I like the mission of the DEA and see the damage done by criminal narco organizations/cartels and traffickers on a daily basis but it might not be for everyone and tougher than most think as far as writing good solid reports and making those big serious cases with land the big sentences. Thank you for breaking it down and painting a realistic picture!

        • Winter_Patriot
          Winter_Patriot commented
          Editing a comment
          Extremely informative, thanks for taking the time to write that. Still deciding if I want to pursue an 1811 job. Currently a US Probation Officer and wanted something with less desk time. I get into the field one day a week now, but it's typically repetitive home contacts.

      • #23
        To be perfectly honest I am counting down the days until I retire which is two years and five months but when I do stop and think about the fact that I get paid to fly airplanes and helicopters and get the occasional boat ride my job with CBP Air & Marine is pretty kick butt, we chase bad guys from the air and from the sea most of what we do is support other agencies in surveillance missions and occasionally we generate our own targets. My paperwork is minimal and my court time is also minimal, GS 13 pay with LEAP is a comfortable living and our hours are somewhat flexible.

        https://www.cbp.gov/careers/amo

        Comment


        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          I was looking at the CBPAMO instagram page the other day... Looked pretty cool and the birds boats look awesome... I grew up going off shore on a 21' so I know my ways around a boat but i'm sure its competitive and or like in other places a popularity contest/kissing ***/who you know helps a ton gig on top of having the needed quals.... Is CBPAMO within Border patrol therefore you get LEAP as opposed to the CBP officers?

        • DiverB72
          DiverB72 commented
          Editing a comment
          AMO is it’s own agency within DHS-CBP, and yes we earn LEAP. As far as butt kissing to get the job not so much you have to have the professional credentials in order to get hired well before you’ll ever meet your supervisor. Just like most agencies these past few years, we are competing with the others to try and hire quality people. If you meet the hiring requirements then I would encourage anyone to apply.

        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          Had no idea you could apply directly thought it was like most places where you have to do a few years before applying to those types of gigs and competing for the spot... nice

      • #24
        Prior local that switched to USMS.

        A lot depends on your district, and even office within a district. I was assigned to a sub-office right out of the academy and was given fugitive cases and worked a lot of court, in addition to other things like protection details, serving process and so on. Being a prior local cop helped me a lot, and they expected me to know how to do most things.

        USMS overall does not write a lot of reports, especially compared to other 1811 agencies. We do partake in the execution of arrest warrants in OCDETF cases and for agencies that may not have the tactical skills and equipment to do higher risk warrants. We get to do the fun part and leave. We also get to do extraditions which is awesome. Our investigations are generally short in nature, and you will be dealing with prisoners and fugitives on a daily basis. It is not some cushy OIG.

        The USMS criminal investigative mission is expanding with the FPL13 initiative. DUSMs will be expected to make cases for detention management issues, escapes, threats against protected persons, felon in possession cases, and other things related to USMS mission. None of these are really long term. The only long term investigations that I know of is the top 15 most wanted investigations.

        Court DUSMs work a pretty regular shift, and warrants DUSMs work well beyond LEAP.

        For me personally, the USMS was a perfect fit- I like the duties, management, work/ life balance, mission, and was hired in the same district I lived in.

        And going from local to federal was the best decision of my life. While I miss certain aspects of local, the grass is much greener on the federal side. Better pay, retirement, hours, benefits, and so on.

        Comment


        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          Your info pretty much sealed the deal for me on my #1 choice of 1811. I will be putting in for DUSM once again since I failed the interview a few months ago. Working patrol at a busy station I can relate to your prior experience (insane amount of BS on patrol in my department/station) and from all the research I've done i'm 99.9% sure i'll be happier if I can make it happen. Thank you for your write up

        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          Good afternoon,
          Just wanted to ask about USMS fugitive operations outside of the states. I know there are fugitives who you guys do look for in countries like Mexico, colombia (I think) and other countries. One DUSM mentioned to me he was traveling to Bolovia If I remember correctly and my dumb ask didn't ask what for lol. If you know any info of these assignments please share

        • IndexBoss
          IndexBoss commented
          Editing a comment
          beattheodds7051 The USMS does have a few foreign postings, I am unfamiliar with their duties to be honest. I think they mainly coordinate extraditions. USMS deputies assigned to districts, including myself, can volunteer for international extraditions. They are short term. My last one I went to another country for 4 or 5 days and flew with the prisoner back. Its highly desired so my district has a rotation for extraditions. You can sometimes add personal leave ahead of an extradition and pay any difference to make a mini vacation out of it. Deputies from my district have done extraditions in Poland, Romania, Columbia, Canada, Thailand, and a few others I can't remember.

        • beattheodds7051
          beattheodds7051 commented
          Editing a comment
          That sounds awesome why not get paid to travel!!

      • #25
        I'm an IRS-CI SA and even in the same agency, the same field office, the same group, two agents out of the academy at the same time will have wildly different career paths.

        IRS-CI SAs get handed cases right out of the academy. Each of us are expected to maintain a caseload. I've been lucky that my case load changes pretty frequently and I can experience new cases pretty often.

        One of my classmates from the academy has been working one large complicated case for nearly her entire time out of the academy. Multiple agents assigned. Multiple agencies. Multiple bureaucratic road blocks. Headache all around.

        On the one hand, I love the job because I pick and choose my cases, work at my own pace, and am generally left alone by management until I need to move something up the chain for approval. While we have to work our LEAP, I generally have a very 9-5 (or 8-6) kind of life. Pretty predictable.

        On the other hand, it's incredibly frustrating sometimes trying to get a case prosecuted. It's a long, drawn out process to write up our reports, get them reviewed internally, and then get them in the hands of a prosecutor. There's a lot of minutia that everyone above you wants looked at, and it gets tedious.

        I think some in our agency think going to a task force will help with some of the issues, but then you have two masters to keep happy, with competing and clashing missions at times.

        FBI/ATF/HSI/DEA all sound similar as well, other than having an easier time of getting things done. Still, it's a lot of writing, lot of waiting, lot of explaining your case again to your third acting supervisor in a year...

        My 2 cents: get hired on by any, work a few years, then see about going to another agency if you really want a change.

        Pretty universal opinions you should take with a grain of salt: Every other agency is jealous of the Bureau, Marshals are the highest speed, and everyone hates on USSS, most of all USSS agents. Go to grand jury returns and see how quickly former USSS S/As turned OIG start complaining about USSS....
        Last edited by cdubya; 07-05-2021, 08:56 AM.

        Comment


        • #26
          It’s all subjective. Stop the clock prior to aging out, then spend the rest of your career looking for the right fit at that given time.

          Comment


          • #27
            DaShwstoppahbk posted:

            I would ballpark the job as 45% writing, 30% surveillance, 15% interviews, 10% enforcement/tactics.
            In all candor, mine would breakdown along these lines:

            25% writing reports and affidavits
            15% reading 100 emails a day not germane to anything I was doing
            15% completing on-line training not germane to anything I was doing
            15% 1811 co-workers coming to my cubicle to gossip or complain
            10% interviews and surveillance
            10% enforcement operations
            10% fixing problems, i.e.- expired passwords, busted G-ride, endless radio and tech equip failures...





            People are less likely to shoot at you if you smile at them.

            "Mad Jack" Churchill

            Comment


            • Quo Vadis
              Quo Vadis commented
              Editing a comment
              Lots of driving to and fro, as well. Especially for small agencies, the AORs are big and getting to where you're going to do surveillance, interviews, meeting with AUSAs, and enforcement ops can mean many hours of driving.

            • Smilingsmokey
              Smilingsmokey commented
              Editing a comment
              Most accurate description I’ve seen.

            • Shadowtrain
              Shadowtrain commented
              Editing a comment
              +1 for accuracy.

              Don't forget the meetings about meetings, that should have been an email.
              I'm in a small shop with a large AOR, so 25% of my time is probably driving like Quo Vadis

          • #28
            Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
            DaShwstoppahbk posted:



            In all candor, mine would breakdown along these lines:

            25% writing reports and affidavits
            15% reading 100 emails a day not germane to anything I was doing
            15% completing on-line training not germane to anything I was doing
            15% 1811 co-workers coming to my cubicle to gossip or complain
            10% interviews and surveillance
            10% enforcement operations
            10% fixing problems, i.e.- expired passwords, busted G-ride, endless radio and tech equip failures...




            Shhhh! I didnt want to scare too many people off! That is probably a better breakdown though. But you forgot to add in the percentage of time you spend having to continuously explain your investigation, and in turn what kind of assistance you are requesting, in different meetings (with either partner agencies or prosecutors). God forbid there just be one meeting for everyone.

            Comment


            • Ratatatat
              Ratatatat commented
              Editing a comment
              5%- sitting in supervisors office with blank look as he rambles on, telling you how to do something he has never successfully done.
              Last edited by Ratatatat; 07-07-2021, 10:39 AM.

          • #29
            Solid information all around. This is one of the best forum discussions for current and potential LEO's interested in pursuing the feds. Good stuff.

            Comment


            • #30
              U.S.Ranger with BLM is hard to beat. The amount of freedom to patrol does not exist anywhere else.

              Comment

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