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  • #46
    More career progression questions

    FormerNOPD,

    Thank you for your reply. I have a few followup questions so please excuse my ignorance as I am new to the whole concept of federal jobs as a whole. In regards to CBP officer, I found the following...

    "What are the career advancement opportunities? In a few years when you reach the GS-11 CBP Officer level, you will be eligible to apply for special assignments. These include assignments on Enforcement and Special Response Teams, Firearms, Training, Container Security Initiative (CSI) International assignments, Targeting and Analysis Teams, and Canine Teams working with agency-certified detector dogs."

    So if it did take 3 years for a new person to reach the GS-11 level, what can he or she expect afterwards. Do the special assignments listed above include any raises? I'm trying to get a feeling of what I could expect from CBP if I pursue the officer position as a career. Is GS-11 the last level and do most CBP officers retire at this level?

    Basicaly, any info that you or anyone else can provide me to help paint a better picture of what to hope for or expect from being with CBP as an officer for 20 years or more, would be appreciated.

    Thank you.

    Comment


    • #47
      FormerNOPD,

      Thank you for your reply. I have a few followup questions so please excuse my ignorance as I am new to the whole concept of federal jobs as a whole. In regards to CBP officer, I found the following...

      "What are the career advancement opportunities? In a few years when you reach the GS-11 CBP Officer level, you will be eligible to apply for special assignments. These include assignments on Enforcement and Special Response Teams, Firearms, Training, Container Security Initiative (CSI) International assignments, Targeting and Analysis Teams, and Canine Teams working with agency-certified detector dogs." All of these positions are either TDY positions or PCS positions (CSI) and are collateral duties that generally do not connote promotion or raise in pay. The overseas duty will pay more with COLAs and such, but it will generally not be a raise. You can put in for these duties once you reach GS11, but it does not mean you'll get them.

      So if it did take 3 years for a new person to reach the GS-11 level, what can he or she expect afterwards. The same thing as the first three years. Not much new, but you have the option to apply for other openings.


      Do the special assignments listed above include any raises?Assignments, no. Promotions, yes. They can be one in the same depending on the announcement. For instance, if you apply for a CSI position in france, and it's a GS 12 position and they choose you, then it would be a promotion. If it's a GS11 slot, then it's just another duty assignment.

      I'm trying to get a feeling of what I could expect from CBP if I pursue the officer position as a career. Is GS-11 the last level and do most CBP officers retire at this level? GS11 is journeylevel, and it's non competitive up to that level. Beyond that, you have to test/compete for the supervisor positions and above (sup is gs12. Chief officer is GS13. Asst port director and port director are GS14/15.)

      Basicaly, any info that you or anyone else can provide me to help paint a better picture of what to hope for or expect from being with CBP as an officer for 20 years or more, would be appreciated. Our retirement sucks. It's one percent per year. We do have the TSP, which is a money market retirement account, and they'll match the first 5% dollar for dollar.

      Thank you.

      Comment


      • #48
        Supervisory CBP Officer

        Do supervisor CBP Officers and all higher levels get LEO status? Are they eligible for the 20 year retirement system?

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by leoiaf
          Do supervisor CBP Officers and all higher levels get LEO status? Are they eligible for the 20 year retirement system?
          NO they are'nt. CBP has FERS for retirement system. There is a push in congress to change that though to the 20 6(c) covered position. We'll see.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by leoiaf
            Do supervisor CBP Officers and all higher levels get LEO status? Are they eligible for the 20 year retirement system?

            Although i'm not a CBP Officer, a good friend of mine is. He is a GS-13 (supervisor) and does not receive LE retirement (aka '6c'). The only folks in CBP who receive 6c LE retirement are BP Agents, Air/Marine Agents, and CBP Enforcement Officers. The rest get the standard 1% per year federal government retirement. However just because they do not receive LE retirement, it does not mean they are not LE. CBP Officers are granted 24 hour carry...

            Comment


            • #51
              No

              Originally posted by leoiaf
              Do supervisor CBP Officers and all higher levels get LEO status? Are they eligible for the 20 year retirement system?
              CBP officers GS-1895 (Customs/Immigration) regardless of rank are not considered law enforcement and are not entitled to a 20 year full retirement.

              Comment


              • #52
                More inquires

                The reason I ask is because of a confusing paragraph I read in this article...

                http://www.afge.org/index.cfm?page=c...&contentid=190

                It says "Today, many but not all federal police officers are covered under this definition, including the Capitol Police, FBI, Park Police, Secret Service Officers, and supervisory CBP Officers, but not CBP Officers themselves." Thats why I was wondering.

                I have a few followup questions as I'm trying to somewhat plan my future.

                I have a B.S. degree and have been offered the conditional letter of employment a few weeks ago. Today I got fingerprinted and I tried asking about the compressed schedule benefit I found on the OPM website. However it seemed by the general responses that a CBP Officer would not get it. I was hoping it would not be a huge issue to get because I have recently been selected by the ANG to attend pilot training at a much later date. After training my obligations would be to fly once a week, a weekend a month, and 2 weeks a year. Obviously a compressed time schedule such as working 4 days a week would be very accomodating. However their responses were "you'll get your 2 weeks military leave but the rest is on you." Is their any chance of trying to negotiate a compressed time schedule if and when the time comes?

                Also, how does one get to be a CBP enforcement officer or where can I find out info on getting hired as an Air Agent?

                Thanks for any help or suggestions and past replies.

                Comment


                • #53
                  In regards to military duty, being employed by the federal government, and flying in the Guard; your usual weekly sorties will be on AFTP status which authorizes you to take a day of either paid or un paid military leave from the federal government. Check out the ESGR wen site. While true; you do have your 15 days, that is only in referance to paid days.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    The reason I ask is because of a confusing paragraph I read in this article...

                    http://www.afge.org/index.cfm?page=c...&contentid=190

                    It says "Today, many but not all federal police officers are covered under this definition, including the Capitol Police, FBI, Park Police, Secret Service Officers, and supervisory CBP Officers, but not CBP Officers themselves." Thats why I was wondering. There are some training positions and special positions that have been listed in the last 6 months as a covered position, but they are political - very high positions, something you'll likely not see, not for at least 20 years.

                    I have a few followup questions as I'm trying to somewhat plan my future.

                    I have a B.S. degree and have been offered the conditional letter of employment a few weeks ago. Today I got fingerprinted and I tried asking about the compressed schedule benefit I found on the OPM website. However it seemed by the general responses that a CBP Officer would not get it. I was hoping it would not be a huge issue to get because I have recently been selected by the ANG to attend pilot training at a much later date. After training my obligations would be to fly once a week, a weekend a month, and 2 weeks a year. Obviously a compressed time schedule such as working 4 days a week would be very accomodating. However their responses were "you'll get your 2 weeks military leave but the rest is on you." Is their any chance of trying to negotiate a compressed time schedule if and when the time comes? NO, you will not get a compressed schedule. It's not possible with CBP. You'll have to burn military leave or annual leave.

                    Also, how does one get to be a CBP enforcement officer or where can I find out info on getting hired as an Air Agent? Air and Marine agents are 1801s and are covered. You'll have to do a search on usajobs and hope for an opening. I applied in 2002 for a marine position and was in the running for 2 years until they were cancelled. They have not hired anyone for those positions since 2002. Enforcement officer? You will never get into that position - they are leftover seinior INS inspectors that were covered. They keep hinting that they're going to bring it back, but in reality, this agency was a hostile takeover by the customs side of the house, and they've pretty much screwed everything up that they possibly can.

                    Thanks for any help or suggestions and past replies.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Here is one for you formernopd

                      Did you know that before we all became 1895 canine enforcement officers were classified 1801? (not 1890 like the inspectors were) They were enforcement officers just like air & marine enforcement officers GS-1801. They had no duties that did not meet OPMs classification for law enforcement. Back around 1993 OPM had decided to reclassify them as law enforcement along with the land border inspectors. But the union said no. Either we all get it or no one gets it. So no one got it. Canine got screwed because it had layed in bed with the inspectors. Why should the union look out for a couple hundred CEOs when there are so many more inspectors to worry about? And the average inspector has always believed himself to be superior to the dog handlers. If the union would have agreeded back then, it would have been much easier for the airport and seaport inspectors to get it at a later date. As a result we all got screwed.
                      Have you ever asked yourself why canine officers primarily only work with inspectors? They should have remained separate from the inspectors and worked with who needed them. Inspectors, Agents, Air and Marine officers. Like everything else it came down to money. In the begining CEOs had a lower journeyman level and the inspectors saw that the CEOs had a nice budget that they can get their hands on. So the inspectors helped the CEOs get a higher journeyman level and the rest is history.
                      Last edited by 1895bombdog; 09-09-2006, 10:31 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by 1895bombdog
                        Did you know that before we all became 1895 canine enforcement officers were classified 1801? (not 1890 like the inspectors were) They were enforcement officers just like air & marine enforcement officers GS-1801. They had no duties that did not meet OPMs classification for law enforcement. Back around 1993 OPM had decided to reclassify them as law enforcement along with the land border inspectors. But the union said no. Either we all get it or no one gets it. So no one got it. Canine got screwed because it had layed in bed with the inspectors. Why should the union look out for a couple hundred CEOs when there are so many more inspectors to worry about? And the average inspector has always believed himself to be superior to the dog handlers. If the union would have agreeded back then, it would have been much easier for the airport and seaport inspectors to get it at a later date. As a result we all got screwed.
                        Have you ever asked yourself why canine officers primarily only work with inspectors? They should have remained separate from the inspectors and worked with who needed them. Inspectors, Agents, Air and Marine officers. Like everything else it came down to money. In the begining CEOs had a lower journeyman level and the inspectors saw that the CEOs had a nice budget that they can get their hands on. So the inspectors helped the CEOs get a higher journeyman level and the rest is history.
                        Yes, I was aware of that, really pathetic as far as I'm concerned. The union does more damage than help. I've been working with my congressman to help make 6c a reality for us all. It'd be easier to just through my hands up and walk away, but that would just feed the fire of status quo mediocrace... No, I'll stay put until I can effect change. All good officers should stay put and not let the union or bad management brow beat them into submission...

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          CBP Military Leave

                          Can anyone translate this in simple english or use any examples:

                          "Employees who request military leave for inactive duty training (which generally is 2, 4, or 6 hours in length) will now be charged only the amount of military leave necessary to cover the period of training and necessary travel. Members of the Reserves or and National Guard will no longer be charged military leave for weekends and holidays that occur within the period of military service."

                          I picked it up from:

                          http://www.opm.gov/oca/leave/html/MILITARY.ASP

                          By any chance does this mean I would not be charged from the 15 annual military leave days for a weekend drill?

                          Thank you.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by leoiaf
                            Can anyone translate this in simple english or use any examples:

                            "Employees who request military leave for inactive duty training (which generally is 2, 4, or 6 hours in length) will now be charged only the amount of military leave necessary to cover the period of training and necessary travel. Members of the Reserves or and National Guard will no longer be charged military leave for weekends and holidays that occur within the period of military service."

                            I picked it up from:

                            http://www.opm.gov/oca/leave/html/MILITARY.ASP

                            By any chance does this mean I would not be charged from the 15 annual military leave days for a weekend drill?

                            Thank you.

                            If the drill is on your regular day off, then no, they won't charge you. If it is on your regular work day, you have to have military leave or annual leave.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by formerNOPD
                              The reason I ask is because of a confusing paragraph I read in this article...

                              http://www.afge.org/index.cfm?page=c...&contentid=190

                              It says "Today, many but not all federal police officers are covered under this definition, including the Capitol Police, FBI, Park Police, Secret Service Officers, and supervisory CBP Officers, but not CBP Officers themselves." Thats why I was wondering. There are some training positions and special positions that have been listed in the last 6 months as a covered position, but they are political - very high positions, something you'll likely not see, not for at least 20 years.

                              I have a few followup questions as I'm trying to somewhat plan my future.

                              I have a B.S. degree and have been offered the conditional letter of employment a few weeks ago. Today I got fingerprinted and I tried asking about the compressed schedule benefit I found on the OPM website. However it seemed by the general responses that a CBP Officer would not get it. I was hoping it would not be a huge issue to get because I have recently been selected by the ANG to attend pilot training at a much later date. After training my obligations would be to fly once a week, a weekend a month, and 2 weeks a year. Obviously a compressed time schedule such as working 4 days a week would be very accomodating. However their responses were "you'll get your 2 weeks military leave but the rest is on you." Is their any chance of trying to negotiate a compressed time schedule if and when the time comes? NO, you will not get a compressed schedule. It's not possible with CBP. You'll have to burn military leave or annual leave.

                              Also, how does one get to be a CBP enforcement officer or where can I find out info on getting hired as an Air Agent? Air and Marine agents are 1801s and are covered. You'll have to do a search on usajobs and hope for an opening. I applied in 2002 for a marine position and was in the running for 2 years until they were cancelled. They have not hired anyone for those positions since 2002. Enforcement officer? You will never get into that position - they are leftover seinior INS inspectors that were covered. They keep hinting that they're going to bring it back, but in reality, this agency was a hostile takeover by the customs side of the house, and they've pretty much screwed everything up that they possibly can.

                              Thanks for any help or suggestions and past replies.
                              at some ports they have hired new enforcement officers and they were never SRI's

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                formernopd is correct

                                Originally posted by What?
                                at some ports they have hired new enforcement officers and they were never SRI's
                                The first thing you need to learn if you are considering a career with our government is never apply any common sense. If you do you will be wrong and very unhappy or disatisfied.

                                Comment

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