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  • Executive Protection

    I know EP is not law enforcement but maybe someone on here has some experience working in EP or does it on the side and can answer some questions:

    Is it difficult to break into the field?

    Are the courses offered by schools such as Executive Protection Institute and Executive Secuirty International a good way to learn about EP or are the courses a waste of time?

    What is the best way to get a job working in EP?

  • #2
    People who do that type of work often have years of experience in law enforcement, military or both. Don't waste your money on some school.

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    • #3
      You do need some schooling to break into the field. The community is very tight knit. When I was with MPD, I was offered several times to do EP for some Saudi prince, and recently was asked to provide unarmed EP for an Indian princess (or their equivalent). In that industry, it is truly who you know. Military and LE weigh heavily, but EP schools are valued as well. It is not glamorous. Look at the resumes of those providing EP at the top, and emulate them. Although Mr. T was a thug (who made like 3k a day), there are very qualified people (ex SF and USSS types) in the field.

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      • #4
        Is it difficult to break into the field?
        Yes! As previously stated, most protective agents have years of law enforcement, military and private security who are well trained in protection work. It's mostly the word of mouth is how people end up gaining protection assigments.

        Are the courses offered by schools such as Executive Protection Institute and Executive Secuirty International a good way to learn about EP or are the courses a waste of time?
        I am not familiar with those schools, however, some protection schools are very much worth the cost. You have to learn somewhere. You should really do your homework on the school, and search for those who have attended it. Here in Maryland, R. L. Oatman (you can google the name for his info.) holds a protection class twice a year. From what I heard it's a really good class, and will put you to work if you successfully pass.


        What is the best way to get a job working in EP?
        By what you're doing now, simply asking around. Eventually you will come across someone who would be willing to talk to you about the business.

        Good luck!

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        • #5
          Understand that the majority of protection work is long and boring. I once had a friend tell me that the only exciting time was when they had not done their job correctly.

          While the line of work tends to favor LE types, it is important to understand that protection and policing are two entirely different animals. Granted, some of the skills you learn as a cop will be of use in protection, they are different working environments. In a protection environment, you main goal is to shield the principal from harm, while cops are focused on chasing down the bad guy.
          As a new entrant to the field, you would likely find yourself working a static post during the off-hours. This means standing about, hoping nothing happens. With experience and training, you could be doing advance work (checking sites, coordinating the visit, etc), driving the lead/chase car, working inside the bubble (close protection) and so on. I would strongly warn against accepting a gig until you are well versed in the industry, the various players and know how the job is done; lest you find yourself working with a bunch of screwballs who think they are protection specialists by virtue of watching a few movies and having an earpiece. I cant stress this point enough.

          For training, if you are able, look at attending one of the “name brand” schools or even one of the programs put on by FLETC. For FLETC, look at:
          http://www.fletc.gov/training/progra...-program-psotp

          Which is the main page for their Protective Services Operations Training Program. It is open to state and local cops; follow the link on this page to learn more.

          I would not be in a position to recommend any particular school, but with some time researching the numerous outfits, you will likely develop a feel for who are worth the time and money versus those who are simply a bodyguard diploma mill.
          Originally posted by SSD
          It has long been the tradition on this forum and as well as professionally not to second guess or Monday morning QB the officer's who were actually on-scene and had to make the decision. That being said, I don't think that your discussion will go very far on this board.
          Originally posted by Iowa #1603
          And now you are arguing about not arguing..................

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          • #6
            There are also levels of "Executive Protection." There's the level of expertise offered by retired USSS or DSS agents for very high target people (very wealthy or influential), and then there are some clients who are just looking for a guy with a gun to drive them around from place to place (common here in NYC involving retired NYPD and diamond merchants, for example).

            You're probably not going to get the high end protection gigs without employment experience in that field.
            They Don’t Think It Be Like It Is, But It Do.

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            • #7
              Having participated in several protective service operations (the gov't term for EP), I can honestly say if you want to see what the job is like, it's simple: put on your best suit and stand outside your bedroom window for 8 hours. If that excites you, then this may be the field you were made for.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kimble View Post
                Having participated in several protective service operations (the gov't term for EP), I can honestly say if you want to see what the job is like, it's simple: put on your best suit and stand outside your bedroom window for 8 hours. If that excites you, then this may be the field you were made for.
                That's funny....and pretty accurate.

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                • #9
                  Probably almost impossible to break into the field without extensive experience and/or knowing the right people. I agree with SHU, don't waste your time or money on a school--it's not going to do you any good.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kimble View Post
                    if you want to see what the job is like, it's simple: put on your best suit and stand outside your bedroom window for 8 hours.
                    Read that same phrase on another site.

                    The level of boredom varies greatly by the assignment.
                    They Don’t Think It Be Like It Is, But It Do.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GoldBadge View Post
                      The level of boredom varies greatly by the assignment.
                      True, and the level of enjoying the assignment varies greatly on who the principle is. I had much more fun being the limo driver to a principle (military service-level secretary) than I did sitting in a "chase" car on a static post with a USSS agent for several hours during a POTUS visit.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kimble View Post
                        True, and the level of enjoying the assignment varies greatly on who the principle is. I had much more fun being the limo driver to a principle (military service-level secretary) than I did sitting in a "chase" car on a static post with a USSS agent for several hours during a POTUS visit.
                        Location also plays into it. Who wants to work close protection in a disco (I know, Im dating myself) with 300+ drunks about while you try and keep an eye out for a bad guy/gal as the boss decides to try and slip away.

                        I will take the loading dock at 2am any day.
                        Originally posted by SSD
                        It has long been the tradition on this forum and as well as professionally not to second guess or Monday morning QB the officer's who were actually on-scene and had to make the decision. That being said, I don't think that your discussion will go very far on this board.
                        Originally posted by Iowa #1603
                        And now you are arguing about not arguing..................

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sgt jon View Post
                          Location also plays into it. Who wants to work close protection in a disco (I know, Im dating myself) with 300+ drunks about while you try and keep an eye out for a bad guy/gal as the boss decides to try and slip away.

                          I will take the loading dock at 2am any day.
                          The first time I ever worked a protection detail for the POTUS. I was so excited - the Big Show! I spent the 10 hour shift alternating posts between watching a dumpster crawling with rats in an alley and standing at elevator landings.

                          I helped pass the time by counting rats. I counted over 100 (of course I'm sure I counted some the same ones twice).

                          I was once assigned to a family member of a VP. That was one of my favorites.
                          They Don’t Think It Be Like It Is, But It Do.

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                          • #14
                            The enjoyable parts of protection are advance work and leadership positions. Nobody looks forward to suite-post.

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                            • #15
                              There are many private security companies that offer EP, but I have found very few that actually have you do that kind of work right out of the shoot. You have to pay your dues guarding dumpsters first. Even then, they look for LE experience and the EP may not be consistant work. I happened to fall in with a trainer for VIP/EP and got certified. Great training, and like it was said before, different than typical LE. I had a few gigs guarding some wealthy people, but again, like what was said before, the fun part comes way before the actual protection, which can be incredibly boring.

                              My advice would be to get some LE experience first. Let your PD or Sherriffs Office know you wouldn't mind doing some EP assignments if they come up. You might even get themn to pay for some training. Either way, you cant just get certified or get a degree and expect to have someone pay you to protect The Donald. It's a long road.

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