Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Leaving New Zealand: what are my chances?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Leaving New Zealand: what are my chances?

    I'm 24 years old and I currently work for the New Zealand Police in a non-sworn position. Essentially we track forensic results, audit police files, and respond to official and public information requests. While not being particularly interesting itself, the job has inspired me to pursue a career in Law enforcement. I have a liberal arts MA (masters degree) majoring in English, which may not seem particularly relevant, but at least I could write up a good report. I have no criminal history at home or abroad, however I did experiment with marijuana in my late teens; never owned or purchased, smoked on maybe 8 to 10 occasions.

    My partner is an American citizen and we expect to marry within a year or so and settle back in the states (proably WA or CA). I was hoping that some of you would be able to answer my questions.

    Firstly, I'm aware that most American PDs require US citizenship. I don't expect to be naturalized untill im 28 or 29. With that in mind:

    1) Is age 28-30 too late to be starting a LE career, particularly if you would like to proceed to an investigative level and perhaps work in Federal LE?

    2) Which departments to not require citizenship? (I'm aware someone made a comprehensive post in this regard, but I have not been able to find it) Is it likely that the citizenship requirement may be dropped in some places in the near future?

    3) Will my status as a naturalized citizen, as opposed to a citizen by birth, be any hinderance to me in reality?

    4) Given my education, current job and the fact that I intend to learn a couple of languages in the next few years (hopefully), what do you think my chances are for sucess in eventually getting a job?

    I apologize for the length of this post, but any answers would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Hi there Daev,

    I'm in a similar situation to you - I'll be moving to the US from the UK later this year (getting married in November), although in my case I've had no LE related experience to speak of (graduating college this year in Materials engineering). Anyhow, here is the comprehensive list of States and their Citizenship requirements (which was compiled by Napes, so give him full credit for it! )

    Alaska

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks, that's just the post I was looking for. Sounds like we are in the same boat, although I'm only starting to navigate the whole immigration minefield. No doubt I'll get back to you

      Comment


      • #4
        Anyone have any opinions on the other three questions?

        Comment


        • #5
          I didnt get hired until I was 31...so no that is not too old. Departments often hire candidates with more life experience or those coming out of the military who are older and more experienced.

          Comment


          • #6
            1) Is age 28-30 too late to be starting a LE career, particularly if you would like to proceed to an investigative level and perhaps work in Federal LE?

            No, in fact most depts like older applicants. It will take 3 yrs from the time you get your green card to become a US citizen. The cutoff for federal jobs is 37, so you have time.

            2) Which departments to not require citizenship? (I'm aware someone made a comprehensive post in this regard, but I have not been able to find it) Is it likely that the citizenship requirement may be dropped in some places in the near future?

            There are over 18,000 US LE agencies. Dozens of them do not require citizenship. ALL Cali agencies require citizenship by state law. Only 2 small WA agencies don't require it. If you move to CA you will have to wait until you are either a US citizen (3 yrs) or if you work in WA you will severely reduce the number of depts you can work for. It is very likely, given the crisi in recruiting around the US in policing, that more states will drop the citizenship requirement. I would suggest if possible, you relocate to a state which doesn't have the requirement by state law, such as Colorado.

            3) Will my status as a naturalized citizen, as opposed to a citizen by birth, be any hinderance to me in reality?

            No, federal law prohibits that discrimination.

            4) Given my education, current job and the fact that I intend to learn a couple of languages in the next few years (hopefully), what do you think my chances are for sucess in eventually getting a job?

            You will get a job, it depends with which dept. Be aware that US depts highly value military and prior police experience. Your masters (in that field) won't impress too many depts. They are far more militeristic than the NZP, the academies can be brutal.

            Kia kaha.
            It is not the critic who counts...

            Comment

            MR300x250 Tablet

            Collapse

            What's Going On

            Collapse

            There are currently 9373 users online. 313 members and 9060 guests.

            Most users ever online was 19,482 at 12:44 PM on 09-29-2011.

            Welcome Ad

            Collapse
            Working...
            X