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  • LadyKiller
    replied
    Originally posted by holycrikey View Post
    The assistant PO spots vary from district to district just like everything else. Some are allowed a bit more duties than in other districts. I'll speak for my district in that our assistants are purely clerical, although they now do maintain a low intensity caseload. Don't get me wrong, our assistants absolutely make the world go round by doing all the necessary footwork of prepping case files, tracking down documents needed, assisting in travel prep and training, etc. Lots of work, but there is no field work other than running down needed files at state/county court houses and such. Technically, they can go in the field with us, given that our use of force policy covers probation assistants. Not sure if many districts actually have assistants in the field unless they're prepping them to move onto a regular USPO position. Good gig though, excellent way to get in the door and prep for a USPO position. Decent pay, all things considered.
    Anyone know what scope of background investigation is done for probation officers? Is it secret, top secret? 7 years, 10 years? full-filed type investigation?

    Leave a comment:


  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by LadyKiller View Post
    anyone know anything about the assistant probation spot? good gig? Whats the process for getting hired?
    The assistant PO spots vary from district to district just like everything else. Some are allowed a bit more duties than in other districts. I'll speak for my district in that our assistants are purely clerical, although they now do maintain a low intensity caseload. Don't get me wrong, our assistants absolutely make the world go round by doing all the necessary footwork of prepping case files, tracking down documents needed, assisting in travel prep and training, etc. Lots of work, but there is no field work other than running down needed files at state/county court houses and such. Technically, they can go in the field with us, given that our use of force policy covers probation assistants. Not sure if many districts actually have assistants in the field unless they're prepping them to move onto a regular USPO position. Good gig though, excellent way to get in the door and prep for a USPO position. Decent pay, all things considered.

    Leave a comment:


  • CJ511
    replied
    Originally posted by LadyKiller View Post
    anyone know anything about the assistant probation spot? good gig? Whats the process for getting hired?
    It's definitely a good way to get your foot in the door with US Probation. I know a woman who started as an assistant, later became a USPO, then a specialist, and is now a SUSPO. Now, it just so happened that in the district where she works, they are willing to hire assistant POs as USPOs. Not sure how other districts consider such an applicant.

    The USPO job is a good one, so whatever you can do to make yourself more marketable to get the job, do it. I deal with them very often and besides the normal complaints that go along with any job, they all tell me time and again how much they like their job. There is a lot of work that goes with it but the job satisfaction is evident.

    Leave a comment:


  • nevergiveup725
    replied
    Ladykiller, send me a PM


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • LadyKiller
    replied
    Originally posted by nevergiveup725 View Post
    No


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    anyone know anything about the assistant probation spot? good gig? Whats the process for getting hired?

    Leave a comment:


  • nevergiveup725
    replied
    No


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • Diddy41
    replied
    Maybe I'm missing it, but is there a way for new listings to be e-mailed to me from the site; http://www.uscourts.gov/careers

    Instead of checking it once a week.

    Leave a comment:


  • JD2Fed
    replied
    Originally posted by PSOSAC View Post
    Oddly enough, considering what info you've provided, it doesn't appear you'd meet the minimum qualifications because, "A minimum of two years of progressively responsible casework experience in the investigation or supervision of offenders as a probation, parole or pre-trial services officer is required."

    HOWEVER, given your J.D., I'd bet more the a few chiefs would give you a shot at an interview. Just my .02 cents. Good luck.
    I'd have to agree with this. I am a current USPO and I was hired on fresh out of law school with no significant probation/parole/court services experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • satxparoleofcr
    replied
    Originally posted by dsb05c View Post
    It depends on the district that you are going to. Some smaller districts do everything ie. Bond Reports, Pretrial supervision, Presentence Reports, and Post Conviction Supervision. Some districts are split (like mine) and Pretrial only deals with that. Pretrial supervision is focused on maintaining compliance with courts bond order and making sure they show up to court. Some have pre-trial diversion for low risk cases. Post Conviction supervision is longer terms of supervision and more in depth. We don't just make sure they don't violate that J&C. We try to implement change. Pretrial has a different mission that post conviction and I didn't really realize it until I went to FLETC and spoke with pretrial officers.

    PTS is a different animal, especially if you're in a district that isn't combined, such as mine. I know folks that do PTS in combined districts and they supervise their pretrial cases like post-conviction cases. dsb05c is correct that PTS has a different mission than probation and that is largely based on the fact that our cases are still cloaked in the presumption of innocence. In PTS, you will write bail reports which can be very repetitious if that's all you do. PTS supervision is not as involved as post-conviction supervision and the push for evidenced based practices, but we do have location monitoring and sex offenders as well, and those can be challenging and time consuming. The district you're applying for is combined so the culture of PTS really depends on what district you work for. My opinion is that most don't really understand PTS but it is important and very fast paced, compared to post-conviction officers that can plan out a day and usually stick to their agenda. Good luck with the process and keep us updated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Achyuta
    replied
    Originally posted by dsb05c View Post
    It depends on the district that you are going to. Some smaller districts do everything ie. Bond Reports, Pretrial supervision, Presentence Reports, and Post Conviction Supervision. Some districts are split (like mine) and Pretrial only deals with that. Pretrial supervision is focused on maintaining compliance with courts bond order and making sure they show up to court. Some have pre-trial diversion for low risk cases. Post Conviction supervision is longer terms of supervision and more in depth. We don't just make sure they don't violate that J&C. We try to implement change. Pretrial has a different mission that post conviction and I didn't really realize it until I went to FLETC and spoke with pretrial officers.
    Thanks for the input! I should have included the places I was looking to apply for since it seems each district does its own thing.

    I am looking at the eastern North Carolina district prefer Fayetteville, Wilmington, or Raleigh, but I would take Greenville, New Bern, or Jacksonville if the opportunity came along. Any specific info would be grand! Loving the job so far on the state side. I just want the Federal pay bump and too contribute to my TSP again, it has just been sitting since I left the Military sadly.

    Leave a comment:


  • dsb05c
    replied
    It depends on the district that you are going to. Some smaller districts do everything ie. Bond Reports, Pretrial supervision, Presentence Reports, and Post Conviction Supervision. Some districts are split (like mine) and Pretrial only deals with that. Pretrial supervision is focused on maintaining compliance with courts bond order and making sure they show up to court. Some have pre-trial diversion for low risk cases. Post Conviction supervision is longer terms of supervision and more in depth. We don't just make sure they don't violate that J&C. We try to implement change. Pretrial has a different mission that post conviction and I didn't really realize it until I went to FLETC and spoke with pretrial officers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Achyuta
    replied
    Hey guys, I'm currently a state Probation/Parole Officer looking to go federal asap!

    I was wondering if you guys could offer some insight on Pre-trial Officer vs Probation Officer. I have been reading the U.S. Courts website and looking at the jobs. I know what the print says, but perhaps holycrikey, satxparoleofcr, or someone else working on the federal level could shed some light on the extra duties/down sides of each job the posting does not list.

    I'm trying to decide which way to go: Stay with direct supervision of offenders or try Pre-trial.

    Leave a comment:


  • satxparoleofcr
    replied
    Originally posted by holycrikey View Post
    As with everything in federal probation, districts do their own thing all the time. We should probably have a sticky on the first page of this thread that says, "We probably can't answer your question. 94 districts doing things however they want to" haha.
    Thank you!! I've been getting a steady stream of PMs with questions about hiring practices in various districts, what's on an applicant exam, and how long is the hiring process. 99% of the time, I can't answer the question, except in a very general manner, since I have no clue how other places hire. My hiring process was completely different for folks that came in after me. There's no standard across the country and even within our own judicial districts. I agree with PSOSAC and Crikey that the potential applicant with a J.D. should definitely apply. I went to FLETC with a gal who has a law degree and got hired on with no prior probation/parole experience. Give it a shot and you never know, you can't win if you don't play.

    Leave a comment:


  • holycrikey
    replied
    Originally posted by PSOSAC View Post
    Oddly enough, considering what info you've provided, it doesn't appear you'd meet the minimum qualifications because, "A minimum of two years of progressively responsible casework experience in the investigation or supervision of offenders as a probation, parole or pre-trial services officer is required."

    HOWEVER, given your J.D., I'd bet more the a few chiefs would give you a shot at an interview. Just my .02 cents. Good luck.
    I agree. Although, I'll say that my district just hired two people with no previous probation/caseload experience. I think the "minimum 2 year" statement can be pretty flexible district to district. Especially if the district is bifurcated, with court services/pre-trial being separate from supervision. My district appears willing to hire individuals with no probation/supervision/caseload experience if they're going into court services, as caseload experience there ins't as big of a deal as it would in a supervision role.

    As with everything in federal probation, districts do their own thing all the time. We should probably have a sticky on the first page of this thread that says, "We probably can't answer your question. 94 districts doing things however they want to" haha.

    Leave a comment:


  • PSOSAC
    replied
    Originally posted by ca_vet View Post
    Question regarding an application for Probation Officer. I am considering applying for a position; but after reading the announcement, I am not sure I qualify. I have six years in the military, B.A, M.S, and J.D, and legal work experience with a state agency. Thoughts?
    Oddly enough, considering what info you've provided, it doesn't appear you'd meet the minimum qualifications because, "A minimum of two years of progressively responsible casework experience in the investigation or supervision of offenders as a probation, parole or pre-trial services officer is required."

    HOWEVER, given your J.D., I'd bet more the a few chiefs would give you a shot at an interview. Just my .02 cents. Good luck.

    Leave a comment:

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