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  • FBI special agent hiring question...

    Hello,
    I have a few questions about the FBI special agent hiring qualifications, and I was hoping that some of you might have the answers, or could at least point me to someone who does.

    On the fbijobs dot gov website, it states that you must obtain a 4 year degree. (I have a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice with a minor in homeland security). It also states that you must have at least 3 years of professional work experience. (The work experience must be relevant to your area of expertise, i.e., you cannot work as a landscaper if you have a law degree etc.). I have a solid work history, but nothing directly related to criminal justice, or homeland security.

    I am in the position now where I can look for employment that would help me become more highly qualified for when I am able to apply for the SA position, but do not “need” a new job ASAP.
    I would be using the critical skill options of Military experience, and would like to use law enforcement or other investigative experience also. I have applied to two different jobs, and have been offered a position for both of them (crazy I know…). Both are local, and pay is not an issue, I now have to choose...

    Which of these two positions would best fit in the "law enforcement or other investigative experience" critical skill area, and also count towards my "at least three years of professional work experience".

    A Transportation Security Inspector-(aviation) for the TSA
    Or
    A Police officer in the Veterans Affairs Hospital?

    Obviously the TSI position is not law enforcement, and the VA Police is, BUT it states in the duties section of the TSI position that I would be “Conducting regulatory inspections/investigations and supports criminal investigations related to alleged or suspected security violations.” That might make it fit into the “Other investigative experience” part of the critical skill right?
    What are your thoughts?
    Which one should I choose?
    Or should I turn both down and wait for something that would fit better?
    I am turning 30 this year, and have no federal law enforcement experience, so I have a couple years to get in, but not long…

    Thanks in advance for any helpful info.

  • #2
    I am a TSI for aviation and would gladly take your question. One of my job is to build civil penalty case against regulated airlines industry. We take various methods seen in law enforcement to incorporate our case such as: witness statement, surveillance footage, reviewing documentations, and conducting covert testing. At times we will respond to the incident that takes place in our airport that you will often see on the news. We will then make a civil case against that certain individual. We liason with a varity of agency, local and state. I also work pretty closely with our counsel, same to the extend as a special agent working with AUSA.

    TSI gig is hard to come by but is probably the best job in TSA. It got me prepared enough to ace some of the 1811 panel interviews i have attended. I can't speak for the VA Police but that position is like ours, no LEO coverage. So get the job that will prepared you well for your next career.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Roninjin View Post
      I am a TSI for aviation and would gladly take your question. One of my job is to build civil penalty case against regulated airlines industry. We take various methods seen in law enforcement to incorporate our case such as: witness statement, surveillance footage, reviewing documentations, and conducting covert testing. At times we will respond to the incident that takes place in our airport that you will often see on the news. We will then make a civil case against that certain individual. We liason with a varity of agency, local and state. I also work pretty closely with our counsel, same to the extend as a special agent working with AUSA.

      TSI gig is hard to come by but is probably the best job in TSA. It got me prepared enough to ace some of the 1811 panel interviews i have attended. I can't speak for the VA Police but that position is like ours, no LEO coverage. So get the job that will prepared you well for your next career.

      Thank you for your reply, it is always good to have an insiders view of things.

      Comment


      • #4
        Off of the FBI's website, Law Enforcement or Other Investigative Experience is defined as:

        "To qualify for the Law Enforcement Critical Skill, a candidate must have at least two years of full-time investigative experience in a law enforcement agency."

        That being the case, no, neither of the positions that you have tentative offers for will qualify.

        However, Diversified Experience is defined as:

        "To qualify for the Diversified Critical Skill, a candidate must have a BS or BA degree in any discipline, plus three years of full-time work experience, or an advanced degree accompanied by two years of full-time work experience. Please note: opportunities to qualify through the Diversified Critical Skill are very limited."

        This is your best bet. Both of the positions that you have tentative offers for will qualify, along with a host of others.

        Best of luck.

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        • #5
          I've said it before, and I'll say it again:

          A "good" candidate for most 1811 programs looks something like this: 28 years old, a Bachelor's Degree, a Superior Academic Achievement rating, and 5 years of professional/military/law enforcement experience. At least that. A Master's degree, language proficiency, a desirable skill set, ect contributes to a candidate's being competitive.

          Yes, some agencies fill a low percentage of new hires from an academic only pool. But relying on that is a low percentage proposition.

          Yes, some of the non-entry level requirements can and will be waived for "the right person." Relying on being that person is a low percentage proposition.

          And the more competitive agencies? Arguably the more prestigious ones from the perspective of the outsiders looking in, right or wrong? The more a candidate has to build their resumes beyond what I posted above.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Erik View Post
            I've said it before, and I'll say it again:

            A "good" candidate for most 1811 programs looks something like this: 28 years old, a Bachelor's Degree, a Superior Academic Achievement rating, and 5 years of professional/military/law enforcement experience. At least that. A Master's degree, language proficiency, a desirable skill set, ect contributes to a candidate's being competitive.

            Yes, some agencies fill a low percentage of new hires from an academic only pool. But relying on that is a low percentage proposition.

            Yes, some of the non-entry level requirements can and will be waived for "the right person." Relying on being that person is a low percentage proposition.

            And the more competitive agencies? Arguably the more prestigious ones from the perspective of the outsiders looking in, right or wrong? The more a candidate has to build their resumes beyond what I posted above.
            I agree with you Erik......the FBI has what they are looking for in the powerpoint slides located on the website for hiring Special Agents. If you want to be deemed "Most Competitive" then you need a bachelors degree in the computer field or have a decent amount of work experience in the computer. Though the degree in Criminal Justice/Homeland Security studies won't hurt you, it just won't make you a "Most Competitive" applicant.

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            • #7
              Thank you for all the replies, I appreciate the feedback

              Comment


              • #8
                By no means would being a VA police officer qualify as law enforcement investigative experience. Not a knock against Dept of VA police, but their officers are not criminal investigators. That role is handled by Dept of VA OIG special agents.
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  I've always been of the opinion that you should take a job with the intention of possibly retiring there. There's no guarantee that it will lead you in the direction that you'd like your career to go, and you may end up being miserable.

                  You'll at least be at this position for a year or two before you even apply for the FBI. After applying, it will probably be another couple of years before you are given a verdict from the FBI. Now if you don't get on with the FBI, that's 4-5 years spent with nothing to show for it.

                  All that being said, pick the position that you'll wake up and be happy to drive in to.
                  God never promised that it would be easy, just that he would be there with you every step of the way.

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                  • #10
                    One of my now Professor worked for the FBI, and she said that they had 85,000 applicants for a class of 50.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PoliceSeeker View Post
                      One of my now Professor worked for the FBI, and she said that they had 85,000 applicants for a class of 50.
                      Absolutely believable (though I believe it's probably more likely that 85k applied over the course of the entire year her NAT class occurred). FBI is the big fish in the federal pond that everyone and their uncle knows of. Hell, when I was graduating NCIS academy we were told over 10k applicants applied the year we were hired (just a couple hundred agents were hired that year total, I believe). Granted not everyone that applies to FBI is a competitive applicant, or even meets the minimum quals, but I've heard it said (and seen it myself from personal experience as a 1811) that getting hired as a 1811 (for FBI or other agencies) is comparable to being selected for admission to an Ivy League college as far as the number of qualified applicants in a given year compared to the actual numbers hired.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        The better known, and therefore more popular, agencies regularly tally hundreds and occasionally thousands of applicants per position available. The odds with the lesser known ones aren't necessarily any better given that they fewer available positions, by the way. Which is why it is so important to meet or exceed the minimum requirements, understand the process, in particular understand how candidates are rated, and then submit a resume written with that (the rating) in mind.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Erik View Post
                          understand how candidates are rated, and then submit a resume written with that (the rating) in mind.
                          This is very true to federal hiring in general. It took me two years of reading people say this, submitting apps, and not getting selected to realize that a "private sector style" resume does not work well with the government rating system. You really need to write much more about what your experiences are and quantify everything possible.

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                          • #14
                            I'm nearing an end to my long federal law enforcement career that I (and my bosses) would describe as highly successful. That being said, given the competition these days, I don't think that I'd be able to successfully compete for an 1811 job. The requirements back then were much less critical skill oriented, and a bachelor's in CJ with some police experience (and a bit of luck) was plenty good enough to get hired.

                            We live in a different world.

                            Fear not, another 1811 slot will open January 1, 2014.
                            They Don’t Think It Be Like It Is, But It Do.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by triniboy05 View Post
                              I've always been of the opinion that you should take a job with the intention of possibly retiring there. There's no guarantee that it will lead you in the direction that you'd like your career to go, and you may end up being miserable.

                              You'll at least be at this position for a year or two before you even apply for the FBI. After applying, it will probably be another couple of years before you are given a verdict from the FBI. Now if you don't get on with the FBI, that's 4-5 years spent with nothing to show for it.

                              All that being said, pick the position that you'll wake up and be happy to drive in to.
                              Well said, thank you.

                              Comment

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