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  • dstoke
    commented on 's reply
    At least 5k, I’d say closer to 8. Plus hours saved when I can go straight to an interview or surveillance instead of having to drive to work and pick up a g ride for the day. In many states g rides are exempt from toll, instead of sitting in traffic during the rush hour I get to drive home sans headache on the toll way. Pretty sweet perks, no complaints from me.

  • Ratatatat
    replied
    I always laugh a bit when people complain about having a *company* car....

    No you can't go on vacation in it.

    No you can't go on a night on the town in it.

    No you can't take your kids to school in it.

    BUT- you don't have to pay for gas to get to work, something which costs many people a couple hundred bucks a month.

    You aren't paying for its insurance, maintenance, and repairs.

    You are paying less in auto insurance because you are putting fewer miles on your personal car.

    Your personal car is depreciating less because its odometer stays in lower digits.

    If you wreck a G car, a replacement is quickly issued.

    If you hurt someone in a crash and are the responsible party, the victim is more likely to go after deep pockets of the G than your insurance or assets.

    I would put the real value of a G ride around $5K a year in cost savings. At least.

    APPRECIATE having one because many don't, and agencies that do are under constant pressure by bureaucrats to find "alternative" solutions to reduce fleet costs, like everyone turns in their rides, then vehicles get signed out for the day as determined by operational needs.

    And when something is used by everyone, it's taken care of by no one. There will be tobacco bottle juice spilled all over the floor, McDonald bags under the seats, snot filled tissues everywhere, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lovetocamp
    commented on 's reply
    What battlewagon said. Regular BPAs do not get G-rides unless you're doing that resident agent thing up North. Where you're a peace officer but also do BP duties out of your own house.

  • hawaiitexas
    replied
    NPS depends on the park and the amount of call backs. Every BLM Ranger I know has a take home. Not as cool as you think as you cannot use it for any personal business, and your family cannot ride with you. People get hemmed up for abusing it frequently, the Secretary of Interior cannot even let his family ride in a G ride.

    Leave a comment:


  • 9L81
    replied
    It can be a pain. My kid recently changed schools to one about a 1/4 mile from home. So if I am picking up or dropping off I just walk over. Previous school was very close to mama's work. I only put about 2500-3000 miles a year on my POV anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • battlewagon
    commented on 's reply
    The answer is unequivocally no. Any position that get a G ride for BP are earned, higher up positions or competitive ones; K9, some Intel guys (far from all of them, busiest sector in the country, their BPA-Is do not get rides). The only sure bet are K9 handlers and the highest level brass. I know recently they started rolling back g rides and pretty much the only people left at station level were PAIC (station chiefs) and DPAIC.

  • battlewagon
    commented on 's reply
    This is government wide, at least as far as I'm aware. 30 days automatic.

  • battlewagon
    commented on 's reply
    This is true. For people who have G rides which they MUST drive to work, but also have to drop kids off at daycare, it is actually a major major PITA. Absolutely zero use allowed outside official work business.

  • IroqouisB
    replied
    From my experience, the feds have some strict rules... I’m a Detective with a local large agency, and I can literally drive my take home anywhere in the county with my family on the city’s dime. The only rule is, a non-city employee cannot operate my vehicle.

    I worked with some SA’s with the FBI for a few of my cases. A female agent I worked with, was always late to meetings. Because she would have to play musical cars with her POV and GOV, whenever she was dropping her kids off at school. Because her field office wouldn’t let her use her GOV for non-official business. Same thing with a USSS SA I worked with, who was apart of a cyber crimes task force. He was only able to drive his GOV for official business, and to and from work.

    The feds also drive obvious G-Rides. Dodge Chargers, Ford Taurus, and Chevy Impalas. My agency at least has some guys in units like narcotics, rolling around in Honda Civics with out of state license plates.
    Last edited by IroqouisB; 08-31-2019, 11:58 PM.

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  • 9L81
    replied
    30 days on the beach automatic for my agency. Legend has it one agent in my agency a few years back didnt have a POV for years. Finally it caught up to him. He admitted to using the G ride inappropriately and was given his 30 days. Didn't pay for gas, insurance, purchase or maintenance for about 3 years and got the same penalty as someone who stops at an ATM on their way home. Lesson is don't lie. That will get you fired.

    Leave a comment:


  • lehmeworkit
    replied
    Be WARNED! G-Rides....Improper use...will get you hemmed-up very fast. It's cool to have one, but they can be big time trouble for the KNUCKLE HEAD that's dumb enough to use it outside of established parameters.

    Leave a comment:


  • bkime1010
    replied
    If anyone is still reading this thread, the BLM and USFS 1801’s (patrol LEO’s) and 1811’s get G-rides in my District Office (Oregon)

    Leave a comment:


  • Fox402
    replied
    Originally posted by jchughes05 View Post
    I hear mixed answers on the USBP take-home car issue... some say yes, some no....
    Geez talk about necropost...And this question was already answered. Everyday line agents on the Southwestern border do not get g-rides. High ranking brass does, k-9 does, and sometimes some specialty units do. Northern border is the same but in some remote areas they have a few resident agents who get a g-ride. A g-ride is supposed to facilitate quick travel to crime scenes, call outs etc. As a Border Patrol Agent I always went to the station first for muster, so no need for a take home g-ride. And it can all change on the whims of management.
    Last edited by Fox402; 05-10-2013, 04:09 PM.

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  • jchughes05
    replied
    I hear mixed answers on the USBP take-home car issue... some say yes, some no....

    Leave a comment:


  • mtxpro752
    replied
    When I dated a DEA agent who had a take home ride I found it funny that the feds call it a G-ride. Us SoCal cops refer to stolen cars as G-rides, as well as the gangsters here.

    I came home one night and was talking about getting a G-ride and my chick replied with, "LAPD gave you a car to drive home?" LOL

    Leave a comment:

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