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  • Nola504
    replied
    dsb05c....have you guys interviewed for any transfers or new hires? I see that your district has had the vacancy announcement up for a while. I was looking into possibly applying. I went to FLETC with a officer in your office.

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  • dsb05c
    replied
    I work in the middle district.

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  • AC2011
    replied
    DSB05C, what district do you work out of in FL?

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  • dsb05c
    replied
    Badge no... Gun yes at least in my district. After fletc, you have to request in writing to carry a gun and the chief judge signs off.

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  • jdg0044
    replied
    Do you have to wait until after FLETC before they issue you a gun and badge?

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  • GA12
    replied
    Originally posted by AC2011 View Post
    GA12, how much mobility are you talking about?
    Once a position opens in the district you'd like to relocate to you have to apply like everyone else but it's referred to as "transferring" and it happens quite often. You would certainly get preference if you have been doing the job and have been to FLETC. It's also an incentive that you would know what you're doing from the first day. The system is uniform so the way they do things in ND/TX is the same as SD/NY and so on. Little things may be different like specific protocols but you would likely be able to hit the ground running

    Money-wise it makes sense to transfer during your first 5 years because once you start making $70k+ districts won't want to hire you as an entry level officer because it isn't cost efficient. They also don't have to pay you what you are making in your current district. My $.02...

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  • AC2011
    replied
    GA12, how much mobility are you talking about?

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  • Nola504
    replied
    Originally posted by rtv View Post
    just came upon this thread and find it helpful. i recently applied to a couple of USPO positions in the midwest. i've got a ba in criminal justice and two years of federal correctional officer experience working primarily in max security at a FCI. it seems that most USPO's who have provided input say that a masters degree plus experience is the ticket to getting hired. are there many out there who have only bachelors degree and less than, say 3 years experience? i didn't initially realize it was so highly competitive. thx.
    I got hired with just a bachelors degree and several other officers that I work got hired with a bachelors as well. Most districts PREFER the but you can get hired without it. It is recommended. I had 4 1/2 yrs with county juvenile probation. I served in specialized positions and served on several committees to help myself look better as a candidate. I would highly highly recommended that if you are on the state/county level of probation that you get as much experience in presentence reports as you can as most districts hire for that position. It is rare that you go straight into supervision.

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  • GA12
    replied
    Originally posted by rtv View Post
    just came upon this thread and find it helpful. i recently applied to a couple of USPO positions in the midwest. i've got a ba in criminal justice and two years of federal correctional officer experience working primarily in max security at a FCI. it seems that most USPO's who have provided input say that a masters degree plus experience is the ticket to getting hired. are there many out there who have only bachelors degree and less than, say 3 years experience? i didn't initially realize it was so highly competitive. thx.
    We just interviewed a state CO in my district and he did well in the interview. I'd say it's possible to get the job coming from a corrections job. I'd take as much training as you can in evidence based practices and pump up your resume. Good luck and flood the gates with applications. Don't be afraid to relocate as this is a great job and has mobility once hired.

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  • dsb05c
    replied
    I'll also add that while serving as a POA, I got my masters and finally got promoted after graduating. But yeah, most if not all of our new hires have advanced degrees.

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  • jdg0044
    replied
    Originally posted by dsb05c View Post
    Yeah that's why I wasn't worried until they sent me a packet to fill out prior to the exam which shows a color vision test. I called HR to see if failing it would disqualify me, but she didn't know the answer. Hopefully it will all work out though.

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  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by PSOSAC View Post
    In my opinion, it's very competitive. If you have hopes of becoming a USPO or a USPSO I suggest you obtain some county or state experience to become more competitive. Unfortunately, working as a CO won't count as experience. Even though you deal with the same offenders.. Also keep in mind, if you leave your covered position for a state gig, any time you've already put in at your current covered fed position will count toward retirement should you ever return. So, you'll be able to return to the Feds xxx yrs over the age of 37. Just a thought.
    I'll chime in too. I believe it is very competitive as well. I'd say about 1/2 to 3/4ths of the officers in my district have an M.S. plus highly relevant experience (state/county PO or other fields that carry caseloads and do case management). Those that don't have an M.S. seem to have had to put in more time with relevant experience to make them more competitive.

    A lot of officers come in here with experience that "goes beyond" just being in the field for a long time and having good evaluations. Lots of officers were trainers or instructors at their previous gig. A lot had specialized caseloads or did a lot of stuff with task forces/outreach/etc. Although these positions have opened up a lot more this year, most districts can be extremely picky as to what they want. They have plenty of applicants.

    Just my view from my district. Could vary greatly from one to the next.

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  • PSOSAC
    replied
    ^^^ great idea ^^^

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  • dsb05c
    replied
    I had to get something checked out that turned into a long 3 month process just due to an abnormal EKG from a low heart rate. If there are any medical concerns, it is best to get ahead of them but not sure what you can do about color blindness. If you had your doctor or specialist state that it is low level and wouldn't hinder you, I would have that in hand just in case they tell you to see a specialist.

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  • PSOSAC
    replied
    Doesn't mention color blindness; therefore, it shouldn't be a disqualifying condition:

    Because officers must effectively deal with physical attacks and are subject to moderate to arduous physical exertion, applicants must be physically capable. Officers must possess, with or without corrective lenses, good distance vision in at least one eye and the ability to read normal size print. Normal hearing ability, with or without a hearing aid, is also required. Any severe health problems, such as physical defects, disease, and deformities that constitute employment hazards to the applicant or others, may disqualify an applicant. Examples of health problems that may be disqualifying are an untreated hernia, cardiovascular disorders, serious deformities or disabilities of the extremities, mental health disorders, fainting and/or seizure disorders, metabolic disorders, bleeding disorders, pulmonary disorders, and marked speech abnormalities.

    Leave a comment:

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