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US Forest Service LEO's in Alaska

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  • US Forest Service LEO's in Alaska

    I see that the US Forest Service is hiring for Leo’s in Alaska. Anyone work for or know about the job as it would be performed in Sitka Alaska? It looks/sounds great but I’m betting everyone is going to apply making it hard to get on.
    In God we trust, everyone else we search!

  • #2
    I know your not supposed to add on to old threads but I am wondering the same exact question. The Sitka,AK position is open again for USFS LEO. I know in some agencies Alaska jobs are highly sought after, and others everyone wants to get out of there. Does anyone have any insight into how those within the USFS feel about Alaska? There is only about 9k people there any I believe only about 20 miles of roads so it's pretty small. Thanks for any info!

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    • #3
      Wow,

      I started this thread back in 2006. I think I can help you now. I was living in Alaska at the time I started this thread. I was working with a different Fed-agency then, but much is the same for all Fed jobs in Alaska. I work for the USFS in the lower 48 now.

      I have a buddy from FLETC that works in that area and likes it. BUT... he was a cop from that area before the USFS and lives hunting, fishing and is a boating guy and has his own boat. For him it is a great match. Alaska is love or hate. I loved it, my wife hated it, she won. I only lived in Alaska for a year before transferring to the lower 48 with a different fed agency(DOI).

      I can tell you that the USFS is a great job, and the best way into any fed job is be willing to take any location. As for Alaska, all LEO jobs can be tough to land. It took me five years and a bit of luck.
      In God we trust, everyone else we search!

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd take a good look at a couple of things before applying to these locations:

        1 - Look at living on an island. A ferry is required to get on and off Ketchikan by auto. The ferry ride isn't cheap. It's quite a long ferry ride to the main land. (6 or 7 hour ride..)

        2 - The crime rate of drunks, violence and suicides is off the charts for the cities. Per capita Ketchikan has a higher crime rate than Detroit. The depression rate is off the charts for island living like these 2 cities.

        I haven't lived there but I have a close friend who did. He warned me a few years ago to do some research when I was seeking a job in Ketchikan.

        Just my 2c
        Last edited by bigbauz; 07-26-2010, 10:13 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bigbauz View Post
          I'd take a good look at a couple of things before applying to these locations:

          1 - Look at living on an island. A ferry is required to get on and off Ketchikan by auto. The ferry ride isn't cheap. It's quite a long ferry ride to the main land. (6 or 7 hour ride..)

          2 - The crime rate of drunks, violence and suicides is off the charts for the cities. Per capita Ketchikan has a higher crime rate than Detroit. The depression rate is off the charts for island living like these 2 cities.

          I haven't lived there but I have a close friend who did. He warned me a few years ago to do some research when I was seeking a job in Ketchikan.

          Just my 2c
          I know what you mean. I am basically trying to get into a USFS LEO position so I have basically come to the point where I will accept any position, because the hard part is getting in and it's fairly easy to transfer. I know that there certainly won't be as many applicants as say Helena, Montana but since this is a natural resource law enforcement position there are going to be a lot of people applying who live to hunt and fish (like fivzog said) and Alaska is about the best place to be for hunting and fishing. Being a young single guy I definitely wont have any problems being there compared to the guys with a wife and kids.

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          • #6
            Anybody know if these two positions (Sitka & Ketchikan) are difficult (yes I know all USFS gigs are difficult) to get as a USFS LEO? Or are they a good starting location for a USFS LEO?

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            • #7
              I know and work with several USFS 1811's and LEO's, but I also happen to know a USFS LEO who was once stationed in Sitka.

              Remember that virtually all of SE Alaska is part of the Tongass National Forest. Well, it's all either NF land or glacier (glaciers are what keep SE Alaska isolated/cut off from automobile traffic). He worked a lot of sport fishing, hunting (especially bears), and essentially all of the other stuff that UFSF LEOs work: drugs and crimes within the NF. Some things pretty cool; some things probably not as fun - like any federal agency.

              As for the ferry.... At either duty station you will essentially be traveling on an EXTREMELY limited auto route. The city I lived in had 27 miles of roads. Sitka and Ketchikan are both smaller. So if it's a gov't-paid move (which I assume it is), you'll get on the ferry in Bellingham, WA with your car, spend a couple of days getting to either, then drive around in circles for X years... OK, it's not THAT bad, but the cabin fever can make it seem that way sometimes. Google the Alaska Marine Highway for details on the ferry. Housing is also very limited. I knew an agent in Ketchikan who was lucky enough to have gov't housing (which has its good and bad sides). I knew another agent who had to actually live in a campground when he first moved to Sitka because his temporary quarters allowance (gov-speak for government-funded hotel accomodations) ran out before he could find a home suitable for he and his family. "Suitable" has a different definition in Alaska than many may have down here in the lower-48. Alaska is a great place to see and experience. And it's often a good place to get a foot in the door. Just know what you're getting yourself into - you AND your wife:

              Alaska is love or hate. I loved it, my wife hated it, she won.
              +1. My wife hated it, too, which is why I'm back down here.
              "Sir, does this mean that Ann Margaret's not coming?"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by GreenLine View Post
                I know and work with several USFS 1811's and LEO's, but I also happen to know a USFS LEO who was once stationed in Sitka.

                Remember that virtually all of SE Alaska is part of the Tongass National Forest. Well, it's all either NF land or glacier (glaciers are what keep SE Alaska isolated/cut off from automobile traffic). He worked a lot of sport fishing, hunting (especially bears), and essentially all of the other stuff that UFSF LEOs work: drugs and crimes within the NF. Some things pretty cool; some things probably not as fun - like any federal agency.

                As for the ferry.... At either duty station you will essentially be traveling on an EXTREMELY limited auto route. The city I lived in had 27 miles of roads. Sitka and Ketchikan are both smaller. So if it's a gov't-paid move (which I assume it is), you'll get on the ferry in Bellingham, WA with your car, spend a couple of days getting to either, then drive around in circles for X years... OK, it's not THAT bad, but the cabin fever can make it seem that way sometimes. Google the Alaska Marine Highway for details on the ferry. Housing is also very limited. I knew an agent in Ketchikan who was lucky enough to have gov't housing (which has its good and bad sides). I knew another agent who had to actually live in a campground when he first moved to Sitka because his temporary quarters allowance (gov-speak for government-funded hotel accomodations) ran out before he could find a home suitable for he and his family. "Suitable" has a different definition in Alaska than many may have down here in the lower-48. Alaska is a great place to see and experience. And it's often a good place to get a foot in the door. Just know what you're getting yourself into - you AND your wife:



                +1. My wife hated it, too, which is why I'm back down here.
                I’ve checked out all the info about the two ranger districts and they are pretty big and also remote like you said. I love to hunt and fish which is one reason why I want to go into natural resource law enforcement, so I would have no problem working hunting and fishing enforcement. I also know that the USFS in Alaska is the manager for subsistence hunting, fishing, and shell fishing and that the LEO’s patrol it so that makes me even more excited about the job. I know they do a lot of patrolling by boat, plane and ATV so that doesn’t really bother me.

                I interned for NOAA/NMFS OLE while in college so I do have a little bit of knowledge on the fisheries laws and also doing boat patrols since I did quite a few of them with NOAA so maybe that will help me out. As I am sure you know GreenLine, if you have no experience and are applying to work for NOAA your best shot at getting a job is AK, I was just wondering if it’s the same with USFS. Like I said before I’m a young single guy so I don’t really have anything holding me back from living there, such as a wife or kids. Quite honestly working/living in AK for a couple years sounds very exciting to me.

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                • #9
                  A 26 year old chick was hired for the LEO position in Ketchikan, AK.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bigfish View Post
                    A 26 year old chick was hired for the LEO position in Ketchikan, AK.
                    I'm sensing a little animosity.....

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wildlife97 View Post
                      I’ve checked out all the info about the two ranger districts and they are pretty big and also remote like you said. I love to hunt and fish which is one reason why I want to go into natural resource law enforcement, so I would have no problem working hunting and fishing enforcement. I also know that the USFS in Alaska is the manager for subsistence hunting, fishing, and shell fishing and that the LEO’s patrol it so that makes me even more excited about the job. I know they do a lot of patrolling by boat, plane and ATV so that doesn’t really bother me.

                      I interned for NOAA/NMFS OLE while in college so I do have a little bit of knowledge on the fisheries laws and also doing boat patrols since I did quite a few of them with NOAA so maybe that will help me out. As I am sure you know GreenLine, if you have no experience and are applying to work for NOAA your best shot at getting a job is AK, I was just wondering if it’s the same with USFS. Like I said before I’m a young single guy so I don’t really have anything holding me back from living there, such as a wife or kids. Quite honestly working/living in AK for a couple years sounds very exciting to me.
                      Why is Alaska the least desirable place to work as a NOAA Enforcement Officer?

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                      • #12
                        It's alive!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by astolfo83 View Post
                          It's alive!
                          👍

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