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  • #16
    Originally posted by MidnightHeat
    If you are under 37, and looking to get into Federal Law Enforcement, I would say don't even waste your time with CBP. You will have to go to a four month academy in FLETC and learn everything there is to know about being a real LEO only to go back to your port and be a stamp monkey in a booth. CBP are not LEO's they are inspectors. Looking like a cop and being a cop are two very different things.

    That's a bit harsh, don't you think?

    Airport officers might well end up in a booth as stamp monkeys, but those working on a land border(especially at southern border POE) probably won't.

    I personally haven't stamped an I-94/94W in more than a year.

    Comment


    • #17
      FWIW, there's almost no OT available around here.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by merlin436
        That's a bit harsh, don't you think?

        Airport officers might well end up in a booth as stamp monkeys, but those working on a land border(especially at southern border POE) probably won't.

        I personally haven't stamped an I-94/94W in more than a year.
        I have friends that work at the landborder, and they tell me that it is the same as working in the airport, except you are outdoors and you deal with vehicles instead of people comigng off a plane. They all hate it and have applications pending with other agencies.

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        • #19
          1895 Bombdog.

          "Please do tell what happens on the southern border with all that overtime? Have you ever been forced out? Have you ever been forced to spend another 8 hours because someone called in sick? Do you know of anyone who was forced to call in sick just to spend a birthday or special event with a family member? How is the morale at your port?"

          24/7 Non stop traffic and ped lines, processing drug loads, bodies in trunks etc, imposters, DUI's, drunks, fights, wanted persons. Not sure what you mean by forced out. I am guessing that you mean that you are predrafted. In other words told that you are being told that you have to come in before your shift to work OT. We call it Predrafted. Happens everyday. Having been drafted to cover for someone who called in sick, happens many times every day. People calling in sick, just to have some time away from work, that is seen as normal here. As far as morale. My opinion if you like action and alot of OT. Very high. If you do not like OT, very low. Just my honest opinion from So Cal.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CBPSDJohn
            1895 Bombdog.

            "Please do tell what happens on the southern border with all that overtime? Have you ever been forced out? Have you ever been forced to spend another 8 hours because someone called in sick? Do you know of anyone who was forced to call in sick just to spend a birthday or special event with a family member? How is the morale at your port?"

            24/7 Non stop traffic and ped lines, processing drug loads, bodies in trunks etc, imposters, DUI's, drunks, fights, wanted persons. Not sure what you mean by forced out. I am guessing that you mean that you are predrafted. In other words told that you are being told that you have to come in before your shift to work OT. We call it Predrafted. Happens everyday. Having been drafted to cover for someone who called in sick, happens many times every day. People calling in sick, just to have some time away from work, that is seen as normal here. As far as morale. My opinion if you like action and alot of OT. Very high. If you do not like OT, very low. Just my honest opinion from So Cal.

            I'd have to agree. This job is what you make of it. It has BS just like any other job, but I tell you it's like retirement compared to NOPD....

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            • #21
              Thank you

              I started at a land border location. Did 5 years and the best part of it was when I saw it in my rear view mirror as I left. While everything you said is true I remember things differently. I remember a port that could care less of the DUIs. In fact many people made their declarations with a beer between their legs as they drove through. Kids (teenagers) returning to the US drunk, (getting sick/falling down). No one cared! The thing I remember the most about the fights were the officers who ran away and did not want to help or get involved. Not all but enough to make me realize I could not count on everyone for help if needed. Something I never experienced as a cop. I also remember an AUSA who refused to file charges for inspectors who were assaulted by the public. I remember a port that made no attempt to stop or deter port runners and actually wrote up an inspector who chased down a pedestrian who was loaded and ran when questioned. All you could do is waive at them as they forced their way through and nearly ran over anyone in their way. At my port you couldn't sit down or even lean against the tables and after 3 or 4 16 hour days that got old. People actually pretended to go to the rest room just to sit down for a while. It's definitely blood money. I saw poor housing and living conditions. Saw many families break up or devorce due to work or the living conditions. I quickly learned about the port politics and the Customs way of doing things (the good old boy) and that hard work, personal sacrifice and loyalty meant nothing and I had no trouble moving on.
              Oh and for the record I put more than my share of seizures on the table.
              Last edited by 1895bombdog; 07-10-2006, 10:19 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by MidnightHeat
                I have friends that work at the landborder, and they tell me that it is the same as working in the airport, except you are outdoors and you deal with vehicles instead of people comigng off a plane. They all hate it and have applications pending with other agencies.
                I wonder... how much are your friends motivations for leaving CBP driven by the desire to have 6C and all it's perks and how much is driven by their hatred of the CBPO job?

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                • #23
                  It's both. One of the guys I went to the academy with is stationed at San Ysidro and he tells me that he is confined to a checkpoint all day long and the cars never stop coming. He has to beg just to take a pee break.

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                  • #24
                    Anyone out there hear any new intel? Any top of the listers hear anything?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Just wanted to ask if anybody out there has worked in the lax or La port area as a CBP officer since that was one of my Geo picks along with Ia. How is the OT working conditions and such? Id love to work there since i have family in the Palmdale,Lancaster area. Yea i know the commute will suck.

                      Gabe
                      "So others may live"

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        http://www.govexec.com/dailyfed/0706/071406r1.htm

                        Senators take new stab at redefining law officer jobs
                        By Karen Rutzick
                        krutzick@govexec.com

                        Two Maryland Democrats introduced a Senate bill on Thursday to grant more federal employees an early retirement option by expanding the definition of federal law enforcement officer.


                        Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Paul Sarbanes offered a companion version of the House's bill (H.R. 1002), which would provide Customs and Border Protection officers, police officers at the Veterans Affairs Department and other employees not defined as law enforcement officers the ability to retire at age 50 with 20 years of service. Standard federal employees are not eligible until they have 30 years or more of service and are at least are 55 years old.


                        Federal law enforcement officers receive a higher annuity upon retirement. An officer retiring at age 50 with 20 years of service and a $65,000 salary would receive $22,000 more annually in retirement benefits than a standard federal employee retiring under the Federal Employee Retirement System, according to the American Federation of Government Employees.


                        "We need to make sure that all federal law enforcement officers earn the pay and benefits that they deserve," Mikulski said. "These brave men and women...have the same law enforcement training as all other law enforcement personnel and face the same risks and challenges."


                        Federal labor unions have been lobbying Congress for a decade to grant CBP officers and others law enforcement status. In November, a group of Republican House lawmakers released a concept paper aimed at providing pay equity for federal law enforcement officers.


                        Despite optimism before its release, the unions ultimately opposed the proposal because it would grant the Office of Personnel Management too much discretion in defining law enforcement positions, they said.


                        Instead they have focused on H.R. 1002, and now its companion Senate bill, to bring parity.


                        "Our increased national awareness of and emphasis on port security and related matters is helping to focus on the clear law enforcement nature of the work of CBP officers," said Colleen Kelley, president of the National Treasury Employees Union. "The continual denial of LEO status is harming the ability of the federal government to recruit and retain the dedicated employees we need."


                        NTEU recently won a union election for representation of all CBP employees over AFGE, which is contesting the results, charging that CBP management skewed the election toward NTEU.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Has anyone heard anything yet? I scored a 100 w/o vet. preference on the test but I have yet to get anything else in the mail or receive a phone call. I hope this doesn't take a year... I figured that with the whole "secure our ports" push, they'd expedite this process a little. I guess the Israel/Lebanon fight has given them more time, now that the focus of the news stations has shifted.
                          ICE 1811
                          Test: 7/09
                          TO: 5/24
                          T&S: 6/17
                          EOD: 8/16

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            95 with vet pref here and haven't heard a thing...probably will come all at once very soon. I hate waiting...

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Everyone is still waiting. I know 4 that took the test - 109, 107, 98 and 87 all with vets pref that have not heard a word. I know that the govt recently passed a new incentive for vets to be hired, but I don't know if they're going to go down that list first or go by scores only.
                              Just keep your chin up and keep on waiting. It's not an instant process, which is why you should never count on something - always have a fallback plan, no telling how long it could take, after all, it's the govt...

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                House homeland security committee voted on 6c coverage for CBPOs on July 12th, it passed! We're getting very close!


                                The House Homeland Security Committee yesterday voted to provide law
                                enforcement officer (LEO) status to Customs and Border Protection
                                Officers (CBPOs) from the March 2003 creation of CBP. NTEU supports LEO
                                status for all CBPOs including all legacy Customs and Immigration
                                inspectors and is fighting for complete coverage in any final
                                legislation.
                                The action by Homeland Security is only one step in the road to passage
                                of LEO legislation but it is a positive step. NTEU will fight for
                                legislation that would bring LEO status to all CBPOs as laid out in
                                H.R. 1002 and S. 3652.
                                While many members of the Homeland Security Committee support
                                retroactive LEO coverage that would allow legacy Customs and INS
                                inspector service to be counted toward a 20-year retirement benefit,
                                jurisdictional issues have been raised that prevent the committee from
                                taking action that is retroactive to before the creation of the
                                department or the Homeland Security Committee. Other congressional
                                committees, including the House Government Reform Committee and Senate
                                Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, would not be
                                bound by these same limitations and NTEU will be working with those
                                committees to ensure that any legislation providing LEO coverage for
                                CBPOs will be available retroactively to legacy Customs and INS
                                inspectors.
                                ôFinally, members of Congress are beginning to recognize the critical
                                role CBP Officers play in our nationÆs security,ö said NTEU President
                                Colleen M. Kelley. ôEvery time we gain additional support we are one
                                step closer to 20-year retirement for all of these deserving front-line
                                employees.ö
                                In other action by the Homeland Security Committee on the DHS
                                Reauthorization bill, NTEU-supported amendments were rejected that
                                would have ended the MaxHR personnel system and provided a journey
                                grade 12 for CBPOs.

                                Comment

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