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  • Norfolk Southern Police

    I'm certified in Tennessee and currently employed as a police officer- I am curious if there are any Norfolk Southern special agents on here that would be willing to shoot me a private message. I have some questions I would like to ask.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Good luck with NS.

    I was looking at a few of the positions they have had in PA lately as I wouldn't mind getting back home. I have 8 years on (my cert in NY would easily transfer to Act 120 with a little refresher), a bachelor's in criminal justice, working on my Master's, am a certified instructor, etc, etc and got an e-mail 2 days after applying... thank, but no thanks.

    I'm not sure what they're looking for? I know investigative experience is a plus, but the job is still posted. They didn't even want to consider me.

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    • #3
      same out here in IL, a few people I know including myself put in for Chicago, all 10yrs plus exper and got the denial email within a few days.

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      • #4
        Class I railroad police jobs (UP, NS, BNSF, CSX) are extremely competitive due to the high pay, benefits and federal RR retirement. They usually get hundreds of applicants for just one opening. And unfortunately, it's the old "who you know, not what you know."

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        • #5
          I also applied to some of the open CSX gigs here in NY and in MA. I haven't heard anything, but am pretty sure that I will eventually get a rejection... or no contact at all. I have found that private enterprises, RR Police and many prestigious private universities such as UPenn, Cornell, and Yale seem to invest heavily in their police and the quality of their police.
          These same organizations also seem to allow for growth not only among the typical career ladder lines, but also to grow outside the police organization into other areas as your education (that they typically fund) permits.
          This commitment to quality personal development is a major draw for me to these types of jobs.

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          • #6
            I am not too sure about the high pay, but I think the benefits and retirement are pretty much the plus. I think CSX is one of the few with take home cars.... and ditto on the "thanks but no thanks". Any ideas what the average age of new RR police hires are?? Maybe I am too young?

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            • #7
              What does this job pay? Is it a set rate or is it based on the applicant's qualifications?

              Are these plain clothes jobs, uniformed, or a mix of both?

              Any idea what the "3 to 5 days per month" travel is all about?

              I'm considering submitting an app for the one PA job, but don't know much about the position and can't seem to find much online either. Thanks for any input others may have to offer.

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              • #8
                Starting pay for most of the Class I RRs is between $50,000 and $70,000 plus bonuses, ferderal RR retirement, etc. etc. Some have take home cars, and the job is a mix of uniform and soft clothes. It just depends on what you're doing. Large RRs cross multi-state borders so travel is sometimes needed. Again, it depends on what you're doing. NS and CSX pretty much cover the eastern half of the United States from the Mississippi River. UP and BNSF cover the western half. Just like any other place, age varies. Most importantly though, it's not always what you know, it's who you know. These positions are highly sought after, not to mention few and far between. When guys get in, they usually don't leave until they retire.

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                • #9
                  My first police job was with a Class II railroad in Massachusetts. It was a great gig; great pay, take home car, the best equipment, uniforms, etc. We covered all the New England states and into NY. My advice to anyone looking to get into RR law enforcement is get training that will make you stick out. RR law enforcement does entail some security type work but it also requires good investigative skills. Taking advanced courses in surveillance and investigation are a big plus. Also, HAZ MAT....if you want to work for a RR, get Haz Mat trained...operations level minimum but preferably technician level. Railroads love Haz Mat trained applicants. Most state fire academies offer this training usually at no cost. Also, contact your state Operation Lifesaver program and take the Grade Collision Investigation course. It's free of charge and provides alot of great info, plus, it looks great to a RR on a resume. Even with a RR law enforcement background and 14 years as a cop, I'm still playing the waiting game for another RR job. Like mentioned in previous RR police threads, there's alot of competition, make yourself stick out.

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                  • #10
                    Does anyone know the breakdown of the federal railroad retirement system as it pertains to police officers? Is it like many local agencies: 50% @ 20 years and must be 50 years old? What is the formula and age requirement?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rm6088 View Post
                      Does anyone know the breakdown of the federal railroad retirement system as it pertains to police officers? Is it like many local agencies: 50% @ 20 years and must be 50 years old? What is the formula and age requirement?
                      If im not mistaking I believe you have to do 30 or 32yrs. I believe I read that in another RR thread.

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                      • #12
                        Try this link, Im sure it will have your answers for you

                        http://www.rrb.gov/
                        Last edited by mjw5678; 03-20-2011, 10:03 PM.

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                        • #13
                          mjw5678,

                          The link didn't post...

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by rm6088 View Post
                            Does anyone know the breakdown of the federal railroad retirement system as it pertains to police officers? Is it like many local agencies: 50% @ 20 years and must be 50 years old? What is the formula and age requirement?
                            You get the same retirement as everyone else. Police officers do not have a special retirement catagory per RRB.


                            Railroad Retirement Act

                            Under the Railroad Retirement Act, retirement and disability annuities are paid to railroad workers with at least 10 years of service. Such annuities are also payable to workers with 5 years of service if performed after 1995.

                            Provisions

                            Full age annuities are payable at age 60 to workers with 30 years of service. For those with less than 30 years of service, reduced annuities are payable at age 62 and unreduced annuities are payable at full retirement age, which is gradually rising from 65 to 67, depending on the year of birth. Disability annuities can be paid on the basis of total or occupational disability. Annuities are also payable to spouses and divorced spouses of retired workers and to widow(er)s, surviving divorced spouses, remarried widow(er)s, children, and parents of deceased railroad workers. Qualified railroad retirement beneficiaries are covered by Medicare in the same way as social security beneficiaries.
                            I don't answer recruitment messages....

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                            • #15
                              My inforation is a little bit old, but my former roommate was a Norfolk Southern police officer and we worked together regularly for a couple of years. The pay was good, but not equal to the best paid departments in North Carolina. It was better than most (this was 8 years ago, anything could have happened since). The work day was a mix of patrol and investigations. They had a lot of discretion on how to work their cases. Thrown into the mix was the occasional stakeout type operation, directed at cargo theft. Post 9/11 they increased their uniform presence alot. Prior to 9/11 I never saw a NS officer in uniform, post 9/11 most of the time they were. There is no law enforcement retirement in the railroad system, at least not 3 years ago when my last active contact was retiring. Historically NS usually offered a buyout when you got close to retiring, but most people will work to an older age with the railroad than with most local departments. My room mate and my other contacts have all left the railroad over the last few years, and I no longer work around their property, so this info is not guaranteed up to date.

                              The day to day work varied quite a bit. In the larger cities, NS functioned like a traditional PD, but focused on RR issues. The former Conrail offices worked more like traditional PDs as well, according to my NS friends. They also had 1 man offices as well. In some respects a pretty cool job, but there was one NS agent who covered the western third, roughly, of North Carolina. That meant a fair amount of time driving. The office I worked with was 2-4 agents over the years. The guy on nights did more patrol type work, the guys on days did more investigative work, pre 9/11. Like I said, post 9/11, all hours of the day, I almost always saw the NS officers in uniform.

                              Comment

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