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USSS Experience? Whats the job like??

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  • USSS Experience? Whats the job like??

    Okay, in order to get rid of the sarcastic answers such as "well its protection work so its boring..." I am looking for in depth stuff.

    I have recently heard that all new agents are assigned to a field office for almost 10 years before they go to the protection details. Is this true?

    Whats the moral like?

    Is it constant training and supplementing the PPD or are they doing actual complex investigations as well?

    Do all agents have to rotate to the protection side of the house?

    How do they assign your location out of FLETC?

    etc etc etc

    I would love to hear from current SAs if there are any out there.

    Thanks in advance, looking forward to learning.
    FBI
    applied-09/30/18
    phase 1 test-10/22/18
    meet and greet-11/06/18
    judged competitive-11/14/18
    Phase 2 written-12/8/18

    ATF
    applied-11/02/17
    Entry test-03/04/18
    PTT-07/13/18
    Interview-11/15/18

  • #2
    The in-depth responses, or lack thereof, should give you some perspective. Kidding

    I spoke with a 15 year veteran agent a few months ago. Basically, he said the morale sucks. You’re assigned to some random office out of FLETC (with no regard to family or personal situation - since you would sign a mobility agreement). You stay there for 4-5 years in investigative capacity then sent to DC for protective detail for another 4-5 years. Then would return to investigations, doing protection one month a year. I may or may not be 100% on the latter part.

    Thats all all I got. Hope it helped.
    Last edited by Smilingsmokey; 03-19-2018, 02:11 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Lol. Thats what I was afraid of. Im sure the rookies get assigned to protection details often right out of FLETC which seems to me counter intuitive. Thanks for your reply sir.

      FBI
      applied-09/30/18
      phase 1 test-10/22/18
      meet and greet-11/06/18
      judged competitive-11/14/18
      Phase 2 written-12/8/18

      ATF
      applied-11/02/17
      Entry test-03/04/18
      PTT-07/13/18
      Interview-11/15/18

      Comment


      • #4
        That’s incorrect information. Your duration in DC on protection is much longer than that. I wish it was 4-5. And u will never be assigned to a protection detail as a newbie.
        Last edited by Black Ops; 03-19-2018, 07:20 PM.

        Comment


        • money_mike
          money_mike commented
          Editing a comment
          So would it be accurate and or fair to say that out of FLETC, you would be expected to conduct investigations only until you had a bit of experience? If so, then Im assuming that you would still get assigned to protection TDYs etc etc to augment the PPD as needed.

          Im just trying to figure out if I can realistically expect 6-8 years in a field office/investigations role prior to transferring to full time protection division in DC.

      • #5
        I can’t speak from a USSS perspective, but I can from that of a state agency that does the same thing.
        1. You must wake up, get cleaned up, dressed and be ready to go before your protectee even wakes up.
        2. You won’t go home until after you put your protectee to bed. Consider how many hours a politician puts in each day and that will give you an idea of how much sleep you won’t get.
        3. You will pay meticulous attention in formulating the details for your protectee’s security plans for travel, events, etc., ensuring everything runs like a precision watch. Yet, some bozo on the detail, or your protectee him/herself, or unforeseen circumstances will always screw those plans up, totally negating whatever protection you had in place. Carry a big bottle of Maalox with you to soothe the ulcer you will soon develop and embrace the phrase, “It will all collapse into place.”
        4. Be prepared to spend endless (mindless) hours on room watch, car watch, house watch, (and occasionally mistress watch) where you are so bored to tears that you are tempted to play games on your cellphone, or read a magazine, or find some other diversion to keep from going nuts, but know you can’t, because diverting your attention could allow a bad guy to sneak up and successfully attack whatever or whoever you are protecting.
        5. Understand that being in close proximity to your protectee and his family, all day, every day, for weeks and months on end, exposes all of you to each other’s quirks and habits. If there is something about one of you that annoys the other, it can become grating after a while. Don’t get butt hurt if you get bounced off the detail because someone found you cologne offensive, or didn’t like your selection of ties, or you failed to hold a door open for someone.
        6. Security plans sometimes conflict with operational needs of the protectee’s staff. Learn how to deal with attempts by staff to interfere with and countermand established security plans.
        7. Sometimes protectee’s staff will attempt to involve themselves in security operations, dictate their terms and supervise a movement or operation. (There’s nothing more dangerous that a 24 year old civilian intern on the Protectee’s staff who just got his bachelor’s degree and has a walkie talkie in his hand.) Be prepared to diplomatically put these people in their place and remind them who is in charge of dignitary protection.
        8. If your Protectee travels the country or the world, you will go with him. But your time will be spent on room watch, car watch or with the protectee, with only a few hours left for you to sleep. The only time you will have to see these exotic places will be from the plane as you land and take off.
        9. You will accompany your protectee to many rubber chicken banquets where you will be given banquet tickets as well. Sumptuous meals will be served. If you are smart, you will give your tickets to the Local PD liaison officers who assisted you in doing your advance, while you grab a quick snack from the kitchen or go without food. If you eat a big meal you will start to doze off later during the security movement and be less attentive, plus, the local cops will love you for the banquet tickets and go well out of the way to help the next time you are in town and need help.
        10. Because of your protectee’s hours, your life will not be your own. If you have a family. They and your relationship with them will suffer. Do your time on the protective detail so it will round out your resume and then move on to something else.
        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • chipperjones
          chipperjones commented
          Editing a comment
          Omg that sounds awful and for a state agency? What state has politicians that need round the clock protection?

        • L-1
          L-1 commented
          Editing a comment
          There are several states where the governor and other constitutional officers may have 24 hour protection. A lot depends on the number of threats made against the individual and the credibility of those threats.

      • #6
        If you want to get a slight taste of the job: go suit up, and stand in front of a closet door, staring at it for 8 hours.

        Halls and Walls.
        Now go home and get your shine box!

        Comment


        • GoldBadge
          GoldBadge commented
          Editing a comment
          Or stand by a dumpster near a hotel in a suit and pass time by counting the rats.

        • CCCSD
          CCCSD commented
          Editing a comment
          Nailed it! That’s the fun part!

      • #7
        ^Spot on. I would add:

        1. You can experience what protection is like in the comfort of your own apartment. At midnight tonight, put on a suit and tie and your stiffest shoes. Then go stand in a dank stairwell or parking garage. Or pretend your apartment is the Executive Suite at the Hilton and stand in front of the door. Every hour, switch out with yourself. No thumbing your phone looking at funny memes. Just standing, making sure no unauthorized parties get close. Do this for 12 hours and then repeat the next night and the next night and the next night.

        Last edited by Ratatatat; 04-07-2018, 09:46 PM.
        One day, lad, this will all be yours.

        Comment


        • #8
          Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
          ^Spot on. I would add:

          1. You can experience what protection is like in the comfort of your own apartment. At midnight tonight, put on a suit and tie and your stiffest shoes. Then go stand in a dank stairwell or parking garage. Or pretend your apartment is the Executive Suite at the Hilton and stand in front of the door. Every hour, switch out with yourself. No thumbing your phone looking at funny memes. Just standing, making sure no unauthorized parties get close. Do this for 12 hours and then repeat the next night and the next night and the next night..
          Ahhhh, this takes me back to my Uniformed Division days when I worked a relatively small event for Dick Cheney and spent 14 hours in a hotel stairwell only being relieved to use the restroom maybe twice and then 30 minutes to grab a quick bite to eat. Standing in a stairwell for that long really starts to feel like you are actually in solitary confinement (or so I would imagine).

          Comment


          • #9
            There's lots of little tricks you learn to keep from getting too miserable doing protection work. Like the value of Dr. Scholls Custom Orthotic inserts, aka the best $49.99 you'll ever spend....

            It can become solitary confinement, day after day or night after night of standing there. Whenever I got saddled with protection work, I would find little mind games to keep from going batty, like counting the number of tiny paint specks on the wall in front of me. I would start with per square inch, then try to come up with an estimate of the number of tiny specks on the entire wall. So, for instance, if there were 50 tiny specks in a single square inch, that means approximately 7,200 specks in a square foot. If the wall was 10' high by 100' long, then it was 1,000 square feet. So were talking 7,200,000 tiny specks in total. You can also build your dream log cabin mansion in your mind, imagining every piece of ponderosa pine and juniper.

            Come up with lists, like name your five favorite Bradley Cooper movies: American Sniper. American Hustle. Guardians of the Galaxy. The Hangover. And the deeply underrated War Dogs. Or name your three favorite former girlfriends. And your three least favorite. Name your five favorite experiences in life. And your five worst. Name the most beautiful places you've seem. And the ugliest. The topics can be endless and can keep you from dying from boredom as you stand there hour after friggin' hour, day after friggin' day.
            One day, lad, this will all be yours.

            Comment


            • #10
              PM'd with actual 1st hand experience. Many of the comments here are way off. I have never stood next to a dumpster (although that's the running joke), I've also stood in a stairwell. Post Standing is a very small part of the job. Maybe 8-16 hours a month. You'll spend more time traveling to the place you need to stand at, then the actual standing.

              Investigations: if your motivated and willing to dig, the cases are there. I've charged 922g, title 21and even a 18 usc 111.

              time off: yea that's hit and miss. Big office? Like New York, good luck getting a weekend for 1st year.

              Moral: low but changes are being made, for the better? Remains to be seen.
              Last edited by DesertRat707; 03-23-2018, 02:55 PM.

              Comment


              • GoldBadge
                GoldBadge commented
                Editing a comment
                I've stood next to a dumpster (behind Hyatt in DC), in hallways, stairwells, and near close access doorways.

                The NYFO on Adams in Bklyn has several floors of cubes for line agents.

            • #11
              The comments about Halls and Walls and prep are spot on.
              Now go home and get your shine box!

              Comment


              • #12
                Originally posted by DesertRat707 View Post
                PM'd with actual 1st hand experience. Many of the comments here are way off. I have never stood next to a dumpster (although that's the running joke), I've also stood in a stairwell. Post Standing is a very small part of the job. Maybe 8-16 hours a month. You'll spend more time traveling to the place you need to stand at, then the actual standing.

                Investigations: if your motivated and willing to dig, the cases are there. I've charged 922g, title 21and even a 18 usc 111.

                time off: yea that's hit and miss. Big office? Like New York, good luck getting a weekend for 1st year.

                Moral: low but changes are being made, for the better? Remains to be seen.

                So you're saying you've never felt like this:


                Comment


                • #13
                  Originally posted by DesertRat707 View Post
                  Post Standing is a very small part of the job. Maybe 8-16 hours a month.
                  1. Except for 18 months every four years known as election season...

                  2. Except for three weeks every September in New York City....

                  Then it's 8-16 hours per day.....

                  One day, lad, this will all be yours.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    I have never stood next to a dumpster (although that's the running joke),
                    Some people live charmed lives is all I can say....

                    Others draw the short straw and get posted to the loading dock at the Marriott, in the rear alley where the dumpsters sit...

                    There's a faint but specific smell of rotting food that permeates one's suit after a week of 12 hour shifts that never totally goes away, despite the number of dry cleanings....
                    One day, lad, this will all be yours.

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      .............
                      Last edited by justonslc; 10-16-2018, 02:20 PM.

                      Comment

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