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  • Background Question

    I was hoping someone could help me with a background question I have. I just recently found out that my license was suspended because I had a failure to appear for a ticket I received in 2009. I never received the letter to appear in court and I called the courthouse two times to see if the ticket was submitted, but each time they said it was not. I foolishly assumed the officer was not going to submit the ticket because of what happened when he wrote me the ticket. Originally he said paced me going 60 in a 35, and I told him that was impossible because I knew I wasn't going that fast. He came back and told me that another officer paced me going 45, then he asked me how fast I thought I was going, because at that point, I don't think he really knew. Anyway, because of that I thought he wasn't going to submit it. Well I thought wrong. I realize that it is ultimately my responsibility and I have paid the ticket and have my license reinstated. What I would like to know now is how bad this is going to hurt me in my background investigation. Is this going to kill my chances in law enforcement? Your insight and opinions would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

  • #2
    as long as you disclose it/ put in on paper, not a problem IMO

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rs2010 View Post
      I was hoping someone could help me with a background question I have. I just recently found out that my license was suspended because I had a failure to appear for a ticket I received in 2009. I never received the letter to appear in court and I called the courthouse two times to see if the ticket was submitted, but each time they said it was not. I foolishly assumed the officer was not going to submit the ticket because of what happened when he wrote me the ticket. Originally he said paced me going 60 in a 35, and I told him that was impossible because I knew I wasn't going that fast. He came back and told me that another officer paced me going 45, then he asked me how fast I thought I was going, because at that point, I don't think he really knew. Anyway, because of that I thought he wasn't going to submit it. Well I thought wrong. I realize that it is ultimately my responsibility and I have paid the ticket and have my license reinstated. What I would like to know now is how bad this is going to hurt me in my background investigation. Is this going to kill my chances in law enforcement? Your insight and opinions would be greatly appreciated, thank you.
      This question is probably better suited in the hiring and recruitment section. However, I think you're going to get blasted for not taking care of it and knowing that it was your responsibility to do so. It's not going to look good that you "assumed", and BTW it's not ultimately your responsibility, it IS your responsibility.
      "Character is someone you are when no one is watching."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by POSr View Post
        This question is probably better suited in the hiring and recruitment section. However, I think you're going to get blasted for not taking care of it and knowing that it was your responsibility to do so. It's not going to look good that you "assumed", and BTW it's not ultimately your responsibility, it IS your responsibility.
        I apologize if I posted this in the wrong forum. Regarding your comment however, I already admitted that it was my fault and my responsibility. For you to nitpick my post and try to find something to scold me on, like the difference between "ultimately my responsibility" and "my responsibility" really was not necessary or helpful. Now if you think I am going to get blasted for not taking care of this and making a foolish assumption, well that I can understand. Sorry for the rant, but it really annoys me how some people on this forum act like they are the perfect beings in the eyes of God, and the law. Unfortunately, I am just a human being and sometimes, I make mistakes....gasp. I was just trying to gauge how detrimental this mistake would be.

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        • #5
          I'm just curious - when you signed the citation, didn't it state on the bottom to appear on or before a certain date? They susally do in California.
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1 View Post
            I'm just curious - when you signed the citation, didn't it state on the bottom to appear on or before a certain date? They susally do in California.

            No there was no date written on the ticket. Believe me if there was, I would have taken care of it promptly and wouldn't be in this mess. I called the courthouse a couple of times to see if I could go down and pay the ticket. Each time they told me the ticket had not been submitted yet and I couldn't do anything until it had been. They also told me the officer had one year to submit it, which I thought was a bit excessive. But anyway, I do remember the officer saying something about me getting something in the mail with my court date on it, which I thought was odd because I know they usually write it on the ticket. The thing that really bothers me is that the officer didn't even know how fast I was really going. If I had fought the ticket I could have probably beat it, but instead I am dealing with a failure to appear. But like I said previously it is "ultimately" my responsibility. I just hope this doesn't screw up my background investigation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by rs2010 View Post
              I apologize if I posted this in the wrong forum. Regarding your comment however, I already admitted that it was my fault and my responsibility. For you to nitpick my post and try to find something to scold me on, like the difference between "ultimately my responsibility" and "my responsibility" really was not necessary or helpful. Now if you think I am going to get blasted for not taking care of this and making a foolish assumption, well that I can understand. Sorry for the rant, but it really annoys me how some people on this forum act like they are the perfect beings in the eyes of God, and the law. Unfortunately, I am just a human being and sometimes, I make mistakes....gasp. I was just trying to gauge how detrimental this mistake would be.
              I don't believe I ever said this. A lot of law enforcement jobs require a high level of responsibility and accountability. When you screw up, it really helps for you to step up and take responsibility for your actions. I'm being blunt, and honest. A background investigator's job is to "nitpick". I hope you don't respond the same way. Good Luck!
              "Character is someone you are when no one is watching."

              Comment


              • #8
                Every citation/traffic ticket has explicit instructions on how to proceed (pay the fine, set up a court date, where to direct your questions, etc.) once you have been cited. If you had trouble understanding how to follow simple instructions (to the point that you lost your driving privileges), this would be a huge red flag on how you take direction. At the end of the day, this is not a deal breaker, but it will make it harder on you trying to get a L.E. job, especially due to how competitive the job market is.
                Secondly, you do not get to dictate how your question is answered. You were given an honest answer, not the answer you wanted to hear. I assure you, whoever does you background check or interview (if you make it that far), will be much harder on you than any of us. If you respond by being overly defensive or with an attitude, you will be toast.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Curly Bill View Post
                  Every citation/traffic ticket has explicit instructions on how to proceed (pay the fine, set up a court date, where to direct your questions, etc.) once you have been cited. If you had trouble understanding how to follow simple instructions (to the point that you lost your driving privileges), this would be a huge red flag on how you take direction. At the end of the day, this is not a deal breaker, but it will make it harder on you trying to get a L.E. job, especially due to how competitive the job market is.
                  Secondly, you do not get to dictate how your question is answered. You were given an honest answer, not the answer you wanted to hear. I assure you, whoever does you background check or interview (if you make it that far), will be much harder on you than any of us. If you respond by being overly defensive or with an attitude, you will be toast.
                  I was not asking for anyone to conduct a background investigation on me. I realize they are going to "nitpick." But I do not need you to reiterate my mistake. I understand my mistake and I have accepted it. All I asked was what kind of impact this would have on a background investigation.
                  I have served four years of honorable service in the Marine Corps with one combat tour of duty. Next month I will receive my Bachelors degree from the most prestigious public university in the country, if not the world. I think I have done okay so far in my life, so I really do not need you to lecture me on how to follow directions. Now if anyone can actually give me advice on how this will impact my background investigation without trying to belittle me for my mistake, that would be appreciated.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by POSr View Post
                    I don't believe I ever said this. A lot of law enforcement jobs require a high level of responsibility and accountability. When you screw up, it really helps for you to step up and take responsibility for your actions. I'm being blunt, and honest. A background investigator's job is to "nitpick". I hope you don't respond the same way. Good Luck!
                    You do not need to specifically utter those words, but that is how you come off. I have already accepted responsibility for my mistake many times in this thread. Not sure how I can make that any clearer for you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No belittling here, just the truth. If our responses ruffle your feathers this much, then maybe this is not the career for you. Our kurt responses are based on experience, not on what you want to hear. I don't care if you graduate from an Ivy league college our were the former leader of SEAL Team 6. If your attitude stinks, which based on your reaction so far it does, you don't have a prayer of being a cop until it improves. You can either get mad or change yourself for the better. We have also answered your question regarding your traffic ticket issue, but I'll repeat it once again. It is not a deal breaker, but it will be an uphill battle for you b/c most people applying for cop jobs have never had their license suspended. Some have even gone their whole life w/o ever recieving a ticket, on top of having the same quailifications you have. The job market is tough enough, it will be tougher if you have had a suspended license, and even tougher if you don't drop the attitude. You asked for insight, you got it, but then again, what do us cops know?
                      Last edited by Curly Bill; 04-15-2011, 06:42 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I appreciate your advice and insight, your ridicule however, not so much. It really annoys me when some on this forum take up this holier than thou attitude, when i'm sure they have plenty of skeletons in their closet. People like you remind me of the conservative politicians or preachers who are anti-homosexuality, and praise family values, then get caught having homosexual relationships with little boys.

                        If I do not get to be a police officer because of my failure to appear, I know I can serve my country again as an officer in the United States Marine corps. That is the great thing about having a college degree, you have options.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I seriously doubt it will hold you up. Unless you lie about it, or it has happened multiple times.
                          CBPO
                          TO - 05/08 JFK
                          EOD - 12/05/2011

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rs2010 View Post
                            You do not need to specifically utter those words, but that is how you come off. I have already accepted responsibility for my mistake many times in this thread. Not sure how I can make that any clearer for you.
                            From someone who does conduct BI I'll chime in here. Yes, this ticket may hurt your chances. For one, the initial citation shows disregard for the law. In most places a clean driving record for 3 years is usually preferred. Secondly, it shows that your license was suspended...not good. Third, I know you "justified" not paying the ticket; however, it is still your responsibility to make sure it gets paid on time, or that you appear before a judge.

                            Short answer, yes this will hurt your chances in law enforcement.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by mikeymedic View Post
                              From someone who does conduct BI I'll chime in here. Yes, this ticket may hurt your chances. For one, the initial citation shows disregard for the law. In most places a clean driving record for 3 years is usually preferred. Secondly, it shows that your license was suspended...not good. Third, I know you "justified" not paying the ticket; however, it is still your responsibility to make sure it gets paid on time, or that you appear before a judge.

                              Short answer, yes this will hurt your chances in law enforcement.
                              I appreciate your insight. I am completely unfamiliar with how background investigations work, so I was hoping you could help me with a few questions I had.
                              Do you ever let something like this go if you interview someone and get a good "vibe" from him? Is this kind of thing treated on a case by case basis? Would anything else in my background like military, and Bachelors degree make this not look as bad?

                              Comment

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