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Drug use that isn't your own when it comes to getting hired/clearance

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  • Drug use that isn't your own when it comes to getting hired/clearance

    answered, thanks
    Last edited by Culper1773; 07-16-2017, 02:17 PM.

  • slamdunc
    replied
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    If we are talking about OPM let's not act like their system for background's as a whole is that thorough.
    I wasn't referring to OPM; their agents read their questions from a script. So far this year, I've had four of them across the desk from me doing BI on former and present employees. Three of them weren't even looking at me when I answered their questions; my body could have been telling a different story than my mouth lol.
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    It takes a certain kind of person to be a GOOD background investigator
    It does and I am.
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    OPM hires anybody who can pass a TS. It's more like the inmates running the prison if you know what I mean.
    I would have to agree.
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    Long story short and I respectfully say this, if you were referring to 6 passed OPM backgrounds let's not use that as the standard of good background investigations because we all know it is not. If you were talking about local agencies then that is a different story.
    Five were local / county and one (and oddly, one of the most thorough) was Union Pacific. I wasn't counting my security clearance (TS: SCI) and they (DoD) didn't even polygraph me for that. What they did do at that time was to compare the National Security Questionnaire that I completed for the clearance to the one that I filled out prior to entering the military. They checked for consistency and they (at the time the Defense Investigative Service) sent agents to everywhere I had worked, lived and gone to school.
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    My old police department's background was insanely tougher than any federal background I've ever undergone. It ranged from listing EVERY job you've ever had to listing EVERY residence you've ever lived more than 90 days. For my fellow veterans they know how tedious that can be.
    I would also agree wholeheartedly with this.
    Originally posted by kwaz View Post
    Long story short if a BI wants to find dirt on you he/she can. It totally depends how deep down the rabbit hole they want to go.
    From where I stand, they won't go very far down the 'rabbit hole' IF everything else is lining up. I wouldn't waste much time on trying to find dirt on someone who isn't shady and doesn't associate with dopers & criminals.

    Leave a comment:


  • o2force10
    replied
    The idea of avoiding questionable associations goes beyond simply passing a background investigation, its expected of you throughout your entire career. A lot of cops, myself included, had to "say goodbye" to someone in their life because of that person's activities or associations. As an officer of the law, the public puts its trust in you to be both fair and ethical. It is your responsibility to maintain that trust and keep yourself out of situations that may compromise your integrity. Ask anyone in internal affairs and they will tell you that a lot of dirty officers/agents turned in part because of their associations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Culper1773
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
    If you associate with criminals (such as dopers) you can be disqualified. The girlfriend in question, the dope-head, is a criminal due to the fact that she either manufactures (grows) OR purchases her dope AND she possesses it. As any of these things are illegal, and you know about it, you are associating with a criminal. I was typing slowly so that you can absorb it as you obviously are waiting for an answer you want to hear, such as:
    Following advise such as ^^^this^^^ will get you on the wrong side of your BI and polygraph examiner.

    Well that isn't the case but nevertheless thank you and everybody else for their contribution to the tread. Appreciate it.
    Last edited by Culper1773; 07-16-2017, 02:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • kwaz
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
    I may not be that smart, but I have been through six and passed them all (with a bit of baggage of my own). I have conducted many and I always ask a lot of questions relating not so much to family members, but definitely associates. Just a curious question; do they polygraph where you work as a police officer?

    If the op has a girlfriend that smokes dope, my recommendation would be to pass on him. I hate the white hats / black hats speech as much as anyone else, but if someone is wanting to be the police, they need to be all-in. And yes, if my wife / girlfriend / fiancee, etc. was a doper, I'd ditch her.

    If we are talking about OPM let's not act like their system for background's as a whole is that thorough. I equate them to every other branch of the government. Ineffective, half-a**ed, lazy, etc etc etc. If they did their jobs as it was intended or as they were supposed to, half the people in the federal government would have never been hired.

    It takes a certain kind of person to be a GOOD background investigator, OPM hires anybody who can pass a TS. It's more like the inmates running the prison if you know what I mean. Long story short and I respectfully say this, if you were referring to 6 passed OPM backgrounds let's not use that as the standard of good background investigations because we all know it is not. If you were talking about local agencies then that is a different story.

    My old police department's background was insanely tougher than any federal background I've ever undergone. It ranged from listing EVERY job you've ever had to listing EVERY residence you've ever lived more than 90 days. For my fellow veterans they know how tedious that can be. Long story short if a BI wants to find dirt on you he/she can. It totally depends how deep down the rabbit hole they want to go.
    Last edited by kwaz; 06-16-2016, 08:40 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustAJ
    replied
    Many years ago, a good friend of mine who is now a ranking member of a local agency has his background put on hold because his younger brother's friend had a record. Not a bad guy, just made some bad choices and was living with them until he could get back on his feet. The agency would not move forward until the guy moved out. YMMV.

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdunc
    replied
    Originally posted by camarritt2011 View Post
    Unless your spouse is a drug lord is this really something that can DQ you?
    If you associate with criminals (such as dopers) you can be disqualified. The girlfriend in question, the dope-head, is a criminal due to the fact that she either manufactures (grows) OR purchases her dope AND she possesses it. As any of these things are illegal, and you know about it, you are associating with a criminal. I was typing slowly so that you can absorb it as you obviously are waiting for an answer you want to hear, such as:
    Originally posted by Esco View Post
    Back grounds don't ask about close friends, they ask about you. Answer the questions as they relate to you, if you get to volunteering info about your family and friends, not a smart move on your part. Don't read to far into the questions.
    Following advise such as ^^^this^^^ will get you on the wrong side of your BI and polygraph examiner.

    Leave a comment:


  • aspiring_fed
    replied
    Yep. It might not DQ you, but it might. Again, it depends on the circumstances and what the agency cares about. Your safest bet is to just ditch anyone who uses illicit drugs. It might suck, but you have to think about your career.

    Leave a comment:


  • Culper1773
    replied
    Originally posted by aspiring_fed View Post
    I have been asked specifically about "family, friends, and associates who use drugs" on background packets.
    Last edited by Culper1773; 07-16-2017, 02:18 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCCSD
    replied
    Originally posted by Esco View Post
    Lol, and if you've been thru a few and are smart, you give them exactly what they ask, and nothing more.
    You are a fool. Stop posting bs.

    Pick up your shine box on the way out.

    Leave a comment:


  • aspiring_fed
    replied
    I have been asked specifically about "family, friends, and associates who use drugs" on background packets.

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdunc
    replied
    Originally posted by Esco View Post
    Lol, and if you've been thru a few and are smart, you give them exactly what they ask, and nothing more.
    I may not be that smart, but I have been through six and passed them all (with a bit of baggage of my own). I have conducted many and I always ask a lot of questions relating not so much to family members, but definitely associates. Just a curious question; do they polygraph where you work as a police officer?

    If the op has a girlfriend that smokes dope, my recommendation would be to pass on him. I hate the white hats / black hats speech as much as anyone else, but if someone is wanting to be the police, they need to be all-in. And yes, if my wife / girlfriend / fiancee, etc. was a doper, I'd ditch her.

    Leave a comment:


  • Esco
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdunc View Post
    Work a lot of backgrounds do you? As a matter of FACT, anyone worth a crap at backgrounds DOES ask about close friends. A good BI will peel back a couple of layers and will ask who you associate with, they will speak with those people and then ask them who else you associate with.

    Lol, and if you've been thru a few and are smart, you give them exactly what they ask, and nothing more.

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdunc
    replied
    Originally posted by Esco View Post
    Back grounds don't ask about close friends, they ask about you. Answer the questions as they relate to you, if you get to volunteering info about your family and friends, not a smart move on your part.
    Work a lot of backgrounds do you? As a matter of FACT, anyone worth a crap at backgrounds DOES ask about close friends. A good BI will peel back a couple of layers and will ask who you associate with, they will speak with those people and then ask them who else you associate with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Esco
    replied
    Originally posted by camarritt2011 View Post
    No, I'm 27 and applying to the Army CID program. I don't have anything to hide in the SSBI personally but some in my family I wouldn't be able to say the same for. Just trying to get a general idea of what to expect.

    edit; I do plan on being honest either way, just overthinking it probably
    Don't overthink. Answer the question they ask.

    Leave a comment:

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