Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to get hired ?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to get hired ?

    Alright i was wondering if i could get some information from any Police Officers who might have some ideas for me. I live in a small Massachusetts town, I recently graduated from the local high school. I know age is a big thing in getting hired, most PD's is 21, and i'm only 18, but i'm just try to get myself set so I don't waste time. I was thinking of going into the military but decieded against it (although i've heard that it helps a lot on the tough civil service in Mass.) Everyone I know has been telling me how hard it is to get a job in MA. but i'm just trying to figure out what I can do to increase my chances.

    I plan on starting college next year and getting a two-year degree in criminal justice. I can't afford to go full time, so I'm planning on going part time and working somewhere else full time, I've heard that some departments hire college students for jobs around the station (I.E. assisting officers, doing paperwork ect.) I just haven't found any local departments that offer that. I'd take anytyhing to get in the door. But is there anything i can do while earning my degree that will help me get hired ???
    P.S. I'm not limiting myself to the local area, I will do anything to get my degree and get on a PD.

    Thanks
    Last edited by JSicko; 10-30-2003, 05:52 PM.

  • #2
    I just wanted to give you a little information on the hiring practices in New Jersey. Like Mass. it is also difficult to be hired. However, there are several ways of getting hired. Some New Jersey jurisdictions are Civil Service. This means that they hire off of a State Civil Service list. In January, the state places the announcement on their website, www.state.nj.us/personnel. These towns/county jurisdictions are bound by the policies set forth by the civil service department and it is the best way to get hired. Civil Service guidelines state that you can be hired at age 18 and the only educational requirement is a high school diploma or its equivalence. NJ only gives veterans preference to those who have been deemed by the state as served in a combat/hostile area, and they make the decision if you qualify.

    Other towns are what are called "Chief's Test" towns. These towns administer their own test and have their own guidelines. Most of these towns require you to be 21 years old, have at least 60 college credits or military experience. There is no schedule for these tests and each town administers their test on a different date. Just as a word of caution, these types of test tend to become very political.

    A third way, which is relatively new, is known as the alternative route. This is when a qualified person, pays his/her own way through the police academy, then with their certification in hand they apply to different jurisdictions. As another word of caution, this system is very new and it is usually very difficult to find jurisdictions to hire this way. But it is starting to gain momentum in Central and Southern New Jersey. Some jurisdictions are beginning to like this route because they have nothing to loose. They're not paying for your training and your salary during training, so it is a win - win situation for them.

    Now for my personal advice, if you are determined to become a police officer take every test possible. The process tends to become very redundant, rigorous, and discouraging but you're still young and you still have a lot of time. I believe that the best route is to take tests administered by larger cities. Cities tend to pay less, but they are known to hire large groups of officers at one time. If at a later time, you do not feel that a large city is for you, you can transfer to a smaller one.

    Good Luck

    Comment


    • #3
      "A third way, which is relatively new, is known as the alternative route. This is when a qualified person, pays his/her own way through the police academy, then with their certification in hand they apply to different jurisdictions. As another word of caution, this system is very new and it is usually very difficult to find jurisdictions to hire this way. But it is starting to gain momentum in Central and Southern New Jersey. Some jurisdictions are beginning to like this route because they have nothing to loose. They're not paying for your training and your salary during training, so it is a win - win situation for them."

      What? Difficult to find jurisdictions hiring this way?? Man, where I am most of the departments won't hire you unless you're already OPOTC trained! I'm going through the academy next semester per open enrollment. And I'm actually going to get 6 credits towards my degree for it too!

      Comment


      • #4
        Cadet/Assistance Programs

        Thanks, i'll check that out. Does anyone have any info of local departments or any PD's that have cadet programs or anytime of work program that you can do while in college and that can help with getting on the job ???

        Comment


        • #5
          In NJ most of the time you have to get hired by a police department before you can go to the academy. That Alternative route is so new that only a few counties in NJ offer it. (We are alwys last to change things).

          Now, for the cadet question... we have a couple of towns which hire Special Police Officers. Specials are sent to a Police Academy for Specials. There are two types, Special I are not permitted to carry a weapon. Special IIs are permitted to carry weapons while on duty only. Towns that hire Specials usually use this way as opening the door to prospective police officers. In a praticular town in NJ the only way to become an officer in the town is by being a special first for a period of two years. I like a part time job during school.

          Also, some towns have what are called Auxillary Police. These officers are also sent to a different type of police academy. The majority of these officers do not carry weapons, but each town has the right to permit the officers if they wish. The Auxillary police officers, although, assigned to a police department they fall under the control of the Office of Emergency Management.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would recommend getting your four year degree from somewhere!
            If you cannot afford it, maybe you can try something like ROTC. The army will probably pay your way through school, you owe them a little time afterwards (probably two years) but when you are out, a lot of departments will be salivating to hire you. The other option would be to get some student loans and look into some kind of Police Corps thing. In South Carolina we have a Police Corps program where every summer you are off in College you do academy training for 2 months and they give you a stipend, you also have weekly stuff during the school year. By the time you graduate you are a certified officer. Whatever route you choose - good luck to ya!
            "For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, they are plans for peace and not disaster, plans to give you a hope and a future." Jeremiah 29:11

            Comment


            • #7
              Reading this forum shows me exactly how different things are throughout the country. Here in S. FL, any agency will hire you if you are not certified. Only 3-4 of them require college. Once you go through the process, and hired... you are then sent to the academy (22 weeks). While in the academy, the department pays you your salary, and pays for the academy. All but one agency down here that I can think of buys you all of your equiptment as well, including your firearm, unless you work for SO, they give you everything but the firearm. You can put yourself through the academy in different areas of the state, but the only way to get in down here is if you are already hired by a PD. If you are already certified from another dept or area of the state, that increases your chances of being hired. However, a lot of departments are leary of people who got certified in different academies in the northern end of the state. The feeling is that the training is not NEARLY the same.
              In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

              In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

              Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

              I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


              The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

              Comment


              • #8
                To sflcop: Looks like in this post you realize things are different from department to department, you should of thought about that before you made a smart alleck comment about my KCMO post in Ask a Cop.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by candog
                  To sflcop: Looks like in this post you realize things are different from department to department, you should of thought about that before you made a smart alleck comment about my KCMO post in Ask a Cop.
                  candog... post was not smart alleck at all. If you go back and read my reply, perhaps you will see that. Us LEO's sometimes have a way of taking questions the wrong way. However, it is a bit immature to post like you did here. Yes, things are different from department to department. I do not think there is a "way to be" on an interview. As I said in my other post... if you have the want and desire, as well as all the qualifications, and a clean backround, be YOURSELF and you will become a LEO. No hard feelings were intended
                  In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

                  In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

                  Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

                  I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


                  The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE]Originally posted by sflcop
                    However, a lot of departments are leary of people who got certified in different academies in the northern end of the state. The feeling is that the training is not NEARLY the same.

                    I resent that LOL. The training up here in the pan handle is very good. (I think) As to what you said about it being hard to self sponsor yourself in fl. Before i decided to go to school in the panhandle I was researching schools all across the state. I know broward community college doesent let you in w/out being hired but the majority of the rest will. I decided to go to school up north because the tuition in 1200 dollars compared to 2200 in sarasota and 6000 in panama city beach.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I cannot speak for academies other than Broward and Miami. Neither of which will let you self sponsor. The Florida CJSTC just adopted a new standard curriculum for all academies. However, prior to this the training was not the same at all. You would consistently hear officers and trainers at the academy say that it is different up north, just because people are different. Policing is generally the same all around, but south FL, like NY or LA is different from anyplace else.
                      In law enforcement, the customer is ALWAYS wrong.

                      In God we trust. Everyone else is run through NCIC.

                      Sometimes there is justice. Sometimes there is just us.

                      I'd rather be tried by 12 then carried by 6.


                      The opinions given in my posts do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        GOOD LUCK

                        Hey buddy, I have some bad news for you. I'm from Ma. (Western) and unless you live in the hill towns or small non civil service towns, your chances are slim. First if you want to work in a civil service town, you must be able to prove that you lived there 1 full year prior to tacking the exam. Your vet status will move you up on the list. If your a minority you get 5 extra points on the test. Female minority = 10 points. Then affirmitive action will kick in. If you go non-civil service then its like appling for any other kind of job. The pay will be realy low--$9-$12.00hr. The bad news is that you work for the CHIEF amd not the town, per say. If he wants to hire his son's friend, your going to get let go so theres a spot available. Sorry, but thats the way it is.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Getting Hired

                          GO Military. You can get experience plus they will pay for your degree when you get out. In PA you get bonus points for military experience. The Military would give you an edge to get hired by any Local, State or Federal agency.

                          Comment

                          MR300x250 Tablet

                          Collapse

                          What's Going On

                          Collapse

                          There are currently 6057 users online. 253 members and 5804 guests.

                          Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                          Welcome Ad

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X