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  • jdg0044
    replied
    Experience is the key. I don't know of anyone who has started out with federal probation. I did 7 years with the county before I was finally hired with the feds, and every other officer I know had at least 3 years or more experience. My recommendation would be to start getting that experience as soon as you can.

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  • leonarmi
    replied
    I have been applying for a USPO for some time in various locations. From what I am reading here it must be due to my inexperience because I have gotten 0 interviews. I have an MA in Crim. Justice but can't seem to secure any employment due to my inexperience. Going through the process now in Mass and NY pretrial services officer.

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  • SaceLA
    replied
    Are there any other applicants on here currently waiting for FOH medical review results? I received a medical review form 3 weeks after i had my medical exam administered. The form asked for supplemental information in regards to my LASIK surgery I had back in July. I had my eye doctor fill out the form and I mailed it back to FOH with expedited shipping that same week but I have yet to hear back. I was wondering if this is normal time frame? It's now been an additional 3 weeks since they've received my supplemental form.

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  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by FTRSA View Post
    I have to ask.

    We have a recent transfer from USPO. This person claims significant criminal investigative experience, and firearms tactics to include high risk warrant service (USPO experience, nothing else, 2 yrs of service). However, from the work products and training on tactics; shows a gross deficiency for this transfer.

    For your standard USPO (no specialty assignments) is this the norm to have investigative experience and tactics?
    Is that the norm? Eh, depends. Very few (I'm talking like a handful of our 94 districts) allow USPO's to conduct arrests. I know of maybe two districts that allow their USPOs to do this. They are out there though, so it is definitely possible. Firearms tactics? Yes. Almost all of the 94 districts are armed and trained at FLETC or in district. Firearms training is continual. Officers can go back to FLETC to become firearms instructors for their districts, and they can do it relatively quickly. There are a couple districts that have chief judges who don't allow a firearms program (I think it's only one or two districts). So yes, firearms tactics are there.

    Investigative experience? Depends on what you qualify as investigative. Do we do investigations? Yes. Supervision officers have to go out an investigate proposed residences for current BOP inmates to determine suitability. Court services/pre-trial/pre-sentence officers do investigations by interviewing defendants, family members, checking records at various jails, prisons, PD's, clerks of court, etc etc. We do some investigations by collaborating with local PD's, generating enough information for violation reports, checking criminal histories, interviewing collateral contacts (family members, friends, treatment providers, etc etc). These are just a few examples. We don't directly conduct investigations in a manner to find and begin prosecution on new crimes though, which is what a lot of people think of when they think of investigative work. This is a grey area. I do know of a few districts that work right alongside US Marshals and assist in conducting surveillance and such, although this too is a rarity.

    Hope that helps. US Probation (and probation in general) is a really weird blend of stuff.
    Last edited by holycrikey; 11-14-2014, 02:09 PM.

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  • FTRSA
    replied
    Deleted post
    Last edited by FTRSA; 01-30-2016, 01:48 PM. Reason: Deleted post

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  • PSOSAC
    replied
    In my pursuit of an 1811 gig, being in a covered position with TS clearance has been looked upon favorably.

    That being said, your assignment once your in will play a roll when competing for an 1811 gig. Will you be sitting behind a desk all day writing PSR's, or will you be out and about serving warrants and making arrests? My .02 cents; choose your District wisely my friend.

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  • dsb05c
    replied
    Originally posted by holycrikey View Post
    Depends a ton on which 1811 position in which agency. Some may like it, some may not. A lot depends on their mission. I can say in a very generic manner that in my district, we've had a few USPOs move on to 1811 gigs and I've heard of the same at a few other districts. So it is definitely possible, but I think you'd need other work or experience to really stand out (as is the norm for 1811 gigs). At the very least, you'd get a tiny leg up by already being in a federally designated law enforcement position, even though in reality and practice, most districts are only maybe 40-50% law enforcement.
    Agree with this. Current USPO and going through the process for a 1811 position now. Have applied to several and gotten the not the most highly qualified response. It depends on how you list the investigative experience and some don't consider probarion law enforcent enough.

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  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by fnu_lnu View Post
    Hi, I am a current Investigator. If I took a position as a USPO, would that count as Federal investigative experience? I am wondering because I would like to become an 1811 someday and was wondering if it would be a good idea to do. There are other reasons why I am considering the position, but basically I'm wondering if would be looked at favorably by an 1811 agency.
    Depends a ton on which 1811 position in which agency. Some may like it, some may not. A lot depends on their mission. I can say in a very generic manner that in my district, we've had a few USPOs move on to 1811 gigs and I've heard of the same at a few other districts. So it is definitely possible, but I think you'd need other work or experience to really stand out (as is the norm for 1811 gigs). At the very least, you'd get a tiny leg up by already being in a federally designated law enforcement position, even though in reality and practice, most districts are only maybe 40-50% law enforcement.

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  • fnu_lnu
    replied
    Hi, I am a current Investigator. If I took a position as a USPO, would that count as Federal investigative experience? I am wondering because I would like to become an 1811 someday and was wondering if it would be a good idea to do. There are other reasons why I am considering the position, but basically I'm wondering if would be looked at favorably by an 1811 agency.

    Leave a comment:


  • DaBulls
    replied
    I recently applied for a USPO position in Pensacola, FL. I'm currently a Fed LEO with 6 years experience, a bachelor's in Criminology and am 3 classes shy of a Master's in Justice Studies w/ a concentration in Cybersecurity, which I will complete in May of 2015. Does anyone have any gouge on this position in this district?

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  • jdg0044
    replied
    One major difference is that they do the BI after you are hired.

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  • PSOSAC
    replied
    It is the same background as most other agencies. The exception to this is, of course, the FBI.

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  • Munevo89
    replied
    Ok I hope to have a few years experience and earn my masters then apply in the future. I was just curious how is the Background investigation compared to other agencies? I have excellent credit never been arrested in my life just a few speeding tickets from 5+ years ago.. currently have zero points on my license.

    Forgot to mention does certificates help out during hiring process? I have earned the following:

    Private Investigation, Forensic Accounting and Forensic Psychology.
    Last edited by Munevo89; 10-16-2014, 03:32 PM.

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  • bayranger
    replied
    Originally posted by Munevo89 View Post
    Guys does a Graduate degree help for a Federal Probation officer? I have a BS in Criminal Justice and one year away from earning my MSBA- Master of science business administration. I am hoping to start out as a probation officer at my local court. It is a part time position (14 hours a week) I am currently still a full time student..
    Can't imagine an advanced degree hurting anything for sure. Worst case if you are up against another applicant of equal experience then your your Masters will put you ahead of them. Masters degree always helps when competing.

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  • Munevo89
    replied
    Guys does a Graduate degree help for a Federal Probation officer? I have a BS in Criminal Justice and one year away from earning my MSBA- Master of science business administration. I am hoping to start out as a probation officer at my local court. It is a part time position (14 hours a week) I am currently still a full time student..

    Leave a comment:

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