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  • Does anyone know the typical hours for Atlanta-Hartsfield Jackson airport? I heard its 2 weeks of 1pm-10pm followed by 1 week of 5am-2pm, but I was hoping that was not the case..lol

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    • For anyone currently at FLETC or in the know, are there many
      "over 37 years old" guys/gals coming into training? And if so, what are they saying about their "retirement" arrangement? I am 42, waiting BI to clear, & am receiving different answers to my inquiries.

      Any feedback for us "older" applicants caught in the transition would be
      helpful.

      Comment


      • isn't the cut off for CBP 37?

        Comment


        • From what I understand, if you applied before the age requirement
          then you had to be referred by 07/01/08. I THINK! I applied 1 1/2 years ago.

          Comment


          • Well day two of EOD has been completed. Not a whole lot to say about it. I have just been doing computer based training and taking tours of the airport. I haven't met too many ot the other officers because they pretty much put us newbies in the computer lab and leave us alone alllllll day long. I did meet the dog today though, that was fun. The person that I had to report to and do my paper work with went over all the benefits and everything that I needed to know. She told me that I fall under the mandatory retirement rules. Now I was under the impression that if I got my TO prior to July 6th then I fall under the old rules? Can anyone clarify?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by ammo19 View Post
              Well day two of EOD has been completed. Not a whole lot to say about it. I have just been doing computer based training and taking tours of the airport. I haven't met too many ot the other officers because they pretty much put us newbies in the computer lab and leave us alone alllllll day long. I did meet the dog today though, that was fun. The person that I had to report to and do my paper work with went over all the benefits and everything that I needed to know. She told me that I fall under the mandatory retirement rules. Now I was under the impression that if I got my TO prior to July 6th then I fall under the old rules? Can anyone clarify?
              When you got your TO doesn't matter. They're going by your EOD.
              Don't tase me bro!!

              Comment


              • Saw this over on Delphi, figured it was worth the cross post. Take a look at the comments on the URL for this article. Talk about a hatefest. People need to get a clue.

                At JFK Airport, Denying Basic Rights Is Just Another Day at the Office
                By Emily Feder, AlterNet
                Posted on August 18, 2008, Printed on August 19, 2008
                http://www.alternet.org/story/95351/
                I arrived at JFK Airport two weeks ago after a short vacation to Syria and presented my American passport for re-entry to the United States. After 28 hours of traveling, I had settled into a hazy awareness that this was the last, most familiar leg of a long journey. I exchanged friendly words with the Homeland Security official who was recording my name in his computer. He scrolled through my passport, and when his thumb rested on my Syrian visa, he paused. Jerking toward the door of his glass-enclosed booth, he slid my passport into a dingy green plastic folder and walked down the hallway, motioning for me to follow with a flick of his wrist. Where was he taking me, I asked him. "You'll find out," he said.

                We got to an enclosed holding area in the arrivals section of the airport. He shoved the folder into my hand and gestured toward four sets of Homeland Security guards sitting at large desks. Attached to each desk were metal poles capped with red, white and blue siren lights. I approached two guards carrying weapons and wearing uniforms similar to New York City police officers, but they shook their heads, laughed and said, "Over there," pointing in the direction of four overflowing holding pens. I approached different desks until I found an official who nodded and shoved my green folder in a crowded metal file holder. When I asked him why I was there, he glared at me, took a sip from his water bottle, bit into a sandwich, and began to dig between his molars with his forefinger. I found a seat next to a man who looked about my age -- in his late 20s -- and waited.

                Omar (not his real name) finished his fifth year in biomedical engineering at City College in June. He had just arrived from Beirut, where he visited his family and was waiting to go home to the apartment he shared with his brother in Harlem. Despite his near-perfect English and designer jeans, Omar looked scared. He rubbed his hands and rocked softly in his seat. He had been waiting for hours already, and, as he pointed out, a number of people -- some sick, elderly, pregnant or holding sobbing babies -- had too. There were approximately 70 people detained in our cordoned-off section: All were Arab (with the exception of me and the friend I traveled with), and almost all had arrived from Dubai, Amman or Damascus. Many were U.S. citizens.

                We were in the front row, sitting a few feet from two guards' desks. They sneered at each bewildered arrival, told jokes in whispers, swiveled in their office chairs and greeted passing guards who stopped to talk -- guards who had a habit of looping their fingers into their holsters. One asked his friend how many nationalities were represented in the room. "About 20. Some of everything today."

                No one who had been detained knew precisely why they were there. A few people were led into private rooms; others were questioned out in the open at desks a few feet from the crowd and then allowed to pass through customs. Some were sent to another section of the holding area with large computer screens and cameras, and then brought back. The uninformed consensus among the detainees was that some people would be fingerprinted, have their irises scanned and be sent back to the countries from which they had disembarked, regardless of citizenship status; others would be fingerprinted and allowed to stay; and the unlucky ones would be detained indefinitely and moved to a more permanent facility.

                There was one British tourist in the group. Paul (also not his real name) was traveling with three friends who had passed through customs soon after their plane landed and were waiting for him on the other side of the metal barrier; he suspected he had been detained because of his dark skin. When he asked if he could go to the bathroom, one of the guards said, "I wouldn't." "What if someone has to?" I asked. "They will just have to hold it," the guard responded with a smile. Paul began to cry. I watched as he, over the course of four hours, went from feeling exuberant about his trip to New York to despising the entire country. "I speak the Queen's English," he said to me. "I'm third-generation British. I came to America because I've always wanted to come here, and now they've got me so scared that all I want to do is go home. We're paying for your stupid war anyway."


                To be powerless and mocked at the same time makes one feel ashamed, which leads quickly to rage. Within a few hours of my arrival, I saw at least 10 people denied the right to use the bathroom or buy food and water. I watched my traveling companion duck under a barrier, run to the bathroom and slip back into the holding section -- which, of course, someone of another ethnicity in a state of panic would be very reluctant to do. The United States is good at naming enemies, but apparently we are even better at making them, especially of individuals. I don't know if it's worse for national security -- and more embarrassing for Americans -- that this is the first experience tourists have of our country, or that some U.S. citizens get treated this way upon entering their own country.

                The guard who had been picking his molars for hours quietly mispronounced the names of people whose turn it was to be questioned, muttering each surname three times and then moving on. When he called Omar from City College to his desk, I moved closer to hear the interview. "Where did you go?" the officer asked. "What is your address in the United States? Is your brother here illegally? Do you support Hezbollah? What do you think of Hezbollah in general? How do you pay for your life here? How many people live with you? Are you sure it's just you and your brother? Who are your friends?" Omar answered respectfully and emphatically; he was then asked to wait by the side of the desk, from which he was ushered toward one of the rooms.

                After four hours, I finally demanded to speak to the guards' supervisor, and he was called down. I asked if the detainees could file a formal complaint. He said there were complaint forms (which, in English and Spanish, direct one to the Department of Homeland Security's Web site, where one must enter extensive personal information in order to file a "Trip Summary") but initially refused to hand them out or to give me his telephone number. "The Department of Homeland Security is understaffed, underfunded, and I have men here who are doing 14-hour days." He tried to intimidate me when I wrote down his name -- "So, you're writing down our names. Well, we have more on you" -- and asked me questions about my address and my profession in front of the rest of the people detained. I pointed out a few of the families who had missed their flights and had been waiting seven hours. His voice barely controlled, his lip curled into a smirk, he explained slowly, condescendingly, that they need only go to the ticket counter at Jet Blue and reschedule so they could fly out in an hour. One mother responded with what he must have already known: Jet Blue goes to most destinations only once or twice a day and her whole family would have to sleep in the airport.

                A large crowd began to gather. Everyone wanted to voice complaints. I explained to the supervisor that his guards had been making people afraid. He flipped through the green files, tossing the American passports to the front of the pile. "You should have gone first, before these people. American citizens first -- that's how it should be." In the face of dozens of requests and questions, he turned and left.

                The guards processed me then, ignoring the order of arrivals, if there ever had been one. They refused to distribute more complaint forms or call the supervisor back down at the request of Arab families. One officer threatened, "I'm talking politely to you now. If you don't sit down, I won't be talking politely to you anymore." One announced that because "the American girl" had gotten angry, the families would have to wait a few more hours. "The supervisor is not coming back."

                I reassured my Homeland Security interrogator that I did not make any connections with Hezbollah or with anyone I knew to be associated with such an organization. I am not a member of any terrorist group. In fact, my visit to Syria had been so apolitical and touristy that I felt an embarrassing affinity with the pastel-shirted families waiting by the Air France baggage carousels in the distance, whom I knew I would eventually join.

                As I walked out of the enclosure, some people thanked me, squeezing my arm and putting their hands on my shoulders. It was shocking that briefly standing up to someone overseeing an abuse of civil rights -- in JFK airport, in the United States, where we supposedly have laws and a democratic judicial system -- could be perceived as heroic. I had nothing to lose, but the other people being detained had everything to lose.

                In the past five years I have worked for human rights and refugee advocacy organizations in Serbia, Russia and Croatia, including the International Rescue Committee and USAID. I have traveled to many different places, some supposedly repressive, and have never seen people treated with the kind of animosity that Homeland Security showed that night. In Syria, border control officers were stern but polite. At other borders there have been bureaucracies to contend with -- excruciating for both Americans and other foreign nationals. I've met Russian officials with dead, suspicious looks in their eyes and arms tired from stamping so many visas, but in America, the Homeland Security officials I encountered were very much alive -- like vultures waiting to eat.


                © 2008 Independent Media Institute. All rights reserved.
                View this story online at: http://www.alternet.org/story/95351/

                Comment


                • Sounds like an activist with an agenda to me. The majority of people are not referred to secondary. The ones that are there are for a reason. Its amazing how people act towards US Customs and Immigration officials. If you pop off smart to officials in other countries you would have a serious problem. For some reason people don't think that applies here. People think its ok for us to do our jobs until it effects them. I don't know the culture at JFK but I doubt it went down as this activist stated. Many people returning from Syria or other designated terrorist countries are subjected to a little more scrutiny but there are usually other factors that get them to secondary not just where they are coming from. Sounds to me like this guy just wanted to put his resume on the internet for all to see.
                  Last edited by qixfeet; 08-20-2008, 10:06 AM. Reason: Ranting
                  Don't tase me bro!!

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by deyosurf19 View Post
                    Hi Guys,

                    Few questions for those in the know:

                    1) When people say they get bounced from the academy for medical is it just because of injury. Why else do they medically bounce you? Do they do a more extensive physical when you are there?
                    People who fail for medical reasons include those who have heart attacks, strokes, and other medical emergencies. They also include those with previously know 'injuries' like diabetes and such who find they can't keep up with the program. I suppose that it's possible to get the original clearance for a pre-existing injury ( like broken back or such) and then be removed from the program later on, but it would be rare.


                    Most people who out medically leave on the basis of injuries occured at FLETC.


                    2)If you get bounced from the academy are you automatically jobless? Can you file for unemployment?

                    People who leave on the basis of injury are often allowed to recycle and sometimes penciled in to do 'soft-duty' jobs at their port, those who leave for academics or firearms are seldom allowed to recycle.

                    2)Uniform: Are you allowed to wear your uniform home after work, or when you pop in to grab your Starbucks after work. etc.? Or are you supposed to take it off at your POE.

                    You can wear your uniform to and from work. This of course leads to officer safety issues. Often it's best not to wear it to and fro or to wear a cover shirt while driving. As far as stopping off to grab a coffee or a Pepsi at Starsucks or the local 'stop and rob' for gas, a Dew and a doughnut, that's not usually a problem...but it may not be all that great of an idea.(officer safety wise)

                    Going in uniform to buy beer(it happens), family grocery shopping at Target, getting that wide-screen TV at Best Buys, etc. is a bad idea and will probably bring you grief. Anything that you do while in uniform that you think might bring you grief most probably will.

                    Think of it this way, anything you do with you uniform on creates a nexus between your actions at the time and your job. Management will be more than happy to view your off-duty use of the uniform in the most negative light. Use common sense and cover shirts and you probably won't have issues.
                    Last edited by merlin436; 08-20-2008, 12:27 PM.

                    Comment


                    • Does anyone know if CBP is going to open anymore vacancy announcements? Usually, how long after an announcement expires does the agency list another announcement? I know it depends on staffing, but what is the trend if they don't fulfill their quota. thanks

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by johndeere455 View Post
                        Does anyone know if CBP is going to open anymore vacancy announcements? Usually, how long after an announcement expires does the agency list another announcement? I know it depends on staffing, but what is the trend if they don't fulfill their quota. thanks
                        Youre looking at about 6 months give or take if the trend continues. Seems like 2 maybe 3 openings per year, but who knows?

                        Comment


                        • Unprofessional CBP Officers

                          Originally posted by jwm0516 View Post
                          Saw this over on Delphi, figured it was worth the cross post. Take a look at the comments on the URL for this article. Talk about a hatefest. People need to get a clue.
                          Welcome to the world of "some" unprofessional CBP Officers. They eventually get weeded out depending word to the Chief of their division. You should see how we have to answer the phone now because of ONE PERSON here @ SFO.

                          Imagine the damage control now at the articles airport.

                          Unfortunately, one, two, or in this case, a group of bad officers (that unlike us, who don't put there pants on one leg at a time -- get it?) ruins it for the rest of the good officers.

                          And some wonder of low morale? Go figure.

                          Comment


                          • Merlin,

                            Thank you for the great response!

                            Originally posted by merlin436 View Post
                            People who fail for medical reasons include those who have heart attacks, strokes, and other medical emergencies. They also include those with previously know 'injuries' like diabetes and such who find they can't keep up with the program. I suppose that it's possible to get the original clearance for a pre-existing injury ( like broken back or such) and then be removed from the program later on, but it would be rare.


                            Most people who out medically leave on the basis of injuries occured at FLETC.


                            2)If you get bounced from the academy are you automatically jobless? Can you file for unemployment?

                            People who leave on the basis of injury are often allowed to recycle and sometimes penciled in to do 'soft-duty' jobs at their port, those who leave for academics or firearms are seldom allowed to recycle.

                            2)Uniform: Are you allowed to wear your uniform home after work, or when you pop in to grab your Starbucks after work. etc.? Or are you supposed to take it off at your POE.

                            You can wear your uniform to and from work. This of course leads to officer safety issues. Often it's best not to wear it to and fro or to wear a cover shirt while driving. As far as stopping off to grab a coffee or a Pepsi at Starsucks or the local 'stop and rob' for gas, a Dew and a doughnut, that's not usually a problem...but it may not be all that great of an idea.(officer safety wise)

                            Going in uniform to buy beer(it happens), family grocery shopping at Target, getting that wide-screen TV at Best Buys, etc. is a bad idea and will probably bring you grief. Anything that you do while in uniform that you think might bring you grief most probably will.

                            Think of it this way, anything you do with you uniform on creates a nexus between your actions at the time and your job. Management will be more than happy to view your off-duty use of the uniform in the most negative light. Use common sense and cover shirts and you probably won't have issues.

                            Comment


                            • Just saw this thread now. Probably should have posted in here first. I was just wondering if any of you guys have any tips or advice for taking the test? I have the study guide, and I will be looking that over.

                              I got a call today just confirming my application. Seemed like the process isn't going to be all that slow. I take the test and get the results the same day. After a few weeks, I'm called in for a interview. After that, I guess I start all the fun stuff?

                              I have a security clearance in the military, do you guys think that will speed up my background check?

                              Are any of you guys prior military? I was reading over the website and it was saying that most of the boarder patrol is made up of veterans. I wonder how much this will help me in being selected?

                              Lol I was planning on just going straight into college, but idk I'm 23 now and kind of don't want to deal with kids straight out of high school. I want to get out of the Navy and just go right into a respectable career. Work on my degree while I'm employeed.

                              Any information you guys could provide would be appreciated.

                              Thanks!

                              Brian

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by GTO23 View Post
                                Just saw this thread now. Probably should have posted in here first. I was just wondering if any of you guys have any tips or advice for taking the test? I have the study guide, and I will be looking that over.

                                I got a call today just confirming my application. Seemed like the process isn't going to be all that slow. I take the test and get the results the same day. After a few weeks, I'm called in for a interview. After that, I guess I start all the fun stuff?

                                I have a security clearance in the military, do you guys think that will speed up my background check?

                                Are any of you guys prior military? I was reading over the website and it was saying that most of the boarder patrol is made up of veterans. I wonder how much this will help me in being selected?

                                Lol I was planning on just going straight into college, but idk I'm 23 now and kind of don't want to deal with kids straight out of high school. I want to get out of the Navy and just go right into a respectable career. Work on my degree while I'm employeed.

                                Any information you guys could provide would be appreciated.

                                Thanks!

                                Brian
                                Im ex military and i dont really think it speeds up anything. Its pretty good for qualifying a person for the entry level positions, but other than that and the vet points you may qualify for, its not that big of a deal. And they do a seperate BI since the military is normally a "secret", etc. clearance and for CBP its a law enforcement sensitive clearance, so its different. The test aint that tough, just brush up on your basic math skills since there is no calculators or anything allowed.

                                Comment

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