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  • The best way to find out how promotions/raises work is to have a contact in that district. I'm familiar with quite a few districts, and it is incredible how each districts functions compared to the next. If you have a contact in X district, have him/her call a PO/PSO in the district where you want to apply and find out that way. Otherwise, you won't find out until you start the job.

    If anyone has any questions about Probation and/or Pretrial Services, ask away or shoot me a private message.

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    • Just to put it out there, my start date is the 27th I found out on the 6th or 7th and it took 57 days for my medical to clear. In case anyone is wondering about wait times.

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      • Has anyone ever interviewed and taken an exam with the southern district of NY? If so then what are your thoughts on the process?

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        • Is the formal swearing ceremony as big a deal as HR is making it sound? I was planning on having my wife and parents come if it is, but otherwise probably just roll with it and go on with the day

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          • Originally posted by rtkCO View Post
            Is the formal swearing ceremony as big a deal as HR is making it sound? I was planning on having my wife and parents come if it is, but otherwise probably just roll with it and go on with the day
            Maybe I'm weird, but i thought it was a pretty big deal having an United States District Court Judge (they're pretty powerful/important people - youll find out soon enough) swear me in inside a their courtroom. Followed by them handing me my creds and my badges. Proud day for me and greatful my dad was able to be present.

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            • Originally posted by PSOSAC View Post
              Maybe I'm weird, but i thought it was a pretty big deal having an United States District Court Judge (they're pretty powerful/important people - youll find out soon enough) swear me in inside a their courtroom. Followed by them handing me my creds and my badges. Proud day for me and greatful my dad was able to be present.
              I agree, my wife, mother, and sister are all coming. I feel like it's a big day in my wife's and my life, and a big step for my career

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              • Originally posted by rtkCO View Post
                Is the formal swearing ceremony as big a deal as HR is making it sound? I was planning on having my wife and parents come if it is, but otherwise probably just roll with it and go on with the day
                I believe so. Some districts are a little more or less formal than others, but I felt it was a big day the way my district does it. I mean, the swear in ceremony is an officially docketed session of court just for you. That's pretty cool. And it's done by a judge that was appointed by the POTUS, so that's fairly cool too. If you happen to be sworn in by a judge that was appointed by a president you happen to like too, well that's pretty neat as well. My judge allowed my wife to hold the Bible while I was sworn in. Got to snag a few pictures with the judge afterwards as well. That probably only happens once in your career.

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                • In my district it was a Big deal in my district
                  Last edited by LadyKiller; 06-21-2016, 09:09 PM.

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                  • I have the same question about SDNY as I have been invited to test and I'm wondering just a bit about what it consists of. Anyone applied to SDNY & taken the test already able to offer any insight as to what to expect?
                    Last edited by Chineyeye ; 07-09-2016, 07:19 AM.

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                    • Chineyeye, PM me


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                      • Originally posted by brownj21 View Post
                        Unfortunately, once again....it depends on your district. I have heard of some districts giving enough steps to get their line officers to full performance (out of developmental range) in 2 years. Other districts, it's 6 to 7 years, unless you receive multiple "exceeds" on your evaluations.
                        It's crazy and potentially very frustrating how differently districts can be with pay, policy, progression and so on. Ask ask ask as many questions as you can think of before signing up. Seriously... Ask!
                        Ask about comp time, Telework, flex time, take home cars, dress code, firearms policies, and so on. All of those things I named above and much more varies from district to district.
                        This really should be the sticky of this entire thread.

                        You'll get new officers that head down to FLETC and realize other officers are earning more in different districts. The gut reaction is to freak out and feel injustice. There can be a lot of "the grass is greener" in this agency. But it's HUGE to remember a few things that brownj21 said above. To chime in, officers might be paid more in another district simply because that district has much higher caseload numbers or higher risk offenders, and decide to hire less officers to carry more of a load. Therefore they are paid more. Sometimes the stress from this type of caseload isn't worth the extra money. Sometimes the district is just a bit more flush with cash to progress their officers. Sometimes a district might pay lower but have SIGNIFICANTLY better culture or "fringe" benefits such as what brownj21 listed above (much more relaxed telework, dress code, etc). I will say that I personally know officers that make significantly more than me (with similar experience) but have a junk culture in their district or have a chief that isn't approachable, or supervisors that don't care about line officer concerns. Officers who are in the hiring process need to do their best research to check out the culture in the district as much as possible and not freak out about money. I have yet to meet an officer who was doing state/county/local probation/parole/corrections work that was paid more or had a better career track PRIOR to moving federal.

                        Realize you might not be paid as well as a neighboring district, but this could be for a variety of reasons, some of which are very easily justified.

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                        • District 1: Mercury
                          District 2: Venus
                          District 3: Earth
                          District 4: Mars
                          District 5: Jupiter

                          .... My FLETC IPPT class.

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                          • Hello,
                            I was contacted for an interview with the US probation office in Arizona. Is there anyone on here who works in Arizona as a US probation officer? I want to be fully prepared for my interview, since I know they are hard to obtain. I have close to five years experience working for the state and recently graduated with a masters in Criminal Justice. Any tips for my interview will help!

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                            • Hello, I've been reviewing this thread and noticed that you have answered a lot of questions regarding the USPO position, are there any tips that you can provide me with for the interview? I get super nervous while interviewing. May 2016, I had an interview with US Pretrial Officer position and I blew the interview, I was nervous and did not do well. I want to be prepared for this interview but haven't interviewed for any job for over 6 years now, I don't want to mess up this opportunity since working for the government has been my goal for awhile now. Thank you.

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                              • Originally posted by satxparoleofcr View Post
                                From my understanding, there is an unwritten rule that a new officer will spend 3-5 years at their first district before applying for a position in another district. I did not have to sign an agreement to stay for a certain amount of time, but I have seen others that have been required to sign agreements ranging from 3-5 years. My district has had a few that have left for a USPO/USPSO position elsewhere before their one year anniversary. From what I'm aware of, don't be expecting your management to support you leaving, even if it is to get closer to home. Once you let them know you're looking to move, get an umbrella and wait for the shart storm to commence.


                                Hello, I've been reviewing this thread and noticed that you have answered a lot of questions regarding the USPO position, are there any tips that you can provide me with for the interview? I get super nervous while interviewing. May 2016, I had an interview with US Pretrial Officer position and I blew the interview, I was nervous and did not do well. I want to be prepared for this interview but haven't interviewed for any job for over 6 years now, I don't want to mess up this opportunity since working for the government has been my goal for awhile now. Thank you.

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