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  • Ncis

    Anyone gone through the NCIS Agent hiring process? I was thinking about applying. How is the job? I looked at their web page, looks pretty good.

  • #2
    Ncis

    I also have recently been applying for the NCIS. I just submitted my application SF-50 form and college transcripts. I have a background in journalism, sociology, criminal justice and law enforcement experience. I was also wondering if anyone had gone through the NCIS process?

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    • #3
      applied in 2005 by submitting my resume and didnt use the new online application. tested in November 2005 and passed. sent in some paperwork and didnt hear anything until this past week. will interview this week and hoping all goes well. good luck

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      • #4
        My process is going very fast since I am a Marine and work right next to the NCIS office. I sent my App in Aug 06 took the test in Sep 06, had my Pre Interview in Oct 06, and had the Oral Panel in Nov 06. I havent heard anything yet but no news is good news.

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        • #5
          For those of you in the NCIS hiring pool, here is some straight-forward advice and info:

          I've sat on a dozen hiring boards for NCIS. As a panel chairman, I look for several things - professional attire, professional attitude and a well-rounded person. Make sure you sell yourself during your pre-screening phase and in your paperwork, because the panel interview is very structured, and it's not an open forum during which you brag about yourself. You'll be answering specific questions for 2-4 hours about your family, your friends, previous employment, drug use, and education. And that's only half of the interview. You will also face 10 standard panel questions and a current events quiz.
          If you don't know the basics about world politics, the US government, the situation overseas, or who's who in the global war on terrorism, I'll give you a thumbs down. Pick up a USA today and take the time to understand the world around you. You may very well be assigned to a duty assignment in Iraq or Kuwait where your knowledge of the world around you may save the life of a deployed Marine or sailor.

          NCIS is very small - we only have 1200 agents worldwide. The FBI has over 3000 agents in NYC alone. Needless to say, due to our small size, we can afford to be picky, and will surely be looking for special skills to set you apart from the other applicants - intelligence background, foreign language skills, military service, law enforcement experience, forensics training, etc. You're competing against other former cops or military officers, or against college grads with triple degrees and the ability to speak 2 languages. So once again, sell yourself early and highlight what qualities YOU bring to the agency and how you will be an effective Special Agent. If you don't have at least one of the aforementioned qualifiers, it'll be a tough hill ahead of you.

          Remember - our three principal focus areas are preventing terrorism, reducing crime, and protecting secrets. It's not just about catching crooks these days. In addition to our normal criminal investigator duties, we serve as counter intelligence agents and can be assigned to conduct a variety of other duties, such as protective ops, foreign counterintelligence, or briefing commands on sexual assaults, domestic violence, or criminal and intel threats to the Department of the Navy.

          You have to be willing to accept a position doing things other than larceny, death or narcotics investigations. These positions include procurement fraud, research/tech protection duties, or another field that might not necessarily involve typical criminal investigations, such as a cyber examiner or technical services agent. As long as you remain flexible, can adapt ot changing situations, and are willing to deploy to locations such as Iraq, Afghanistan or Djibouti (or live full-time in an overseas location, such as Bahrain, Japan, or Eirope for 2-3 year tours within your first 5 years), NCIS is for you. Just make sure it's also something your family can handle. Moving every 2-3 years might appeal to you, but will your spouse and kids enjoy the same instability you thrive on?

          You will be expected to sign a mobility agreement and will most likely receive orders to an overseas location after your first couple of years on the job. You may never get back to your original duty station, or for that matter, to the coast you want to be on. You may be from Kentucky, but the closest you'll probably get is Washington DC. If your next move is to Guam, will you be ready to accept?

          Bottom line - it's a great job if you want to see the world, live overseas, and change discilpines every couple years. Just make sure you are willing to also accept travel and duty stations you may not find desirable from time to time. It will definitely be a job that will provide you with opportunities not available in any other federal law enforcement agency. Good luck.
          Last edited by keydet; 01-13-2007, 07:29 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by keydet
            For those of you in the NCIS hiring pool, here is some straight-forward advice and info:

            I've sat on a dozen hiring boards for NCIS. As a panel chairman, I look for several things - professional attire, professional attitude and a well-rounded person. Make sure you sell yourself during your pre-screening phase and in your paperwork, because the panel interview is very structured, and it's not an open forum during which you brag about yourself. You'll be answering specific questions for 2-4 hours about your family, your friends, previous employment, drug use, and education. And that's only half of the interview. You will also face 10 standard panel questions and a current events quiz.
            If you don't know the basics about world politics, the US government, the situation overseas, or who's who in the global war on terrorism, I'll give you a thumbs down. Pick up a USA today and take the time to understand the world around you. You may very well be assigned to a duty assignment in Iraq or Kuwait where your knowledge of the world around you may save the life of a deployed Marine or sailor.

            NCIS is very small - we only have 1200 agents worldwide. The FBI has over 3000 agents in NYC alone. Needless to say, due to our small size, we can afford to be picky, and will surely be looking for special skills to set you apart from the other applicants - intelligence background, foreign language skills, military service, law enforcement experience, forensics training, etc. You're competing against other former cops or military officers, or against college grads with triple degrees and the ability to speak 2 languages. So once again, sell yourself early and highlight what qualities YOU bring to the agency and how you will be an effective Special Agent. If you don't have at least one of the aforementioned qualifiers, it'll be a tough hill ahead of you.

            Remember - our three principal focus areas are preventing terrorism, reducing crime, and protecting secrets. It's not just about catching crooks these days. In addition to our normal criminal investigator duties, we serve as counter intelligence agents and can be assigned to conduct a variety of other duties, such as protective ops, foreign counterintelligence, or briefing commands on sexual assaults, domestic violence, or criminal and intel threats to the Department of the Navy.

            You have to be willing to accept a position doing things other than larceny, death or narcotics investigations. These positions include procurement fraud, research/tech protection duties, or another field that might not necessarily involve typical criminal investigations, such as a cyber examiner or technical services agent. As long as you remain flexible, can adapt ot changing situations, and are willing to deploy to locations such as Iraq, Afghanistan or Djibouti (or live full-time in an overseas location, such as Bahrain, Japan, or Eirope for 2-3 year tours within your first 5 years), NCIS is for you. Just make sure it's also something your family can handle. Moving every 2-3 years might appeal to you, but will your spouse and kids enjoy the same instability you thrive on?

            You will be expected to sign a mobility agreement and will most likely receive orders to an overseas location after your first couple of years on the job. You may never get back to your original duty station, or for that matter, to the coast you want to be on. You may be from Kentucky, but the closest you'll probably get is Washington DC. If your next move is to Guam, will you be ready to accept?

            Bottom line - it's a great job if you want to see the world, live overseas, and change discilpines every couple years. Just make sure you are willing to also accept travel and duty stations you may not find desirable from time to time. It will definitely be a job that will provide you with opportunities not available in any other federal law enforcement agency. Good luck.
            by far the best post i've seen on this site....i just completed my pre-screening and passed....out of all the 3 letter agencies out there, NCIS is the best fit for me and pray to get on board with your agency.... if you could confirm this, the agent who interviewed me told me that in 2007, the SABT classes have been cut down to two with 24 students per class. that leaves 48 for the year and there are already appr. 150 people in the pool awaiting classes. any truth to this? thanks

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            • #7
              I'm not sure if the exact number of classes will be two for the entire fiscal year, as classes are sometimes formed at the last minute. It is unlikely that more than 4 classes total would be held in a year. We just don't have that kind of turnover to hold that many classes per annum. Right now, there is a sizeable percentage of agents with less than 3 years left to retire. Vacancies will occur from those retirements, as well as an increase in agents from a slightly increased budget to combat the GWOT. Some of the increased billets will be non-1811 positions, such as support staff, etc. Between 2005-2007, a total of approx. 350 new hires, to include both 1811 and non-1811's were forcasted. The positions included a few new billets, as well as a number of new hires that would fill billets left vacant by those agents and support staff retiring and/or transferring to other agencies.

              The class average of 24 agents, give or take, is correct. Usually, a typical NCIS class will be a mixed class made up mostly of NCIS agents and a smattering of others, such as a handful from FDA, TVA, OSI, or Commerce Export Enforcement, to name a few. Usually beyween a 50/50 to 75/25 mix of NCIS to others.

              FYI - The hiring pool at HQ consists of candidates who've been given a "recommended" or "highly recommended" score from their panel interview. Unfortunately, this is not the last step in the selection process. There is one more step that does not involve the candidate or the field office panel members who interviewed the candidate. There is a HQ sponsored "paper board" comprised of 3 or more GS-14 or higher Special Agents from HQ who will make the final hiring determination.

              Once a class is ready to be formed, a "paper board" convenes at NCIS HQ to review a/the group of files from the available hiring pool. They will review all of the paperwork of the individual(s) being screened and will also review the results of the oral panel one last time. Although a candidate can be given a thumbs up by the interviewers and have their package sent to HQ with a "recommended" score, the "paper board" can potentially cut the candidate from the hiring pool, even if the candidate received a recommended score at the field office where he/she interviewed. It has happened in the past, though not often. Most panels will not tell the interviewee if he/she did well or poorly on their panel interview, as it may give them false hope that they are just waiting for a class to form, when in fact it is the ultimate decision of the convening paper board. It's basically a last minute QC check of the applicant.

              Once selected, a background investigation will be initiated and the closest field office nearest the applicant's residence will be contacted to initiate an NCIS background investigation. OPM will jump in at a later time to conduct a background inquiry for your security clearance. However, NCIS Special Agents (usually retired SA's who are rehired annuitants) will actually conduct your pre-hiring background for the job itself. They will visit your employer, family, neighbors, etc.

              You will usually report to your field office several weeks before FLETC starts and go through a pre-basic training evolution conducted by the field training coordinator at your particular field office. Meet and greet, learn some basics about NCIS, go over some military basics, and conduct an early prep for FLETC. Nothing hard. Gives most people a minimum time to take care of personal issues before heading to GA for several months.

              Good luck with your hiring process. Seems you have a bit longer to wait. Don;t rule out the other agencies out there. Each offers something different, and the important thing is to get your foot in the door. If NCIS doesn't offer you employment, don't take it personally - it's a tough line to get into. Just persevere, stay focused, and an agency will eventually come through. For now, keep your fingers crossed that NCIS will be that agency.

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              • #8
                thanks alot KEYDET. Thats what the agent told me as well. Very close for the ICE SA job but NCIS would be my preference. By far. Won't dwell on it as my clock has stopped with my current job and enjoy the work. get to do the docket work, fug ops, arrests, prosecutions. thanks again.

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                • #9
                  ................
                  Last edited by Saber5; 01-06-2020, 08:19 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by raven52 View Post
                    Anyone gone through the NCIS Agent hiring process? I was thinking about applying. How is the job? I looked at their web page, looks pretty good.
                    If you want that “status” and want to travel - it’s a great job! If you want to do real police work - other than busting boots for underage drinking and having orgies in the barracks; I’d probably look elsewhere.

                    I hear building bad cases against NSW is the cool thing, since they can’t touch the OGA’s. Anyways, best of luck on whatever you decide!

                    "The only easy day was yesterday"

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                    • #11
                      guys this thread is 13 years old....

                      Comment

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