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  • #76
    I loved leaving base for China Town.. MMMMM love the BBQ'd MonaPuah!!!

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    • #77
      Went through China Town a few times on the way to D&B and Buca di Beppos in Waikiki but never stopped anywhere. Wish now that I had at least once.


      Smurfed from my iSmurf using Smurf

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Fuganopolis View Post
        Went through China Town a few times on the way to D&B and Buca di Beppos in Waikiki but never stopped anywhere. Wish now that I had at least once.


        Smurfed from my iSmurf using Smurf
        oh ha! after a night of Adult Consumption in Moderation, of course, it was great to stop in for steamed dumplins with bbq'd pork stuffings!!

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Bearcat357 View Post
          I'd go back to Hawaii in a heart-beat.... but that's just me as living in the military out there and living as a civilian out there are completely different.....but that's just me.
          I'm really curious about what you mean in regards to that? I would love to live out there.

          Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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          • #80
            Originally posted by MetroEast View Post
            I'm really curious about what you mean in regards to that? I would love to live out there.

            Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
            HUGE difference in base housing costs and living as a civilian...

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            • #81
              Not only the costs, but the quality as well. Off post, most of the "affordable" housing were either apartments or less than stellar homes. I actually got lucky and found a new 2 bedroom condo in Kapolei/Makakilo for only 2 grand a month. On post housing, as far as Schofield Barracks from 07-10 goes, was mostly WWII era bungalows with no AC. My last year there, they built new housing that was actually pretty nice, but O's got first dibs at them. My BAH each month as a married NCO was 2200 and that paid the rent and most of the 350 electric bill. Again, this is only my experience from 07-10 with the army. Other branches at other posts may have been different.

              Work/home life between military and civilians are another story all together. One that could possibly fill a novel. In reality though, most of the differences are not relegated to just Hawaii, but most other military posts in the U.S. as well. There will be some differences, such as the availability and quality of off-post housing at Benning was much better/affordable than Hawaii.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by hpy1 View Post
                Pi, aka 3.14, and I had a little back and forth a while back about this topic. He advised me I came off a bitter, so please don't hate on me for posting this and please don't think I'm here to to just whine and moan (I kind of was whining and moaning back when Pi was saying I was bitter.) I'm simply putting this out there for the folks that don't know this or haven't heard of this. Same as my earlier post about the USSS. All I'm saying is do you homework, have a series of serious conversations with your spouse/significant other before accepting a position with HSI. I'm not bitter or upset. I'm just trying to lay it all out there so you have an idea of what some of the issues are.

                HSI is a different agency if you are on the border or if you are at an interior/northern border office. The agency claims border agents are important; however, consistently, takes actions that are inconsistent with that statement.

                SWB Agents generally speaking are not permitted to go on any sort of detail. Often they aren't selected for post academy training either. Many SWB agents beg to go on details and are told no. In lieu interior/north border office agents are volun-told to go, or just get to go while the SWB guy plug away at work. Until recently the agency was allowing non-SWB agents to seeming move after 3 years at an office while telling SWB agents they were too important to be permitted to transfer. SWB agents make up 35% (if I recall properly) of the workforce and approximately 60%-70% (my guess-I have no facts to back that up) of the production statistics. Meaning, you get worked harder than the rest of the country while receiving the same paycheck and being told maybe we can let you move next year, again, and again.

                The real question is how does this affect a career especially if someone wants to move up the ladder. It is a hard question though because agents on the border learn and do so much work in short time they quickly learn the ropes. So does the work experience equal what you learn or get to do on details or in training? Or even more importantly, the connections you make with over offices as we all the know the age old adage, it isn't what who know but who you know.

                I will say, the agency claims, to be moving in a better direction to try and help transfer agents off the border. I will also say in the last 12 months I've heard of and seen more border agents get to on TDYs than any other time in my career. Time will tell if it they are giving lip service (about moving agents off the border) or if they are really going to follow through.

                Also, think about the remoteness of where you are going to live. Does your spouse speak Spanish? Do your kids speak Spanish? If you are not Hispanic, how do you think you will adjust to being a minority? to a new culture? Do your family members have health issues that can be handled in the town in which you are taking the position. Can you afford to fly to see your family for the holidays? Will your family visit you where you are stationed? (Never mind if you want them to visit or not.) Are you okay, with your kids going to school with the kids of the people you arrest? Are you okay with the quality of the school your kids will attend? Are you okay with driving an hour or two or three to the mall? To the hospital? To Walmart, etc?

                NYC, LA, and SFO agents have to deal with some of the same issues as the SWB agents. They aren't being permitted to move at the 3 year mark. They have to deal with a super high cost of living vs. the remoteness of the SWB. Plus the traffic they deal with to get to work etc. The good news is, you're not in a remote location and you get things that some SWB agents consider a luxury. Which is better or worse depends on what you want/need where you live.

                I'm not claiming the border is worse than the cities or vice versa. I truly just want anyone and everyone taking this job to really take a moment and think about what a move to those locations will mean for them and their family.

                I hope that helps any and all of you considering taking this position.
                This is solid insight and it's much appreciated. Out of curiosity, do NYC/LA/SF agents get the same level/degree (if not type) of work experiences as SWB agents, or are the similarities mainly some of the shared hardships? In other words, are they looking to fill the metro cities mainly because the high cost of living keeps folks away, or because there is a lot of work driving the need for bodies (or both)?


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by 1811_Z View Post
                  This is solid insight and it's much appreciated. Out of curiosity, do NYC/LA/SF agents get the same level/degree (if not type) of work experiences as SWB agents, or are the similarities mainly some of the shared hardships? In other words, are they looking to fill the metro cities mainly because the high cost of living keeps folks away, or because there is a lot of work driving the need for bodies (or both)?


                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                  The SWB offices do a lot of seizure call outs, bag and tags, controlled deliveries etc.

                  NY and LA do them too but the work in those offices is much more diverse. Financial, CPI, cyber, JTTF, etc.

                  I think the larger offices just have more regular vacancies. The COL keeps people looking to move to cheaper locales, just as it does in any line of work. People don't usually want to spend their retirement in NY and CA.
                  Before science, it was believed that autumn was caused by Chuck Norris simultaneously roundhouse kicking every tree on the planet.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by MetroEast View Post
                    I'm really curious about what you mean in regards to that? I would love to live out there.
                    Military folks tend to leave.....and the locals are apt to not make friendships with you.... and they are treated differently.

                    Where as folks coming out there for work.....and wanting to stay there for good (like me when I get back out there) will have better success making friends with them.

                    I love my local friends out there......just a different type of folk at times due to either being born there or living there so long....

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by PHSeaBee View Post
                      HUGE difference in base housing costs and living as a civilian...
                      That....and as stated....you will be treated differently by the locals if you are military compaired to someone that has a "real" job and is wanting to stay there for a very long time/food good.

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by Fuganopolis View Post
                        Not only the costs,
                        Work/home life between military and civilians are another story all together. One that could possibly fill a novel. In reality though, most of the differences are not relegated to just Hawaii, but most other military posts in the U.S. as well. There will be some differences, such as the availability and quality of off-post housing at Benning was much better/affordable than Hawaii.
                        Cost of living out there sucks but you do get extra money as a GOV Employee to help cover that....plus as a S/A you will be getting LEAP as well. You just have to learn where to shop/eat/hang out to keep costs down.....

                        Traffic absolutely sucks now. Where you lived, would take you a good 1.5 hours (at least) to get into the Fed Building now days.


                        As stated, locals will treat you different if you are military compared to a civilian. If you're looking to get local friends, first thing out of your mouth shouldn't be, "I can't wait to do my 3-5 years and get the hell out of here...."

                        Also, if you have family, the schools aren't the best in the world.... Most folks send their kids to private school and that costs out the rear.....

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                        • #87
                          SA don't get BAH, do they? Just LEAP and COLA? Traffic has always sucked on O'ahu. Rush hour seemed to start at about 2 in the afternoon and H1 would be backed up all the way to H2 in Mililani by 215. It would be like this until around 7 at night. Kapolei is only like 5 miles from Schofield. I would leave at 515 each morning and it would still take almost 30-45 minutes because of traffic to get to post and go through the gate.

                          IIRC, when I was there, there were about 2-3 million people on the island, with military from all 5 branches making up a butt load (I want to say around 45-50%). There were just more cars than that tiny little island could reasonably support.

                          I couldn't agree more about the locals. I knew many that were great people, but many more would rather swim all the way to the Big Island and crawl up Mona Loa just to flip you off than they had stand 5 feet in front of you and say hello.

                          Waianae was, for me, the worst part. Forgetting the drugs and gangs and bums there, but the attitude towards mainlanders. I was on my way to Yokohama beach and along side the road on the beach where all the bums lived, they had made hand painted banners saying crap like bring back our kings and queens or we don't want "Americans" on our island. When you're looking at like 50 of these signs as your creeping by in traffic, it can give you pause.

                          The schools...what else can you say. Hawaii ranks in the bottom 1 or 2 as the worst school systems in the country (at least during my time).

                          I do miss it though. I loved hearing people speak Pigeon and hearing horror stories about Mahus. The weather and scenic beauty have been unmatched from my experience (I've traveled stateside and abroad for different deployments, but only to *****ty places). Unless I hit it big in the lottery or strike it rich selling a homemade line of European sex toys, I'll only ever go back for a couple of weeks at a time.

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                          • #88
                            hahaha okay, was Hawaii one of the locations on the announcement and I just don't remember??

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                            • #89
                              Sure it was. That was why they closed the vacancy and then reopened it. They had to take Hawaii off the list.

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by 1811_Z View Post
                                This is solid insight and it's much appreciated. Out of curiosity, do NYC/LA/SF agents get the same level/degree (if not type) of work experiences as SWB agents, or are the similarities mainly some of the shared hardships? In other words, are they looking to fill the metro cities mainly because the high cost of living keeps folks away, or because there is a lot of work driving the need for bodies (or both)?


                                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                                Can't speak to the work any answers I give would be a guess. As the Canadians say, Sorry, ehh.

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