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  • #16
    Ratatatat's three simple keys to success with the premier LE job in the greater Milky Way galaxy:


    1. Arrive angry. On your very first day, bring your best bad attitude. Walk into the room with a scowl on your face and the demeanor of a puff adder. While all the other new hires are grinning and greeting, giddy with excitement about how they landed their dream job, you're broadcasting what you are: a different animal, not to be trifled with. And you sense something amongst the managers in the room: they are scanning the crowd of new faces looking for who will be the future leaders. To them, anger equals strength and how you present yourself the first day will determine how far up the hierarchy of power you will climb.

    2. Go to HQ ASAP. Now let's say you know nothing about LE or wildlife. Your basic investigative skills are weak and you couldn't tell the difference between a widgeon and a wildebeest if they were both defecating on your dining room table. You barely make it through FTO but since they never fire anyone during FTO, you'll manage to get by a few more years without much scrutiny by changing duty stations every two years, which is smart because no expects a whole lot from someone always moving around.

    But, since you've established a poor reputation early in your career, you will forever be branded as zero unless you do one thing: go to DC as a desk agent. They always have a hard time getting field-oriented people to go there and DC is to poor agents what the River Jordan was to first century Christians: where sins get washed away and you emerge a new person. Twenty-three months later, you walk out those doors for the last time, newly crowned a supervisor. And for all intent and purposes, you are untouchable, much like a made man in a Martin Scorsese movie.

    3. Let the Little People Know who they are. To your new subordinates, you are the classic pyscho boss from hell. But if you've learned one thing by now, it's that who controls the narrative controls destiny. So every chance you can, you document every slight, mistake, miscue, and misstep, real or imagined. Your goal is to create a long running narrative that paints them as worthless piles of wormsh*t and you as the righteous guardian of integrity (even though you have very little of that yourself). Now add anger, the same anger you brought that very first day. Upper management recalls that new agent who had the scowl. But they've forgotten (or forgiven) about your non-production and the chaos and discord sowed everywhere you go. As far as feckless upper management is concerned, you are a hard charger who demands accountability, and that's all that matters.


    This, class, is how to succeed without ever making a decent case, or knowing the slightest about the subject matter....
    It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

    -Julius Ceasar

    Comment


    • Black Ops
      Black Ops commented
      Editing a comment
      This is 100% accurate. Lol

    • pn3karr
      pn3karr commented
      Editing a comment
      I believe this could be applied to most FLEO SA positions. Beatiful

    • 1cowboy
      1cowboy commented
      Editing a comment
      Very accurate post about federal law enforcement management across the board. Spot on.

  • #17
    Godlike-Monster-Art-Rhino.jpg
    It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

    -Julius Ceasar

    Comment


    • #18
      ...........,.
      Last edited by ACO88; 10-25-2018, 10:47 AM.

      Comment


      • #19
        Originally posted by ACO88 View Post
        ...........,.

        Deep and profound.
        It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

        -Julius Ceasar

        Comment


        • #20
          Donald Trump is nominating a former executive of agrochemical company Monsanto to run the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

          Aurelia Skipwith has been the deputy assistant secretary of fish, wildlife and parks for the interior department since April 2017. She is a lawyer and was in research for six years at Monsanto, where she led a team that brought new agricultural products to market, and then was in corporate affairs, according to her self-reported work history.

          https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...ior-department
          Appointing an agrochemical executive to run FWS is like appointing a big pharma executive to run the DEA.

          Good luck with that.
          It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

          -Julius Ceasar

          Comment


          • #21
            Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
            In the law enforcement career field, Is working out of a 1 man office, far away from any supervisors the best way to avoid most of the nonsense?

            Comment


            • #22
              If one is so fortunate....

              DON'T count on it though. These days, one man stations are the exception, not the rule.

              You'd think they'd be rewarded based on merit but that isn't always the case. Often they make convenient pigeon holes to shelve problems. Foul a relationship with a US Attorney's Office somewhere? Or irritate a state agency to the point they won't speak to you? Hey, about we quickly shuffle you to that open slot tucked away in the mountains that a dozen hard-working agents have been dreaming about for years....


              It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

              -Julius Ceasar

              Comment


              • #23
                Wouldn't that be FOWL up..?
                Now go home and get your shine box!

                Comment


                • Ratatatat
                  Ratatatat commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yuk yuk yuk

              • #24
                The panel will go though applications second week of December. The goal with this hiring was to get people with wildlife backgrounds and specifically game wardens, uniformed etc instead of FBI agents etc who just wanted a change of pace who come over and don’t care to protect the resource or don’t have that background and experience. It’s a good gig. Applicants will only be going to bigger offices (ports) or multi agent duty stations. September is a hard date for CITP and SABS after. They will be opening transfers supposedly prior to assigning duty stations so locations are unknown as of yet. That being said some of what Ratatat said is true but every outfit I ever worked for has their own issues. Considering you can make 13 and not work 100 hours a week like other outfits is a plus. I guess I have been lucky. Always worked in two or one man offices and my supervision was always accommodating.
                Last edited by airisfine; 10-31-2018, 11:17 PM.

                Comment


                • #25
                  I applied for this job but not sure if based on what your saying Im what they are looking for. I’m currently a patrol officer in major Metropolitan Area and have B.S in CJ. Only background I have in wildlife is hunting which I started doing 3 years ago.

                  How many guys are they looking to hire?

                  Comment


                  • Ratatatat
                    Ratatatat commented
                    Editing a comment
                    The good news, based on your background, is your chance of getting hired is less than 1 percent.

                    As far as the hunting aspect, that means absolutely nothing on a resume. In all candor, if you were to try and capitalize on being a hunter on your resume or in an interview, it would backfire. Keep in mind most agents with this outfit do not have that in their background (you might think the job would attract people who hunt but many were inspectors at airports, many just wanted an 1811 job, some even are card-carrying PETA members). If anything, hunters are somewhat looked down, as barbaric rubes who frequently poach or skirt the rules.

                    Another reason why most agents don't hunt is practicality for employment. The outfit is very draconian about one thing: wildlife violations. Your career would survive a DUI in your G-ride with your gun under the seat (has happened) but heaven forbid you get a ticket for possessing a speckled sea trout 1/4" under the slot limit. Many agents who were hunters or fisherman have quit, just to avoid complications.

                    So if you really like to hunt, and tell hunting stories at work without the boss and co-workers looking down their noses at you, be thankful your application will be placed on the No pile...

                • #26
                  The goal with this hiring was to get people with wildlife backgrounds and specifically game wardens
                  Applicants will only be going to bigger offices
                  Think long and hard about giving up the freedom and independence inherent with being a game warden for the ball and chain of a desk.

                  s
                  ome of what Ratatat said is true
                  How about you parse out for the class what is not true then?

                  every outfit I ever worked for has their own issues
                  True, but there are certain dynamics in play that amplify the issues ten fold, such as institutional arrogance, protecting the power structure at nearly all cost, and a bizarre cult-like sense of identity and purpose.

                  I guess I have been lucky. Always worked in two or one man offices and my supervision was always accommodating.

                  Lucky you, indeed. How many others can't say that though?
                  It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

                  -Julius Ceasar

                  Comment


                  • #27
                    Considering you can make 13
                    Not automatically though. Only if they really really like you.

                    and not work 100 hours a week like other outfits
                    Now you're just being silly.

                    It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

                    -Julius Ceasar

                    Comment


                    • #28
                      White House concerned Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke violated federal rules

                      The White House is growing increasingly concerned about allegations of misconduct against Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, according to two senior administration officials, and President Trump has asked aides for more information about a Montana land deal under scrutiny by the Justice Department.

                      Trump told his aides that he is afraid Zinke has broken rules while serving as the interior secretary and is concerned about the Justice Department referral, according to the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the matter. But the president has not indicated whether he will fire the former Navy SEAL and congressman and has asked for more information, the officials said.

                      This week, Interior’s Office of Inspector General referred the inquiry — one of several probes into the secretary’s conduct — to the Justice Department to determine whether a criminal investigation is warranted. That referral concerns Zinke’s involvement in a Whitefish, Mont., land development deal backed by David J. Lesar, chairman of the oil services firm Halliburton.

                      https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.8ad6f29a6ad8
                      Two generations of humans have killed off more than half the world’s wildlife populations, report finds

                      Human activity has annihilated wildlife on a scale unseen beyond mass extinction, and it has helped put humans on a potentially irreversible path toward a hot, chaotic planet stripped clean of the natural resources that enrich it, a new reporthas concluded.

                      Populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians have declined by 60 percent since 1970, according to a report released Monday by the advocacy group World Wildlife Fund. The animals that remain will fight against warming oceans choked with plastic, toppled rain forests may zero out fragile species, and refuges such as coral reefs may nearly die off.

                      https://www.washingtonpost.com/scien...=.be2f90f204bb

                      A couple of thoughts come to mind. One, give credit where credit is due: at least DOI-OIG recognizes what integrity is....

                      Second, on Day One at the academy, the indoctrination begins: You are the tip of the spear of wildlife LE. You are the best of the best. You are the thin green line that'll be the difference between extinction or viable populations....

                      The reality is big factors are at play which you have no control over, such as billions of people exploiting dwindling resources, rapidly warming oceans, unrelenting degradation by invasive species, and political interferences which favor money over wildlife.

                      Don't believe the hype that your awesomeness is gonna shift the scale one grain of sand....
                      It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

                      -Julius Ceasar

                      Comment


                      • #29
                        Academia is a cult

                        As a teenager growing up in the Living Word Fellowship, an international Christian organization widely regarded as a cult, I aspired to be a writer. Instead, I spent seven days a week at church: It was where I worshiped, socialized, ate, volunteered and even went to school. One summer, at the fellowship’s “School of Prophets” camp in rural Iowa, a senior pastor took his turn at the pulpit to encourage the youth of the congregation to skip college, work for the church and live in one of its communal homes in Hawaii or Brazil, which many in my graduating class went on to do. My parents, who joined the cult as graduate students in the 1970s but have recently left, were an educated anomaly in a culture that valued faith over reason. I’m grateful for my father, who in passing later that day told the pastor in seriousness disguised as joviality, “Stay away from my kids.”

                        I “blew out” of the cult — to use its own lingo for leaving — after my senior year to attend a Catholic university 20 miles away. I still read the Apostle Paul, but Jane Austen and James Joyce, too. Then I earned a PhD in English at the University of Minnesota, where I rehearsed Marx’s and Freud’s critiques of religion. Simmering with smug resentment, I was certain that I, an intellectual, was on the right side of history, a sworn opponent of the oppressive ideologies I ascribed to organized religion.

                        But I had to climb only so far up the ivory tower to recognize patterns of abuse that I thought — in my new, secular life — I had left behind. Because academia, I slowly realized, is also a cult.

                        Cults are systems of social control. They are insular but often evangelical organizations whose aims (be they money, power, sex or something else) are rooted in submission to a dogma manifested by an authority figure: a charismatic preacher or, say, a tenured professor. The relationship between shepherd and sheep is couched in unwavering commitment to a supposedly noble, transcendent cause. For the Living Word Fellowship, that meant “the Lordship of Jesus Christ”; for academia, “the production of knowledge.” In both cases, though, faith ultimately amounts to mastering the rules of the leaders, whose infallibility — whether by divine right or endowed chair — excuses all else.

                        Looking back, the evidence was everywhere: I’d seen needless tears in the eyes of classmates, harangued in office hours for having the gall to request a letter of recommendation from an adviser. Others’ lives were put on hold for months or sometimes years by dissertation committee members’ refusal to schedule an exam or respond to an email. I met the wives and girlfriends of senior faculty members, often former and sometimes current advisees, and heard rumors of famed scholars whisked abroad to sister institutions in the wake of grad student affairs gone awry. I’d first come in contact with such unchecked power dynamics as a child, in the context of church. In adulthood, as both a student and an employee of a university, I found myself subject to them once again.

                        https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlo...=.b01cf8841c56


                        Interesting article in this morning's Wash Post about the parallels between religious cults and academia. While reading it, several aspects rang true about FWS-OLE:

                        Insular organization (OLE is very much this).

                        Submission to a dogma manifested by an authority figure (don't ever ever question your supervisor).

                        Unwavering commitment to a noble, transcendent cause (many times will you hear self-aggrandizing little idioms like "there is no more noble cause than protecting that which cannot protect itself").

                        Unchecked power dynamics. Check.

                        And I submit this: the inability to self-reflect, or solicit critical thought when people leave. I suspect when people leave the Church of Scientology, no one asks them 'why'. And what's the one thing the 30% of people who have left OLE since 2001 (look at the class photos in the hallowed halls at Glynco and you'll see this figure is accurate) have in common? No one asked them 'why'.

                        Consider this: if you ever worked at McDonalds, or Taco Bell, and then quit, they give you a form to fill out before you get your last paycheck. If you've ever worked at a summer camp for three months, at the end of the season they ask how things could be better run. Heck, professional employers even require an exit interview with HR as part of the process.

                        Mostly, those forms and interviews are simply a bureaucratic HR machination, but at least it's an opportunity to allow for peons to explain their reason for jumping ship, and perhaps illuminate issues within the organization that need addressing, like a grossly unfit first line supervisor.

                        Not with OLE. When you announce you are 'blowing out', your email is immediately shutdown (noooo way are you sending out an unwanted and inconvenient explanation as to what the deal is). After handing in your gear, there will be no contact from HR or upper management. You are abruptly shown the door by a Machiavellian manager who now controls 100% of the narrative- your narrative- on why you left. No one will question further.

                        Exactly like a cult.



                        It is not the well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and hungry-looking.

                        -Julius Ceasar

                        Comment


                        • raptor170
                          raptor170 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Someone really hates this agency, huh?

                      • #30
                        Can anyone with some insight evaluate my chances? It seems like it’s going to be tough for non-game wardens.

                        I am not a sworn officer but I work for a state agency as an environmental investigator. I investigate violations of federal laws like clean water act and RCRA. Essentially a lot of illegal dumping of hazardous waste/oil and burial of solid waste. I’ve been to FLETC classes in Glynco put on by EPA and have worked with US fish and wildlife in cases that affected wildlife. My BS is in environmental science but I also served 4 years in the Marine Corps where I did a lot of law enforcement type roles on deployments.

                        Im hoping they’ll be interested in my background but after reading some of this I’m not so sure.

                        Comment


                        • warrior1978
                          warrior1978 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I think your resume is solid and should get you to an interview.

                        • Ratatatat
                          Ratatatat commented
                          Editing a comment
                          ^You have some valid inside insight here or is your bunion telling you that?

                          This ain't the Michigan DNR with a civil service process where high test scores get the interview. This is a hiring panel that makes objective AND subjective choices about who gets the golden ticket. 1,000 applicants, 100 interviews, 24 slots. So it's very easy to put highly qualified people on the No pile, especially if they aren't on the friends and family plan or have the hot new skillset for the hot new program emphasis (oil pit work is soooo 1999).

                        • warrior1978
                          warrior1978 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I do have valid inside insight to say I think their background should be good enough to get an interview. You are completely wrong to suggest that most applicants get hired based on inside biased connections.

                        • Ratatatat
                          Ratatatat commented
                          Editing a comment
                          Completely wrong? You sure about that, BE?

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