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Prosecutor to LEO for Financial Crimes

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  • SHU
    replied
    DEA and IRS is where I would look if I wanted to work financial crimes and money laundering. But in any agency you are going to be doing grunt work for years before you get to do stuff you want to do. That is just how it works. In a local agency it will be much worse in that respect than as a fed. But have no illusions, that will be the case in any agency you go to. And you will be spending 98% of your time doing this type of work behind a desk.

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  • Levithane
    replied
    DEA is supposed to be having another announcement soon. If you want financial crimes look no further than the illegal drug industry/drug trade. Wouldn't rule out USMS tbh, they do their own share of financial work. USMS does a good amount of work related to assest forfeiture.

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  • waffledog47
    replied
    Just my .02 - don't do USSS. There are rare exceptions, such as a guy I knew of who had some FLETC computer courses completed from another agency, and then got assigned right to a cyber group in USSS and never did protection (save when somebody came to town), but if you do USSS, expect to be spending the better part of your career doing protection, not working financial crimes cases.

    FBI, HSI, IRS-CI, USPIS, and every OIG in the federal government would look extremely favorably on a prosecutor who did financial crime cases who wants to come over as an 1811, especially one with your professional experience (i.e., not just out of law school) - put in for every 1811 opportunity that comes up for those agencies, and I'm confident you will get on with one of them fairly quickly.

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  • battlewagon
    commented on 's reply
    This. My BP friend who went local to get home and then FBI is about to go back local. All he does is chase CT leads, half of which are 10+ years old. Never worked a case, never made an arrest. He hates it.

    Edit: not even CT, it's like counter Intel he's assigned to. Chasing down all those spies around his office area lol. As you can imagine, there's not a lot of work for him since he's probably in the least likely to have spies location in the US
    Last edited by battlewagon; 10-14-2019, 05:00 PM.

  • 9L81
    replied
    I've seen many attorneys become 1811s. One in my agency was a deputy DA in the Southwestern US. Now an agent in the Northwest. The others did not work in CJ but the fed loves to hire attorneys. Heck, I even know of a medical doctor who went to HSI.

    Pay within CA state agencies is appalling so I don't blame you for not wanting to work there. Not sure how they find people to take those jobs.

    Issue with FBI is you may never work criminal cases and just end up working CT. Recent training with several agents mostly working narcotics and they explained why so many FBI are unhappy because they sit in a SCIF and figure things out then tell some foreign entity to go deal with it. The CT subjects are rarely in the US. I asked those FBI agents why their applicant pool was down to about 1/3 of it's normal and that was a major reason according to them. But FBI does have great resources.

    If you took some accounting classes or could qualify on experience, IRS would be a good fit for you. HSI and USSS are probably your next best bet.
    Last edited by 9L81; 10-11-2019, 10:59 AM. Reason: Did not work in CJ

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  • Ratatatat
    replied
    One option not yet mentioned: State Attorney General offices. They typically have investigators working financial crimes.

    RE: career jumping from prosecutor to cop. I have seen it happen, but only once. More common are guys who went to law school but never took the bar (or passed the bar) becoming cops. I know quite a few of those cats....

    Why do so few prosecutors jump over? My guess would be because they have personal ambitions and aspirations of greatness and becoming a cop doesn't mesh with the plan. Every prosecutor I've known had an end game in mind- i.e., like district court judge or national office (congressman or senator). Having to deal with cops and perps all day was a stepping stone, and the last thing they wanted to do was actually see the blood and teeth on the ground. So if you do walk away from the prestige and power of being a prosecutor to respond to injury MVAs and domestics in section 8 housing, you will be in rare company....

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  • reils49
    replied
    Originally posted by retired1995 View Post

    Speaking very frankly, if I had it all to do over again I would have remained a patrolman on the night shift for my entire career, rather than evolving through a series of (more or less) high-profile positions with political pressures as a constant companion. Just my $0.02 worth.
    It’s funny, I took the sergeant’s exam this spring and scored high. Then I got through the interview, and ended up on the top of the list.

    Now, I have been in a suit for almost 3 years and it isn’t getting any better. Gray hairs are starting to come in and the @$$ ache is nonstop. I’m seriously contemplating going back to uniform whenever I put the stripes on.

    The highest earners here are always patrol guys. By a huge margin too.

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  • PostalWannabe
    commented on 's reply
    I mean, I literally said I don't think I'm too good for patrol work. I was simply asking for feedback on the odds/timeframe of being able to promote to detective to do financial crimes.

  • CCCSD
    replied
    Yep!^^^^^^^^^^

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  • retired1995
    replied
    Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
    If you’re NOT ready to push a patrol car for 30 years, you’re not ready for LE. What makes you think you are any better than those patrol guys already working..? There are NO guarantees that you will EVER make detective.
    Speaking very frankly, if I had it all to do over again I would have remained a patrolman on the night shift for my entire career, rather than evolving through a series of (more or less) high-profile positions with political pressures as a constant companion. Just my $0.02 worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCCSD
    replied
    If you’re NOT ready to push a patrol car for 30 years, you’re not ready for LE. What makes you think you are any better than those patrol guys already working..? There are NO guarantees that you will EVER make detective.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jwebb514
    replied
    Another thought - most financial institutions have money laundering and fraud investigators. Definitely don’t have to worry about working nights or weekends when you work for a bank.

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  • Wise135
    replied
    Originally posted by PostalWannabe View Post
    I'm currently a local prosecutor working financial crimes. This is the type of work I have always wanted to do
    As others have suggested, consider HSI. There are many areas within HSI where you can follow the money.


    Originally posted by PostalWannabe View Post
    The point of this post is to get people's opinions on going the local LEO route. If I want to work financial crimes specifically, how doable is that?...From what I have been told, you have to do at least 5 years on patrol before you can make detective. Obviously it will vary by agency, but is that generally accurate?
    Locally it’s possible for you to work financial crimes, but there is less certainty and involves too many factors. Yes, you would have to start in patrol for an indeterminate amount of time. You could become a detective in as few as two years, or it could take more than 5 years. Becoming a detective could also involve favorable views of your work history, the amount of detective positions available, and the police (political) administration. If given the position of detective, there is still no certainty that you would work financial crimes. And your tenure as a detective will involve political considerations, and whether you want to promote or are forced to.

    Detectives nearly always face the possibility of being returned to patrol if they mess up, make their supervisors mad, or get promoted and go to patrol as a supervisor. However, as an 1811, you wouldn’t have to worry about ever having to wear a uniform again, answer calls for service, or do an accident report.


    Originally posted by PostalWannabe View Post
    I don't think I'm "above" doing patrol work, but if my goal is detective work and I am nearing my mid-30s then I need to get a move on.
    Apply to HSI the next time there is an opening. Although there may be others, HSI is the only 1811 agency I’m aware of that won’t disqualify you if you turn 37 while in the hiring process and are a non-veteran. As long as you are 36 or less when the announcement closes, you can continue in the process and get hired. (Some will argue to the contrary, but I know this for a fact!)

    ​​​​​​​
    Originally posted by PostalWannabe View Post
    Do you know anyone who made the switch? Did it work out for them? Any other general advice on making the switch, or reasons not to?
    Yes I do know people who left the desk to become special agents. Did it work out? Some constantly complain because being an 1811 isn’t a 9-5 job with all nights and weekends off, and where they can spend all the time they desire with their wife and kids. Unscheduled work and time away from family is normal; it also occurs in some groups more than others. The complaining gets annoying to listen to, and makes one wonder what they thought they were signing up for. Others seem to accept the job and its demands, but it’s obvious they are behind when it comes to conducting investigations. That’s understandable if someone isn’t a former cop with years of experience. Just be willing to learn from the former cops and senior agents.





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  • PostalWannabe
    commented on 's reply
    Definitely conflicted. But what better way to resolve important life questions than turning to strangers on the internet!?

    Yeah, the reality "push a patrol car for a few years, get assigned to a gang squad for a few years, get promoted to Sgt., get assigned to admin services, blah blah blah, then retire." is my biggest concern about making the jump.

    I think I just need to be patient. I'm still in the process for postal and just applied to FBI a month ago. If those (or other fed agencies) don't pan out then I can start considering other options.

  • Ratatatat
    replied
    This is the type of work I have always wanted to do, but lately I'm getting restless behind the desk. I would rather be out in the field solving the case than dealing with the court system after the fact
    .

    The point of this post is to get people's opinions on going the local LEO route. If I want to work financial crimes specifically, how doable is that?


    I don't think I'm "above" doing patrol work, but if my goal is detective work and I am nearing my mid-30s then I need to get a move on.
    Hmmm... I think you are somewhat conflicted about what you want to do with yourself and your career.....

    You wish to get away from desk work and dealing with the courts (which is totally understandable) but specifically want to work financial crimes? Well, if there is a job in LE with less desk time than financial crime, I don't know about it.....

    And you are 35 (or about) thinking about going local LE... with the goal of working financial crime as a detective someday? It just doesn't chart that way... you would push a patrol car for a few years, get assigned to a gang squad for a few years, get promoted to Sgt., get assigned to admin services, blah blah blah, then retire.

    Any other general advice on making the switch, or reasons not to?
    I would think long and seriously about leaving a job you've spent many years training for and dropping into a world which: 1) may bring the exact same frustrations you currently are challenged by, namely being chained to a desk for 50 hours a week and dealing with the courts, or 2) you become a cop believing you will be a financial crimes detective in five years- but the reality is greater you'll be assigned to the commercial vehicle traffic unit in five years.

    THAT SAID...if you really want to walk away from tasseled shoes and ABA dues, go HSI, FBI, IRS, or one of the OIGs. Clock is ticking though... on your 37th birthday, you become a toad.




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