Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

US Probation Officer

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • satxparoleofcr
    replied
    Originally posted by tx0811 View Post
    I was just wondering what the typical day for a United States Pre-Trial Services Officer consists of? I know they investigate releasing defendant's on bail, past criminal history, risk to community, etc. I am just curious if they are out in the field a lot or primary spend their time at the Courthouse and jails.
    Originally posted by dsb05c View Post
    The ones here are split between those that do mostly bail reports and those that do mostly supervision. The bail report people have a small caseload I believe of pretty low risk bond cases and the supervision folks have to be available at any time to come in and help right bail reports if they can slammed a bunch of new arrests. Bail reports are very quick backgrounds with very little turnaround and not much ability to verify information.
    Originally posted by PSOSAC View Post
    My District is totally opposite as we are not bifurcated. I do bail investigations (which are surprisingly detailed with substantiated info and are completed in a matyer of hours) as well as supervision to include electronic monitoring cases. Typically in the field weekly.

    Sorry for the mistakes - fat fingers...

    In my district, we have tight time-frames. Sometimes you have under an hour to interview the person, type the bail report and type out all the prior record, rushing to court to get the reports distributed. In some circumstances, you don't have time to verify much but if given enough time by the court, you are able to do much more. Some districts have the Initial Appearance and Detention Hearing on the same day and other places have the IA on one day, then have the Detention Hearing three days later so the PSO has much more time to have a nice looking report. Field time varies on job assignment but it ranges from 1-3 days per month and that's it, which is definitely not enough field time to manage a large caseload to include LMP cases. If you are PTS, you have to be ready to drop what you're doing at a moments notice to jump in and handle new arrests, since that is the top priority.

    Leave a comment:


  • dsb05c
    replied
    True, I will say that I haven't worked In pretrial so only what I have heard some say during trainings or in passing at court. The unverifiable cases are usually illegal immigrants or the go fast boat cases as well as semi submersibles. Those are tough to verify in a few hours but yes, PSO do verify what they can for the judges to determine flight risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • PSOSAC
    replied
    Originally posted by dsb05c View Post
    The ones here are split between those that do mostly bail reports and those that do mostly supervision. The bail report people have a small caseload I believe of pretty low risk bond cases and the supervision folks have to be available at any time to come in and help right bail reports if they can slammed a bunch of new arrests. Bail reports are very quick backgrounds with very little turnaround and not much ability to verify information.
    My District is totally opposite as we are not bifurcated. I do bail investigations (which are surprisingly detailed with substantiated info and are completed in a matyer of hours) as well as supervision to include electronic monitoring cases. Typically in the field weekly.

    Sorry for the mistakes - fat fingers...

    Leave a comment:


  • dsb05c
    replied
    The ones here are split between those that do mostly bail reports and those that do mostly supervision. The bail report people have a small caseload I believe of pretty low risk bond cases and the supervision folks have to be available at any time to come in and help right bail reports if they can slammed a bunch of new arrests. Bail reports are very quick backgrounds with very little turnaround and not much ability to verify information.

    Leave a comment:


  • tx0811
    replied
    I was just wondering what the typical day for a United States Pre-Trial Services Officer consists of? I know they investigate releasing defendant's on bail, past criminal history, risk to community, etc. I am just curious if they are out in the field a lot or primary spend their time at the Courthouse and jails.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdg0044
    replied
    Originally posted by Viking14 View Post
    I have an interview in April, HR said there would be a written portion, a scenario and a panel interview.
    Anyone know what scenario means? Like a video or a real life practical?
    Probably just a written scenario, and you will have to say or write what you would do in that situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Viking14
    replied
    I have an interview in April, HR said there would be a written portion, a scenario and a panel interview.
    Anyone know what scenario means? Like a video or a real life practical?

    Leave a comment:


  • PSOSAC
    replied
    Originally posted by Nixon35 View Post
    Can someone also maybe give any insight on how promotions work. By that I mean does it go Probation officer, Probation supervisor, assistant deputy chief,etc?

    Also has anyone in the hiring process for the Massachusetts districts heard anything back yet?

    Thanks!
    As we all keep saying, It depends on the District... Typically its officer, specialists such as Drug and Alcohol Specialist (DATS)/Location Monitoring Specialist/program Specialist, supervising officers, deputy chief, chief.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nixon35
    replied
    Can someone also maybe give any insight on how promotions work. By that I mean does it go Probation officer, Probation supervisor, assistant deputy chief,etc?

    Also has anyone in the hiring process for the Massachusetts districts heard anything back yet?

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • dsb05c
    replied
    We used to have a MH officers, DATS officers, and ISS (really bad guys and witsec) cases. They changed and now just call specialist officers. Our contact standards are PCRA driven. LOW cases should be on admin supervision with our POA, high cases at least once per month, moderates every other month and low/moderates quarterly. Of course, it depends on what is going on with cases. There isn't a set standard of each visit but by home contact but they strongly encourage contests should be in the community and office not used to meet that contact standard. Also have monthly treatment collateral contacts and location monitoring monthly contacts with collateral contacts with those. Sex offenders do have set standards and are a pain in the butt to supervise

    Leave a comment:


  • jdg0044
    replied
    Originally posted by MiamiCanes View Post
    Can being bilingual meet the guidelines for " specialized officer?"
    No, specialized officers are specific positions that must be applied for. They are competitive, an in my district, you must have 3 years experience with at least one year at the CL-28 pay level.

    Leave a comment:


  • MiamiCanes
    replied
    Originally posted by holycrikey View Post
    Contact standards are still fairly new. Generally though, we only have contact standards for two categories: High and Moderate. High risk are to be seen at least 2x month, Moderate are to be seen 1x month. Some Highs I see once a week because they have a ton of issues. Some Moderates I see 2x a month because they too need a little bit more than the standard. Low/Moderate is the next level and is an "as needed" category and is based totally on your discretion. If you can justify why you don't need to frequently see these people, you're golden. I have some Low/Mods I see every one/two/three months because they have some current issues that need addressing. Others I haven't seen in six or more months because they've been doing well. In my experience with the feds, everything is
    based on justification. If you can justify why you haven't seen a guy for 8/9/10 months, it's totally fine. Again, I speak only for my district. Also, there is no standard on whether you see them at home or in the office. To my knowledge, I don't think any district in the US has a certain requirement on x number of office visits versus home visits. I like the field, so I try to spend more time there. Lots of discretion.

    Geography is going to vary massively from district to district. In my district, we used share our city cases, as that was where most of them lived. On top of that, we were assigned one external county that was specifically yours. Recently we changed to where they want us to not be bound by geography. I now have offenders in the city as well as three or four surrounding counties. Makes days longer, but it's good to develop contacts in other counties. Some districts will tie you to a specific county, some will spread you out. Impossible to say how things are run in your neck of the woods.

    Most districts have specialized caseloads. Sex offender caseloads are common. I'm a semi-specialized sex offender officer (50% of my caseload sex offenders and I am the only sex offender officer in my office) so feel free to ask questions if you'd like. Some districts have specialized caseloads with just financial crimes or gangs or violent offenders or computer crimes. Depends on if your district has a ton of those cases and can make an entire caseload out of it. Specialized caseloads are different from being an actual specialist officer. A specialist officer is a totally different pay band and the job must fall in the Adminstrative Office guidelines for a "specialized" officer. So even though I supervise sex offenders, I'm not officially a specialized officer. Weird, but this can vary district to district as well.

    Can being bilingual meet the guidelines for " specialized officer?"

    Leave a comment:


  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by Go Banana View Post
    I had some questions about workload. Somewhere near the beginning some current USPO's said they had about 50-70 cases. How often are you expected to meet with your offenders? Most of my current caseload I see weekly, some more often, some less. Are you doing monthly home visits on everyone? How big of a geographical area are you spread over? Do you generally have specialized caseloads?
    Contact standards are still fairly new. Generally though, we only have contact standards for two categories: High and Moderate. High risk are to be seen at least 2x month, Moderate are to be seen 1x month. Some Highs I see once a week because they have a ton of issues. Some Moderates I see 2x a month because they too need a little bit more than the standard. Low/Moderate is the next level and is an "as needed" category and is based totally on your discretion. If you can justify why you don't need to frequently see these people, you're golden. I have some Low/Mods I see every one/two/three months because they have some current issues that need addressing. Others I haven't seen in six or more months because they've been doing well. In my experience with the feds, everything is based on justification. If you can justify why you haven't seen a guy for 8/9/10 months, it's totally fine. Again, I speak only for my district. Also, there is no standard on whether you see them at home or in the office. To my knowledge, I don't think any district in the US has a certain requirement on x number of office visits versus home visits. I like the field, so I try to spend more time there. Lots of discretion.

    Geography is going to vary massively from district to district. In my district, we used share our city cases, as that was where most of them lived. On top of that, we were assigned one external county that was specifically yours. Recently we changed to where they want us to not be bound by geography. I now have offenders in the city as well as three or four surrounding counties. Makes days longer, but it's good to develop contacts in other counties. Some districts will tie you to a specific county, some will spread you out. Impossible to say how things are run in your neck of the woods.

    Most districts have specialized caseloads. Sex offender caseloads are common. I'm a semi-specialized sex offender officer (50% of my caseload sex offenders and I am the only sex offender officer in my office) so feel free to ask questions if you'd like. Some districts have specialized caseloads with just financial crimes or gangs or violent offenders or computer crimes. Depends on if your district has a ton of those cases and can make an entire caseload out of it. Specialized caseloads are different from being an actual specialist officer. A specialist officer is a totally different pay band and the job must fall in the Adminstrative Office guidelines for a "specialized" officer. So even though I supervise sex offenders, I'm not officially a specialized officer. Weird, but this can vary district to district as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • MiamiCanes
    replied
    Also, brush up on evidence-based practices.

    Leave a comment:


  • Go Banana
    replied
    I had some questions about workload. Somewhere near the beginning some current USPO's said they had about 50-70 cases. How often are you expected to meet with your offenders? Most of my current caseload I see weekly, some more often, some less. Are you doing monthly home visits on everyone? How big of a geographical area are you spread over? Do you generally have specialized caseloads?

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 3416 users online. 234 members and 3182 guests.

Most users ever online was 26,947 at 08:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X