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  • COPO85
    commented on 's reply
    I feel like some on this thread have said the Southern District of CA is not great. Maybe I'm wrong?

  • ecg14
    replied
    I have been considering applying to the San Diego office for quite some time now and would be moving across the country, which is not an issue for me. Does this office consider out of state candidates? I have five years experience in probation at the state level and experience managing specialized cases. I am not really worried about the high caseload issue everyone talks about due to the fact that my numbers are astronomical now. If anyone could shed a little more light on why there is so much turnover there I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • holycrikey
    replied
    Hey guys,

    As a current USPO over the past 5+ years, I figured it might be a good time to make this comment. Probably 90% of posts are guys asking "what does XYZ district look for in a candidate?" Although I fully agree that some districts can look like polar opposites, I would feel confident saying that 99% of districts want the following in a supervision officer (I can't really speak for the other side of the coin, presentence/pretrial officers)...

    1.) Some/any history of caseload management, regardless of field.
    2.) Involvement with "involuntary clients", whatever they may be (probation, corrections, treatment, etc)
    3.) Balanced personal philosophy (history of law enforcement coupled with some type of social work is almost universally seen as a good thing)
    4.) Willingness to be coached and adaptable to change.
    5.) Leadership qualities (all districts are self-sufficient and because of this, need line officers to step up to be firearms instructors, ORT/defensive tactics instructors, policy experts, etc etc).
    6.) Education (advanced degrees are almost universally liked, but absolutely not necessary).
    7.) Not an *******. Most districts are on the smaller scale, unless you're in the few large metro areas. A lot of districts want someone who jives with the other officers because most offices can be small so overbearing personalities can be a problem. Laid back but professional when it counts (court, interactions with probationers, etc) seems to be a universal likable quality.

    I feel like if you can present the above qualities, almost any district will find you as a desirable candidate. If you don't have those qualities? Look for ways to develop those qualities in your current job.

    This is just my advice from speaking with a variety of people across the country. Best of luck to all who come to this thread for advice. The fact that you're researching things is a good quality.

    Leave a comment:


  • OuttatheLBC
    commented on 's reply
    ATanaka mind if I PM you?

  • myman12
    replied
    Anyone works for NJ OR PA districts? Any info on what they are looking for in an applicant?

    Leave a comment:


  • HMCN
    commented on 's reply
    Middle and Southern Florida are busy districts. High caseloads....

  • Hoppyandiknowit
    replied
    Any current probation officer assistants out there ..more specifically in the southern district of New York. If so can you tell me what the job entails day-to-day, how often do you have to travel to different locations versus going into the office or those locations far away from your home office. Basically does the job require a lot of travel? Any insight would be much appreciated! Thank you in advance!!

    Leave a comment:


  • fedco95
    replied
    Curious as a current BOP employee, How does our background check cross over if any for a FED P/O gig. Waiting to hear on the schedule B for the marshals but I heard a few employees leave the BOP and said they love working as a P/O.

    Leave a comment:


  • COPO85
    replied
    Originally posted by mattydub View Post
    I did see the posting in San Diego, and figured they would have high caseloads. Are you able to have a say in the caseload you supervise or more just assign based on needs?

    Does anyone have input on the Las Vegas, El Paso, or Middle District of Florida? I see they have all openings and was curious to how they were with caseloads, office environment, hiring process, etc.
    I've applied for a few places and most said PSI Unit to start.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattydub
    replied
    I did see the posting in San Diego, and figured they would have high caseloads. Are you able to have a say in the caseload you supervise or more just assign based on needs?

    Does anyone have input on the Las Vegas, El Paso, or Middle District of Florida? I see they have all openings and was curious to how they were with caseloads, office environment, hiring process, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • HMCN
    commented on 's reply
    I have a D.C. contact. PM me if you still have questions.

  • LadyKiller
    commented on 's reply
    I filled out the SF86 prior to starting.

  • COPO85
    commented on 's reply
    Hey Lady, curious, how long after you started provisionally did you fill out the SF86?

  • Uptown1234
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for your feedback!

  • LadyKiller
    replied
    Originally posted by Uptown1234 View Post
    Hello all, any insight on the SF86/background investigation process or timeline for a new hire?
    It's a single scope background. They will talk to everyone, tell the truth. My background took right at two years. I was hired, and supervising a caseload prior to it being completed, that entire two years I was provisional/subject to being fired if something negative came back. New people in my office are currently having to wait 12+ months for their backgrounds to clear. The upside is with Probation you aren't subject to the adjudication standards that other agencies are. In other words, if you have something negative, the Chief Judge, and Probation Chief decide if you still get hired. There isn't someone in Washington checking boxes that doesn't know you making that decision. There are several people working in my office that have had serious background issues that are now fully credentialed federal law enforcement officers, because they were simply honest with the Chief about their past indiscretions. On a side note this means if you are denied by one district, you can still apply and be picked up by another, I see it all the time, it's literally up to the Chief. There are even felons working in support roles for U.S. Probation.

    Leave a comment:

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