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  • Bail Bonds

    I was watching the news the other night, and there was a story about being a Bail Bondsman. No, I do not want to be one, nor do I think it is sexy.

    I was just wondering if the Federal LE community looks unfavorably at this profession? Additionally, if somebody was a Bail Bondsman, would a Federal Background Investigator be likely to recommend the denial of a security clearance due to someone being a Bail Bondsman. From what I understand, these guys put up their houses as collateral, correct?

  • #2
    Prior to becoming a Deputy Sheriff, I worked extensively in the bail industry... It is what it is.

    There are widely varying roles depending on what state you're in. I worked in CA, which meant there was a whole ton of "grey area" to work in. Some states (like WA, UT) strictly control the recovery side of the business, while others (like OR, VI, DC) totally outlaw it. My experience was totally based out California, which has few provisions regarding how the skips are recovered, but many rules for the issuance of bonds.

    I personally never got into the insurance (bonding) side of the business, because that would probably turn it into a career. The recovery side is very hit and miss. Let's just put it this way: there are a ton of security guards who call themselves bounty hunters. And we all know that many of the security types are wannabees. There is room for professional bail recovery people who are knowledgeable and responsible, but those are the very rare exception, not the rule.

    I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.

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    • #3
      I don't think that it would be looked at as a plus or minus when it comes strictly to a hiring decision. 5 years in the Bail Bonds industry looks better than 5 different employees in 5 years. I think the trick is to not base an interview around your experience. For instance, saying that in my experience I have been able to use research in order to locate individuals who were difficult to find is a lot better than "I'm a Bounty Hunter baby and no one can get past me!". Also, just know that until you prove yourselves co workers may have a certain pre-conceived image.

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      • #4
        What StudChris says is exactly right. With interviews, as with many other things, it's all about articulation.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fanhood View Post
          I was watching the news the other night, and there was a story about being a Bail Bondsman. No, I do not want to be one, nor do I think it is sexy.

          I was just wondering if the Federal LE community looks unfavorably at this profession? Additionally, if somebody was a Bail Bondsman, would a Federal Background Investigator be likely to recommend the denial of a security clearance due to someone being a Bail Bondsman. From what I understand, these guys put up their houses as collateral, correct?
          I can speak to the background piece. Being a licensed bail bondsman is akin to selling any other type of insurance. Provided you had no issues with the licensing authority it would have no real bearing in the background adjudication process; thus no impediment to a security clearance.

          When a background investigation is conducted it seeks to identify both suitability and eligibility. There are various factors that come into play for both aspects; however a legitimate profession is not usually an issue that comes up. As noted, the bail bond industry is regulated and part of out modern day judicial system.

          Simply put, bail is just insurance that the accused will return to court at a later date. Bail Bonds have policies with various underwriters and are able to issue bonds under the policies therein. They pay a commission to the underwriter and keep a percentage of what the accused ponies up to get released. As for putting up their house or other collateral, that would be the person seeking the bond not the bondsman.

          As for how a Bail Bondsman is looked upon, again, they serve an integral part of the justice system. While some may personally object, it is what it is.
          Originally posted by SSD
          It has long been the tradition on this forum and as well as professionally not to second guess or Monday morning QB the officer's who were actually on-scene and had to make the decision. That being said, I don't think that your discussion will go very far on this board.
          Originally posted by Iowa #1603
          And now you are arguing about not arguing..................

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