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  • Afosi

    AFOSI just popped up on USAJOBS. Anyone here applying?

  • #2
    I was researching but a lot of negative stuff about life as an OSI agents...

    Comment


    • Smilingsmokey
      Smilingsmokey commented
      Editing a comment
      Can you elaborate? I’m thinking of applying, but it seems it’d be hard to transfer from excepted to competitive service if you ever wanted to leave. Better than nothing, but working under the DOD isn’t my first choice.

    • dark321
      dark321 commented
      Editing a comment
      This isn't my word but I came across one post that said this. A few other people said similar things. Maybe some other osi agents can shed some truth or light

      "As a field agent you'll work anything from criminal, fraud, or counterintelligence (CI) investigations - they're all run the same exact way just some take longer than others and CI investigations obviously deal with classified information and are prosecuted slightly differently than criminal or fraud cases. There are somewhat specialized positions you can get into like Special Access Programs (SAP/SAR) or Protective Services Operations (PSO) but they are not considered specialties within AFOSI that are a lateral cross-train/shred. With things like PSO, once you're certified, you can be at a base running criminal cases and the POTUS might show up in your state and you'll have to go TDY to work with the Secret Service to provide protection for him or you can go to a MAJCOM or HQ and every 4-star General usually has an AFOSI Agent as a Personal Security Advisor (PSA) that travels with them as their bodyguard. Some positions have more Agents (like CSAF and USAF/CC who have full detachments devoted to their security).

      Generally, if you're not recruited as a specialist, you'll have to do your first full tour before you can apply for one of those position. All new Agents have a year of probation filled with OJT at a regular AFOSI detachment before you can be fully certified after training.

      Hrmm... Other than that, you're a novelty and a curse. Everyone is intrigued by you, but everyone hates you. If you're single, you'll have a hard time making friends and having relationships outside of AFOSI. If you're married, your marriage WILL be strained because of AFOSI.

      AFOSI Agents are on-call 24/7 and you're generally working 12 hour days 6 days a week, on a good week. There will often be times that you work nearly 72 hours straight or 7-8 days straight with little or no comp time. There's no such thing as a slow base - there's always something going on and the sheer amount of paperwork associated with anything will keep you more than busy when there's a lull in the real action.

      AFOSI Agents have discretionary arming which means you can carry your duty weapon whenever and wherever you want to - including on leave, or not at all. There's a few situations where you're required to carry your weapon, but depending on which section you're in, you could go a month or two without touching your weapon IF you want to - however, MOST Agents are armed 24/7.

      Every AFOSI Agent has a love/hate relationship with AFOSI. The longer you stay in, the more you hate it. But most that stay in do so because they want the retirement. So they put up with all the extra BS."

  • #3
    Originally posted by parkscout93 View Post
    AFOSI just popped up on USAJOBS. Anyone here applying?
    Yup. Be aware though, they are pretty autonomous with their hiring times — they post in Oct, interview in Jan/Feb, hire in April for a June start date. From what I understand, that’s been the timeline for the last 3 years. I only mention since I saw in the NCIS thread you have 15 months left of service time left.

    Comment


    • parkscout93
      parkscout93 commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't have all my eggs in one basket. I'm already in the process for USMS, I dropped my resume at NCIS yesterday, and I'll be applying for FBI in about a month. This would just be another one. I could always say, "sorry, I can't accept".

    • battlewagon
      battlewagon commented
      Editing a comment
      Man you are glutton for punishment lol. I've only heard negative things about NCIS. Absolutely no trust or authority allowed from managers, having to get like HQ or regional HQ level approval for the both minute of things, a pretty much across the board policy of watching the clock down to the second not letting you go home even three minutes early of your 10 hour shift + LEAP day, and a lot more. I read the giant NCIS thread, saw a lot, and messaged some guys who were current agents in there and the responses were pretty much the same across the board. I can't recall now but I think one of the guys said their office had found a way to strip most SAs of taking their G rides home. But I may be misremembering that.

    • parkscout93
      parkscout93 commented
      Editing a comment
      battlewagon Sounds a little like CID. But it's only one option among many. If I decide against NCIS, I could always use this hiring process as practice for a job I really want.

  • #4
    I was an 1811 with OSI for several years before finally moving on. I’ve posted this in other threads but the short version is stay far away from OSI unless this is your only way to become an 1811. There are so many issues with the agency I could write a research paper, but here are some quick highlights off the top of my head:

    1. morale is abysmal, walk into any OSI office, which is likely to be in a dilapidated building on base, you’ll rarely encounter an agent that actually wants to stay in OSI. The ones stay are typically doing so because they are military and have time in service obligations, too close to retirement or civilians trapped in excepted service, can’t lateral and can’t take a paycut to move to another agency. sure there are some sweet civilian gigs on JTTFs, overseas embassy billets, force protection detachments... the one thing those assignments all have in common is that those are all out of command.

    2. Majority of the mid level leadership have no clue what they are doing. You see promotion and leaders in OSI are based on rank, not on experience. So what you will encounter is a bunch of 5 year captains who have barely run real cases and now they are in charge of an attachment. And don’t ever question an officers authority in a military organization, no matter how wrong they may be. Majority of the agency are military and therefore have no statutory authority off base. But because majority of leadership have no clue how to actually be an agent, you get variety of follies such as officers allowing enlisted agent to arrest civilians off base, a direct violations of posse comitatus, or officers telling civilians they can’t arrest someone because that officer has never actually arrested anyone, like the majority of OSI agents.

    3. the agency espouses this impartiality bs about case running, it will tell you it doesn’t care about stats such as arrests/indictments/convictions. That is true, because 95% of OSI agents have never indicted anyone in a real civilian court, or issued a real subpoena for that matter. OSI cares about meeting its own stupid internal matrix, making sure a case is “sufficient” in that it checked every box on its checklist, and units can pass DoD inspections. Those are the stats it cares about. Because passing an inspection with glowing colors means that officer can now promote, not how many actual convictions that office got under his or her leadership.

    the CI side is just as bad and all about trivial numbers games instead of actually doing something to make an impact.

    all that said, I don’t intend to bash most of the agents because I worked with many phenomenal agents in OSI, enlisted, officer and civilians. The agency just doesn’t care about being actual law enforcement and it absolutely drive good agents insane. I’ve pushed for many good OSI agents to get out, because their talents are being wasted away in the agency working stupid cases, and I will continue to get as many of them out as possible.

    NCIS has many similar issues because it has to follow certain military guidelines on case priorities, but the agency is ran much better and they actually have an LE mentality. If you had to chose between the two I’d absolutely recommend you pick NCIS. For the love of god don’t do army CID, whatever I said about OSI goes double for CID

    Comment


    • parkscout93
      parkscout93 commented
      Editing a comment
      Very informative, thank you.

      Interesting that you think CID is worse than OSI... I'm an enlisted CID agent currently. This sounds very similar to how it is for me.

    • Smilingsmokey
      Smilingsmokey commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for your input. Very insightful.

    • dstoke
      dstoke commented
      Editing a comment
      From my limited exposure to CID, I think the organization is even more rigid and checklist oriented than OSI. As a civilian you a more independence and leeway than what I observed from CID

  • #5
    This is one place I will not apply for thanks for the heads up. I know how it is dealing with incompetent leadership with no experience just got promoted because of rank or of they are well liked.

    Comment


    • #6
      I put in for this announcement. Prior USAF intel officer and current city police detective. Does anyone have input into the deployment tempo as an OSI agent? Is it the same for 1811 agents and .mil agents? Do 1811 agents have opportunities for task force assignments, etc.? Or are they primarily tied to a UCMJ related caseload on base?

      Comment


      • MAA
        MAA commented
        Editing a comment
        Military are required to deploy, civilians, as of this moment, are not.

        There are several task forces and embassy liaison spots, however only civilians are eligible for them.

      • RJflyer
        RJflyer commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you.

    • #7
      So I would say like many jobs, the leadership can make or break your time with AFOSI. I am a current agent and love it and will stay with AFOSI for a while. Some of the above comments are correct though. Due to the nature of the military and being promoted, agents are sometimes thrown into leadership positions not ready or not wanting to do it. With my time in OSI I have always worked for great leadership from the detachment level up to our region level. The comment about agents not indicting people in a real civilian court is also true for most agents, it's because we mainly investigate military members who are prosecuted under the uniform code of military justice.

      The biggest thing I see with disgruntled agents, are people who didn't understand what they were getting themselves into. What I mean by that is we are not the DEA or USMS going out kicking doors down all the time. I've served federal search warrants off base before, but not with large tactical teams busting in doors. A majority of cases will likely be sex crimes, deal with it, thats the nature of the beast. The military is generally a bunch of people 18-26, that joined to try and have a better life and basically have all expenses covered. So their paychecks are basically spending money to do what ever they want with.

      OSI does have sufficiency standards, and we will often investigate a case further than local police departments will. A lot of this is Congressional mandated such as with sex assault investigations. Sometimes those standards are a pain in the butt, because of something specific to that case, but it is a way to try and make sure people do not cut corners in places they shouldn't.

      At the end of the day it is all about your leadership team. My leadership teams have always been great and have had common sense. We've always been able to have open conversations about sufficiency standards and metrics. Again, it is the military so there is a chain of command and structure, something to remember.

      If you apply, just do some reading about the agency first and what falls within our jurisdiction. If do so, and are interested, then apply. If you aren't interested in the military, moving every 3-6 years, doing sex assault cases, or whatever, don't waste your time or our time.

      Comment


      • #8
        Question to those agents at larger bases, is it possible to do multiple years at one large base or are you going to be required to move ever 3-6 years? I know that you sign a mobility agreement but was wondering if you picked a larger bases if you could settle their for multiple tours. Regardless I am interested and will be applying. Just looking to prepare the wife more if I am able to snag one of the coveted positions with OSI.

        Comment


        • #9
          You can sometimes make it work to stay at the same base for a while, but you will have to change jobs. For example at Andrews you could bounce from Andrews Detachment, to the specialty squadron or fraud unit, then maybe the Pentagon or Ft Meade and maybe a HQ tour in there. Do not expect to be a basic field agent though the entire time. You can pull this off at quite a few bases actually, but you have to be willing to maybe become a polygrapher and pass the school, or be a procurement fraud investigator, or any of the other specialty assignments in that area. Another important thing is you have to be good at your job, if you are good at your job and the bosses like you, they can use whatever power they have to keep you stationary. Sometimes though, it just doesn't work because people have to return from overseas, or deploy or something.

          I've met people who have done this and have stayed in the same area for up to 13 years. I wouldn't advise that though, it just makes the move harder when it gets forced.
          Last edited by Autorotate; 10-29-2019, 03:47 AM.

          Comment


          • #10
            Glad I read this thread before spending the time on the non usajobs resume package. Doesn't sound like the right fit for me, I will stay in land management with my boss hundreds of miles away!

            Comment


            • #11
              I was a civilian OSI Agent before i left for my current agency. All comments about the agency are true. Long story short, if you want to work real fed cases as an 1811 do not go to OSI. If you have never been an 1811 or other LEO and want to break into the 1811 field then OSI could fit for you. If you have no other Fed or LEO job to compare OSI to, you won’t really know what your missing. Probably another reason why they are hiring interns as agents. They have a hard time keeping experienced people as agents. Most of the civilians in my basic class at FLETC have moved on or are trying to move on from this agency.

              Comment


              • #12
                OSI or USSS 1811?

                Comment


                • dstoke
                  dstoke commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That’s a tough one. If you are single and don’t mind being on the road USSS might be better. If you need stability, at least in terms of not consistently being TDY then OSI might be better. Other pro for USSS is you are not a vet then you will have competitive status after 3 years and some change. For OSI you will always be except service, which makes lateraling almost impossible. I’ve heard horror stories from former USSS agents, I’d say in terms of having the choice on assignments and being treated well OSI is better.

              • #13
                Originally posted by WillB1smday View Post
                I was a civilian OSI Agent before i left for my current agency. All comments about the agency are true. Long story short, if you want to work real fed cases as an 1811 do not go to OSI. If you have never been an 1811 or other LEO and want to break into the 1811 field then OSI could fit for you. If you have no other Fed or LEO job to compare OSI to, you won’t really know what your missing. Probably another reason why they are hiring interns as agents. They have a hard time keeping experienced people as agents. Most of the civilians in my basic class at FLETC have moved on or are trying to move on from this agency.
                This is pretty accurate comment. If you want to work "big" criminal investigations, OSI is probably not the place. I know some agents that love sex crimes and therefore are a perfect fit for a lot of investigations. I personally enjoy counterintelligence, along with dabbling in crim cases, so I love my job everyday.

                Comment

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