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  • This is truly one of the best jobs in federal law enforcement. I look forward to going to work everyday!
    Last edited by LadyKiller; 09-03-2016, 01:58 AM.

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    • Originally posted by LadyKiller View Post
      This is truly one of the best jobs in federal law enforcement. I look forward to going to work everyday!
      Glad that you are happy, but the job satisfaction level really depends on your district in my opinion.
      I am hopeful for the day when all districts have comp time, telework, flex time, business casual clothing, flex time, and so on. The policies related to those items often greatly influence an officer's happiness with their job....and as stated before, not all districts have those things. Some districts have NONE of those.
      www.ShankAZombie.com

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      • I am looking at enrolling in a Master's program. There are two degrees I would want to get, either a MA is Criminology or a MA in Emergency Management, would one be better than the other? Any help is appreciated.

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        • Originally posted by 80srock View Post
          CJ I see your point, fortunately for me my experience has been very different as a USPO. I can honestly say I do more as a USPO to protect the public than I ever did generating revenue writing tickets lol.
          Are your PMs turned on, it won't allow me.

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          • Originally posted by Cubs4life View Post
            I am looking at enrolling in a Master's program. There are two degrees I would want to get, either a MA is Criminology or a MA in Emergency Management, would one be better than the other? Any help is appreciated.
            Man don't waste your money on a degree in either of those. Especially, CJ. Get something that is applicable to all kinds work, an MBA is your best bet. You don't have to have a CJ degree to get into this job. Most people in my district were getting masters because it was an unwritten rule that you had to have one in order to get promoted, which is f'ing ridiculous. They were getting easy masters degrees in educational leadership. They keep coming up with all these different kinds of degrees, I have never heard of emergency management before haha. However, a masters is not required to get hired for most districts from my experience. I only have a BA and I got hired on.

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            • Originally posted by brownj21 View Post
              Glad that you are happy, but the job satisfaction level really depends on your district in my opinion.
              I am hopeful for the day when all districts have comp time, telework, flex time, business casual clothing, flex time, and so on. The policies related to those items often greatly influence an officer's happiness with their job....and as stated before, not all districts have those things. Some districts have NONE of those.
              Amen brother. I am happy to report that I am in a district that has telework, possible changes to the dress code, flex time in the field, and comp time. I got lucky. Some districts I have heard nightmares.

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              • anyone from the central district of california?

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                • Originally posted by Nola504 View Post
                  Man don't waste your money on a degree in either of those. Especially, CJ. Get something that is applicable to all kinds work, an MBA is your best bet. You don't have to have a CJ degree to get into this job. Most people in my district were getting masters because it was an unwritten rule that you had to have one in order to get promoted, which is f'ing ridiculous. They were getting easy masters degrees in educational leadership. They keep coming up with all these different kinds of degrees, I have never heard of emergency management before haha. However, a masters is not required to get hired for most districts from my experience. I only have a BA and I got hired on.
                  Agree, a master's degree might be an unwritten rule (research the district); however, having experience under your belt is the name of the game! An MBA will make you stand out because many already have CJ degrees; however, if business is not your thing I would choose an MS in Criminology vs Criminal Justice.

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                  • US Probation Officer

                    Originally posted by CJ511 View Post
                    This term "law enforcement" gets thrown around way too much when talking about probation. So much so that it eventually irritates me.

                    Let me break it down for everyone very simply, probation is it's own field. Law Enforcement is it's own field. The folks in law enforcement arrested the individual for breaking the "law". Therefore, they "enforced" the "law" and made an arrest. The person was afforded due process and had their day in court and was either found or pled guilty. At that point, "probation" may have stepped in to assist with a pre-sentence investigation. Otherwise, "probation" waited for the judge to impose a term of supervision which is within their line of work. While under supervision, the "probation officer" enforces rules, regulations, and conditions of the judge's sentence. That's what "probation officers" do, they enforce conditions of the sentence, in addition to pre-sentence investigations.

                    And let me be clear on the pre-sentence investigations, they are not criminal investigations. They are background investigations on steroids. There's a lot of research and application of sentencing guidelines. That's the reasone why those with law degrees are so highly sought these days, they are great at guideline application.

                    I don't care if handcuffs are issued, nor do I care about badges, and batons, and Tasers and so forth. Still doesn't qualify anyone as a "law enforcement" officer. They are just tools used for self-defense, not to protect the safety or life of the public, which is what "law enforcement" officers do every second that they are on duty.

                    So everyone stop with the same discussion about which districts are more LE oriented versus social work oriented. The dialogue doesn't make sense. Probation's main goal is to reduce recidivism. It's to change the way someone behaves. Again, it is it's own field with it's own mission. And before decides to copy and paste a definition of a USPO job vacancy announcement that reads "this is a judicial law-enforcement position", let me save you the time and energy. The districts write it up that way because it's a hazardous duty position and it has to be worded that way for retirement benefit purposes.

                    I worked in probation for more than a decade at a county level, then went on to parole at the state level. The two are very different, yet they are very similar. The main mission is still to change the behavior of the subject. Areas of state parole are very different in that it is more hands on with regards to arrests, surveillance, and where and how parolees are placed in violation facilities.

                    I've been with parole for a little over ten years. I've worked on the US Marshals Fugitive Task Force in addition to working with "law enforcement"'officials at every level. I've assisted them while they conducting in-depth investigations, which is a part of their "law enforcement" mission. I was not enforcing any local, state, or federal statutes. During other hours of the work day, I've performed motivational interviewing techniques. Never once did I consider myself a "law enforcement" officer.

                    So EVERYONE, stop with this back and forth talk about LE vs. social work.

                    USPO is the only law enforcement arm of the Federal Judiciary. Does that mean we are police officers or should act like one? No. We are a law enforcement agency with a specific mission. I think once one fully understand and accepts USPOs mission, then this LE Vs Social thing might be put to rest. The funny thing is this distinction is meaningless, the defendant/client/bad guy (whatever name they give them) don't sit there and examine USPOs credentials; we're known to many of them as the "Feds" (again meaningless). Prior to coming to USPOs, I flashed my Fed creds and didn't have to go into how much Leo I am or not, they complied (or did not, lol). The fed have many agencies that are designated as Leos and do nothing but push paper or watch paint dry.

                    I agree with most of your statement. However, don't entirely agree with the part about Pre Sentence not conducting criminal investigation(s), it depends on the district. Will we agree to disagree? Wouldn't doubt it; however, nothing is absolute within the world of USPO, especially since districts operate differently. Nevertheless I agree that at the end of the day, this job is what it is, PROBATION (Pre-trial, Pre Sentence investigations, and/or supervision).

                    Few observations made while on board with USPO, you have some USPOs that are frustrated with their hands being tied, tired of the red tapes, politics, etc. Therefore, they want a more LE oriented district, which I see no problem with, if that's their thing, and as long as they stay focus on the mission. Then you have those who get on board with USPO and want to do the "run and gun" thing, uh, wrong profession. You even have those who take "Federal" officer to the head, then make this job what it's not. Last we have USPOs who like this job, understand what it is and do it well. I tried explaining this job to family and friends and just got many blank stares in return, I have no problem with that; as long as I get to serve my country and/or the public at whatever capacity, I don't really care what one calls me or what my title is. It's a great job nonetheless, stay safe!
                    Last edited by HMCN; 09-04-2016, 02:16 PM.

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                    • Does anyone know if I must wait to re-apply a certain amount of time if I am denied a position? Does the wait apply to any federal PO agency or just that agency?

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                      • HMCN, I agree with everything you stated. You are one of the few that gets it. The best part of your statement is how you described your interaction with family/friends when attempting to break down the day-to-day duties of a probation officer. That's hysterical because I have the same reaction from everyone everytime I try to explain what I do.

                        And let me be clear here, maybe my post wasn't worded correctly in some areas, the job of probation/parole officers is critical. I, like you and all of of counterparts, have done more for society in one year than some people do in their entire career. I love what I do, but at the same time I understand what I do and what my role is. The same goes for you, you figured out what your mission is. People going into this field have to do some research. A simple search on the internet can provide a wealth of information. And sadly, people already in the field may have to do the same thing because many are confused. Or maybe they should simply pay attention in their trainings.

                        I'll add one more thing which will probably get your blood boiling, but only because you agree with me. I feel that the finacial compensation which POs receive, at every level of government, is absurd. The amount of work and responsiblity is incredible. Now I know that USPOs have the potential do make decent money, but in my opinion the top salary for a line officer doesn't match the workload. In speaking a few USPOs who were hired within the last ten years, they tell me that they were in the developmental phase for more than 5 years, not what they expected at all. They were making around 70k by year 6 or 7. Then when I talk with some of the 1811 guys/gals, they say they were making 120k after year 4. I'm in no way downplaying the tasks of 1811s, but you're talking about a substantial difference in compensation there. Of course money isn't everything, but again, when you are responsible for a significant number of people and run the risk of making the news if anyone of them slips up, the money should be equal.

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                        • Originally posted by Cubs4life View Post
                          Does anyone know if I must wait to re-apply a certain amount of time if I am denied a position? Does the wait apply to any federal PO agency or just that agency?
                          Anyone?

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                          • @cubs4life, never give up. Apply again and again.


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                            • Originally posted by Cubs4life View Post
                              Anyone?
                              I don't see why you should wait nor am I aware of anything permitting you from re-applying.
                              I know several people in our district applied at multiple districts and some even had interviews in multiple districts in a short period of time before being ultimately hired.
                              www.ShankAZombie.com

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                              • Originally posted by CJ511 View Post
                                In speaking a few USPOs who were hired within the last ten years, they tell me that they were in the developmental phase for more than 5 years, not what they expected at all. They were making around 70k by year 6 or 7. Then when I talk with some of the 1811 guys/gals, they say they were making 120k after year 4. I'm in no way downplaying the tasks of 1811s, but you're talking about a substantial difference in compensation there. Of course money isn't everything, but again, when you are responsible for a significant number of people and run the risk of making the news if anyone of them slips up, the money should be equal.
                                Yep, it is a big difference, 1811s receive LEAP on top of their regular pay. All the reason for folks to research the district they are applying to, some districts only keep you in the developmental stage for two years.

                                On another note, I knew an 1811 who wanted a USPO spot. The trade off? A happy spouse, attending soccer games and pageants.

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