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  • What do you tell your employer?

    What do you tell your employer when you keep needing days off for steps of the LE hiring process?
    Does everyone call out sick/personal day?

  • #2
    It all depends on the agency/company you work for. If you work for one of those places that you feel people may retaliate against you for seeking other employment opportunities than it’s frankly none of their concern what you use annual leave for. However if your in one of those really relaxed and cool Google type of workplaces and your bosses are all about career advancement than I would be honest and let them know that your currently in the hiring process for multiple agencies and what it is required. I can remember having a really cool boss when I first decided to go into Federal LE. I applied with every agency under the moon which means multiple Testings ETC. And I was honest he let me attend even letting me take some leave without pay on one occasion so I wouldn’t deplete my annual leave in case I needed it later on .

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    • #3
      In my case, I used accumulated paid time off without informing my employer of what I was doing. At the time I was angling for a promotion and didn't feel they needed to know I was considering leaving the organization. Once I reached the point of the background, I informed them because I knew my investigator would be reaching out to them and I preferred they learned about it from me than to come completely out of the blue.

      As it turned out, my boss was really cool about it as he was one of those 'you should do what makes you happy' sorts.
      Last edited by orangebottle; 07-21-2018, 11:57 AM.

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      • #4
        Really depends on your boss and your organization. Gotta make the read as to whether your boss will/won’t be cool with it. Also gotta think big picture and discern whether your boss has enough say and latitude to keep you safe. Your boss might be a great guy/gal, but they won’t stick their neck out for you if their job is on the line.

        You get in an extended background and you’re trying to figure out how to justify staying employed a year into your BI.

        Once it comes out tho, honesty is usually the best policy, coupled with gratitude for letting you stay.

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        • #5
          This is a tricky situation that one must be smart about.

          Never lie or be deceitful (i.e.- use sick time for interview day. Bosses can become very vindictive when they figure out an employee is leaving and the last thing you want is a fresh disciplinary action for misuse of leave in your personnel file).


          But should you fully reveal your plans when that could potentially hurt you?

          My advice (having been in this situation a time or two):

          -Keep your plans to yourself and your pillow.

          -Don't tell them you are in the process of getting a new job until you have the final offer (disregard the 'tentative offer'. That means maybe six months from now).

          -I've seen numerous people get vary far in the process, to the point where they think it's certain, only to have the carpet pulled out at the last minute (often for reasons they have control over, like a sudden budget cut, or a previously unknown medical condition).

          -When you do leave, be professional, even if others show their arses. Don't take the bait and go out in a ball of flames.

          -Recognize that a quarter of hires don't make it to the one year point, and returning to the former job maybe the best or only option.

          I used to be a banker but I lost interest.

          -Steven Wright

          Comment


          • Sheridan1
            Sheridan1 commented
            Editing a comment
            Kinda hard to not tell them you're in the process of a new job when the background investigation involves interviewing coworkers and supervisors in person lol.

            Also, a quarter of new hires don't make it to the 1 year point? What agency is that? Source?

          • Ratatatat
            Ratatatat commented
            Editing a comment
            RE: BI involving coworkers and supervisor. Yes, by then the cat is out of the bag. Many agencies will put off current employer until the very end of the BI process specifically to avoid workplace issues for the candidates.

            RE: 25% loss/one year. This issue has been studied quite a bit. Feel free to get in the weeds with the statistical analysis in the reports identified below. Some consistent national averages:
            -The attrition rate is 14% for veteran officers.
            -For every 100 people who start the academy, about 90 finish (my unscientific experience is more than 10% don't complete academy, but let's stick with the what the experts are reporting).
            -An attrition rate of 25% during FTO is considered normal.

            So, if we do the simple math (100 - 10 = 90, then 90 x .75 = 67), of the 100 people who entered the academy, 67 make it past FTO. That would be an attrition rate of 33% for new hires. I stand corrected.

            https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/105574.pdf
            https://www.urban.org/sites/default/...e-Agencies.PDF
            https://www.rand.org/content/dam/ran...RAND_MG959.pdf

        • #6
          Sheridan1 I totally agree with you about the background investigator issues ... however with the Federal Government unless your with one of those rare federal agencies that completes its own background your background packet gets forwarded to OPM where it can take up to a year after the hiring agency submits your background before the Background Investigator touches it to even start your background. So I can understand how some recruits can be hesitant about when to tell an employer about there future employment plans, as being labeled the “guy/gal who’s leaving “ for 1.5 -2 years, all while being passed up over training, given crappy assignments taken off cases ETC can be no fun. Again these time frames are rare for local law enforcement but pretty common in Federal Law Enforcement.
          Last edited by antonioakatrell; 07-23-2018, 09:41 AM.

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          • #7
            I kept it quiet until absolutely necessary. I work in a really competitive field, so, as soon as I let my employer know that I was looking elsewhere for employment the knives would come out. Now, my immediate supervisor was in the loop throughout the process because I knew I could trust him, but, that is after three years of knowing and working with the guy. I only told my wife that I was actually pursuing the job. You never know who would love to ruin your career because of a stupid facebook post from 10 years ago.

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            • #8
              Originally posted by Schwook View Post
              I kept it quiet until absolutely necessary. I work in a really competitive field, so, as soon as I let my employer know that I was looking elsewhere for employment the knives would come out. Now, my immediate supervisor was in the loop throughout the process because I knew I could trust him, but, that is after three years of knowing and working with the guy. I only told my wife that I was actually pursuing the job. You never know who would love to ruin your career because of a stupid facebook post from 10 years ago.
              You guys aren’t answering my question. All I want to know is what you’re telling your employer when you need those days off for the hiring process.

              Comment


              • B O Double
                B O Double commented
                Editing a comment
                Just be honest so that your integrity isn’t compromised. You know your employer far better than anyone here.
                Last edited by B O Double; 07-23-2018, 05:09 PM.

              • Sheridan1
                Sheridan1 commented
                Editing a comment
                Have you not taken days off before? What's the issue?

              • Schwook
                Schwook commented
                Editing a comment
                Tell your employer that you're taking a personal day or whatever. Feel it out. We don't know what the dynamic is between you and your boss so we're giving general advice.

            • #9
              Originally posted by Tommy_V View Post

              You guys aren’t answering my question. All I want to know is what you’re telling your employer when you need those days off for the hiring process.
              I think we are answering your question but your missing the point people are trying to make in a long winded roundabout way haha.The point is that depending on the work dynamics people are either being honest with their employer I.E “ Hey(enter supervisor) I have an appointment on (Enter Date) for (Enter Agency) and would like to take annually leave for it “ or if it’s someplace they can’t reveal their employment plans for fear of retaliation it’s “ Hey (enter supervisor) I really need time off for (enter whatever excuse you want that doesn’t reveal you are seeking employment and isn’t going to get you in trouble or put you in a situation where your going to put yourself in bad situation ethically )”
              Last edited by antonioakatrell; 07-23-2018, 04:16 PM.

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              • #10
                Originally posted by Tommy_V View Post

                You guys aren’t answering my question. All I want to know is what you’re telling your employer when you need those days off for the hiring process.
                Sorry.

                ME: Hey, Boss, I'll be out next Tuesday.

                BOSS: M'kay.


                Comment


                • Schwook
                  Schwook commented
                  Editing a comment
                  To my knowledge, it's none of their business why you're out. As long you're using your personal days in accordance with their company guidelines, I don't see the rub.

              • #11
                It depends on the rapport you have with your supervisor. My supervisor is cool and he kind of knew I was going to leave; it was just a matter of time. I’d always try to schedule my appointments on my days off. If not I’d just straight up tell him, I’d like to use leave on this day(s) so I can do whatever with this agency. Most of the time he would or he’d just switch my off days. If he couldn’t, he’d hint at me using sick leave. He said you do what you need to do.

                Comment


                • CSUAlum
                  CSUAlum commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yeah this is spot on... it really depends on who you work for and how they feel about you leaving. I’ve been able to schedule most stuff on days off and swap shifts as well. Only used leave once or twice.

              • #12
                Originally posted by Tommy_V View Post

                You guys aren’t answering my question. All I want to know is what you’re telling your employer when you need those days off for the hiring process.
                Tell ‘um you have a secret identity and secret life as a superhero. Let him know that you sometimes need days off to recover from the time you spend saving the world.

                If he asks what superhero, tell him “[email protected]$$” or something catchy. Gotta make the story really juicy as to ensure that the boss wont’ get ******ed.

                Another option, go tell the boss that you are currently considering working in LE and are in the hiring process, so days off are needed to complete certain portions of the hiring process. If he cans you the next day, let your recruiter and BI know you got canned for applying to be a cop. It will show you’re dedicated to the job and not afraid of being totally and completely truthful with people despite the possibility of adverse circumstances.
                Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

                Comment


                • #13
                  As some have stated. Days off or prior, after your current shift. If not, take off. You will have to tell them at some point as to the BI.
                  "whys the sky blue? because god loves the Infantry"

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Originally posted by HI629 View Post

                    Tell ‘um you have a secret identity and secret life as a superhero. Let him know that you sometimes need days off to recover from the time you spend saving the world.

                    If he asks what superhero, tell him “[email protected]$$” or something catchy. Gotta make the story really juicy as to ensure that the boss wont’ get ******ed.

                    Another option, go tell the boss that you are currently considering working in LE and are in the hiring process, so days off are needed to complete certain portions of the hiring process. If he cans you the next day, let your recruiter and BI know you got canned for applying to be a cop. It will show you’re dedicated to the job and not afraid of being totally and completely truthful with people despite the possibility of adverse circumstances.
                    Agree 110% with HI629

                    Comment


                    • HI629
                      HI629 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Lots of ways to make fast cash on the up and up. A kid I’m mentoring just got canned for joining the military. He went to give his boss notice because he ships in 3 months, yet the boss told him his services were no longer needed and took him off of the schedule. I thought it was pretty cool that he was giving the boss 3 months to find a suitable replacement. Guess I was wrong.

                      Kid didn’t freak or mope around. He signed up to drive for Lyft and Uber. He clears $200 a day, gets paid weekly, or can cash out daily for a small fee. Glad he was able to find a new source of income on such a short notice! More free time, make your own hours, AND making more than when he had to for his former employer.

                    • 221bBaker
                      221bBaker commented
                      Editing a comment
                      HI629 - sounds like your mentee's former employer committed a serious USERRA violation. But good on the kid for making the best of it!

                    • Schwook
                      Schwook commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Literally illegal to fire someone for serving their country. That kid's boss is a ******.

                    • HI629
                      HI629 commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yeah, former boss was an @$$. Dunno how he’s still in business.

                  • #15
                    Oops! post.
                    Last edited by HI629; 08-03-2018, 05:38 PM. Reason: Meant to leave a comment, posted a reply instead.
                    Getting shot hurts! Don't under estimate the power of live ammo. A .22LR can kill you! I personally feel that it's best to avoid being shot by any caliber. Your vest may stop the bullet, but you'll still get a nice bruise or other injury to remember the experience.

                    Comment

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