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FBI special agent hiring question...

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  • #16
    On how candidates are rated, from a similar thread: http://forums.officer.com/t187054/

    It starts with the resume. The resume contributes to, significantly so, an applicant's points. And while most understand that the boxes checked contribute to earned points (educational points, veteran's points, etc), they do not understand that their articulation of their Basic Qualifications and Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) are scored as well, to include the deduction of points. Deductions!?! Yes, deductions. Maximize your chances of obtaining a high overall score by obtaining a copy of the full Vacancy Announcement, identifying the enumerated qualifications, and addressing them. Failing to do so equals losing points. How many? One here, five there, and before you begin, you are done.

    The testing. Yes, the test score is important, and folks who don't test well typically do not fare well. I recommend that applicants find out the format of the test they'll be taking and to study for it. Even college graduates. Even folks who tested well in high school. Failing to do so equals losing points from what I'll call your "potential score;" that being the score you'd likely earn if well prepared. How many? Again, one here, five there, while maybe not done, you won't make the cut. Duh, right? You'd think so, but if I've heard it once, I've heard it dozens of times from test takers that they wish that they had prepped more.

    The interview. It's usually scored, not pass or fail. There's a wealth of information available on the topic. Prep yourself. Failing to do so equals losing points from your "potential score," if scored, or failing outright in pass or fail situations. And for Pete's sake understand the grooming and dress standards of a professional environment. Note that the interviews are typically evaluated considering five areas which are scored from one to five. A successful applicant typically needs all fours and fives, certainly not more than one three.

    And for most positions and most people, that tally of those scores is who you are to the agencies considering you, or rather, to the agencies that you are considering.

    I might of missed something and there are likely exceptions, but that's the basics of it. I've not addressed things like psych evals, PT standards, etc. Most otherwise qualified applicants aren't weeded out by those anyway, imo. The PT test test/standards, you say? Then, wait for it... prep yourself by understanding the standard and being able to exceed, not meet it. And given that, no, the five or ten points veteran's points here, or the five or ten points academic points there, or any other points for that matter, are not impossible to overcome per se. Of course, your competition with those veteran's, academic, and additional points - to include certain amounts of time in grade for certain federal positions? Who understands how to write a public sector resume? Who tests and interviews well? Yeah, that applicant will be selected- and should be.

    Or something like that.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by UT_Newbie View Post
      Well said, thank you.
      You're welcome, good luck with whatever you decide. I'm sure you'll fare well since you were reasonable enough to seek advice on the matter.
      God never promised that it would be easy, just that he would be there with you every step of the way.

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      • #18
        Hi everyone, I figured this would be an appropriate thread for this question. My plan is to pursue federal LE upon graduation from college(May 2021), and I plan to apply with USCP at that time. I think USCP could be a great career or a potential stepping stone. My question pertaining to the FBI Special Agent position is this: Would work with USCP for a few to several years, along with work in a specialty unit(hopefully) make me a competitive candidate for an 1811 position with the FBI? My degree is in Construction Science and Management, which I understand is not the ideal degree like law, accounting, computer science, etc. There are several specialty units in USCP that interest me, but two that I think I would really enjoy are Dignitary Protection and Criminal Investigations. Would work with one of these units along with my degree at least put me in the running for an 1811 position with the FBI? Would these qualify under the law enforcement background for the application? Any insight would be great.
        Thanks!

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        • Gollywompas
          Gollywompas commented
          Editing a comment
          USCP would absoutley help, but I also wouldn't hold off on applying for the FBI, apply for both as soon as you can. Do good in school, if you have less than stellar grades, work hard to bring them up, be a good student, maybe join an honor society and look for a "Recent Graduate" announcement from the FBI.. you can usually apply to those 6 months from graduation and up to 2 years after graduation. The FBI is one of those agencies that looks fotr all types of people, they get plenty of Law Enforcment and Military applicants, I'm sure they dont see to many people with a background/ education in Construction Science; that may appeal to them, you won't know unless you give it a shot. Pursue as many LE jobs as you can but always shoot for the one you want.

        • hopefulfed36
          hopefulfed36 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the response Gollywompas . I was under the impression that you need 3 years of professional work experience before applying to the FBI. Maybe this is just for the agent position. Are you referring to other positions within the FBI? If so, what are those positions like and what are the chances are moving into an agent position down the road?

        • Gollywompas
          Gollywompas commented
          Editing a comment
          hopefulfed36 many people start their FBI careers as uniformed FBI Police officers or as Surveillance professionals, and transition to FBI SA's after three years. You wont get any special treatment when it comes to applying to be an SA, but you will probably know the agency better than anyone else applying and hopefully have your $hit together.
          Last edited by Gollywompas; 04-03-2019, 10:23 AM. Reason: Grammer

        • hopefulfed36
          hopefulfed36 commented
          Editing a comment
          It's great to here that some people make the transition over to SA after 3 years. I have been looking at some of the positions the FBI offers through the collegiate hiring initiative and I think these would be positions I would enjoy before applying to an agent position. Thanks again for the help Gollywompas

      • #19
        Originally posted by UT_Newbie View Post
        Hello,
        I have a few questions about the FBI special agent hiring qualifications, and I was hoping that some of you might have the answers, or could at least point me to someone who does.

        On the fbijobs dot gov website, it states that you must obtain a 4 year degree. (I have a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice with a minor in homeland security). It also states that you must have at least 3 years of professional work experience. (The work experience must be relevant to your area of expertise, i.e., you cannot work as a landscaper if you have a law degree etc.). I have a solid work history, but nothing directly related to criminal justice, or homeland security.

        I am in the position now where I can look for employment that would help me become more highly qualified for when I am able to apply for the SA position, but do not “need” a new job ASAP.
        I would be using the critical skill options of Military experience, and would like to use law enforcement or other investigative experience also. I have applied to two different jobs, and have been offered a position for both of them (crazy I know…). Both are local, and pay is not an issue, I now have to choose...

        Which of these two positions would best fit in the "law enforcement or other investigative experience" critical skill area, and also count towards my "at least three years of professional work experience".

        A Transportation Security Inspector-(aviation) for the TSA
        Or
        A Police officer in the Veterans Affairs Hospital?

        Obviously the TSI position is not law enforcement, and the VA Police is, BUT it states in the duties section of the TSI position that I would be “Conducting regulatory inspections/investigations and supports criminal investigations related to alleged or suspected security violations.” That might make it fit into the “Other investigative experience” part of the critical skill right?
        What are your thoughts?
        Which one should I choose?
        Or should I turn both down and wait for something that would fit better?
        I am turning 30 this year, and have no federal law enforcement experience, so I have a couple years to get in, but not long…

        Thanks in advance for any helpful info.
        Every now and then the bureau will post announcements targeting specifically mil or law enforcement. Keep an eye out for one of those mil announcements.

        Comment

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