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Is this normal SOP for getting hired? BO is informing current employer of application

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  • Is this normal SOP for getting hired? BO is informing current employer of application

    My girlfriend is currently trying to get hired by a local police department, but as you all know the process is very long. She didn't tell her current employer about her applying or testing for fear it might spark a termination.

    She's into the background portion, and her BO clearly knew her current job was unaware of her applying yet he still setup an appointment with her supervisor. Isn't this some kind of breach of procedure? She is not trying to hide anything, she just wants to preserve her job incase she doesn't get hired (especially important during this economy). Her supervisor had a meeting with her over it, so obviously they now know.

    Also, she works around the fax machine at her job, since it is a small office and she noticed her BO sent a fax to her supervisor with the authorization of release of information she gave the dept. back when she applied. This slip of paper has ALL of her personal information on it, including her full social security number, and nobody was there to recieve the fax. This makes both of us very nervous because she has excellent credit, and good credit is absolutely necessary to get a job nowadays.

    I recommend she call the BO and ask him what the deal is, but she doesn't want to jepordize her chances, plus she already told him twice that her current job was unaware yet he still continued on. What would you suggest?

  • #2
    It's normal, live with it...no breach of protocol. When she signed up, she should have let her current employer know what was up. Now it would be closing the gate after the cows are out...
    It's not the will to win that matters...everyone has that. It's the will to prepare to win that matters.
    Paul "Bear" Bryant

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    • #3
      Originally posted by oneoldcop View Post
      It's normal, live with it...no breach of protocol. When she signed up, she should have let her current employer know what was up. Now it would be closing the gate after the cows are out...
      You're saying faxing personal information "blind" is protcol? You'd think the department would at least have asked her if it was OK to contact her employer now, instead of just doing it. If you were her supervisor who would you rather hear it from, your employee or a police officer? They didn't even give her the chance.

      Why even have the option to say NO to "may we contact your employer" if they are just going to do it anyways without any warning?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Null View Post
        You're saying faxing personal information "blind" is protcol? You'd think the department would at least have asked her if it was OK to contact her employer now, instead of just doing it. If you were her supervisor who would you rather hear it from, your employee or a police officer? They didn't even give her the chance.

        Why even have the option to say NO to "may we contact your employer" if they are just going to do it anyways without any warning?
        Let it go, its obviously the protocol of the local agency.

        I understand your concern but your opinion doesn't matter to the hiring agency. Just back off and let the BI run it course. I am sure her manager will not retaliate for her seeking a job in LE, if they did its not a smart move.

        Hang tight and relax.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Null View Post
          You're saying faxing personal information "blind" is protcol? You'd think the department would at least have asked her if it was OK to contact her employer now, instead of just doing it
          I'd be really surprised if she didn't sign in the beginning a document that gave the dept a clear go ahead to contact anyone and provide them with whatever info they deem necessary.... Most agencies do that when you apply....

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Null View Post
            You're saying faxing personal information "blind" is protcol? You'd think the department would at least have asked her if it was OK to contact her employer now, instead of just doing it. If you were her supervisor who would you rather hear it from, your employee or a police officer? They didn't even give her the chance.

            Why even have the option to say NO to "may we contact your employer" if they are just going to do it anyways without any warning?
            I can only speak from the federal side of things and I remember my BI for my first federal job.......

            Meeting with your current/past employers, neighbors, personal references is part of the background process period. I know it sucks. I think someone dropped the ball on the communication. Either your girlfriend knew (or should've knew) that the investigator was going to interview her employer, or the investigator should've called her first to tell her (if she didn't know already). If that would've been done, then she should've given her boss a heads up regarding that. From the federal side, it is a no-win situation seeing as you will go through the process, your boss knows you are looking at that point, and you will be in limbo for months (or longer) waiting for your new gig assuming you get it. After my invsestigation, I waited 2 months and in the meantime my hours at work were increased and the raise I was due magically never found its way on my paycheck. I'm really surprised your GF got blindsided by all of this. I thought that the investigator always interviews you first before hitting up your references.

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            • #7
              OP, did she think she was going to get hired as a police officer without the department contacting her current employer? Or is she simply upset that they did it by fax?

              Comment


              • #8
                Investigations are different all across the board. One thing most people don't realize is that the investigators are contracted out at times. This person has a set amount of time for a task. He might have to interview all neighbors, or all employers in his area of operations. All of these investigators have different hours and schedules and have many cases going on at once.

                Next, generally there will be a little box to check: Can we contact your current employer? Most people click yes in fear that if they say no, the investigator will think their supervisor will say something bad. I have put no plenty of times on current employers for the specific reason you brought up. Perhaps she could have put yes, then annotated next to the box "Please advise me before contacting current employer." There are no rules about inserting comments on the application. I have done it with every federal application I have submitted. I still got the job, and am done processing with others.

                I dont believe the investigator did anything wrong in this instance. Perhaps review her application and look to see if she was asked about contacting her current employer. There is nothing you can do now. The best thing to do is for her to act like it never happened or act as if she is no longer in the process so her boss will not treat her unfairly. She can't lie, that will burn a bridge and possibly hinder future background checks with that employer. She can, however, lead her employer to believe she is there to do her work and is not looking for other opportunities.

                Lastly, people's SSNs are not classified. They can be faxed to any machine. Perhaps it would have been better if the investigator mailed it, but hey, that would make the process a week or more longer right? If you are really concerned, obtain your credit report, especially if you have not received your free report every year.

                I do not agree with oneoldcop whatsoever. I advise highly that you DO NOT notify current employers that you are APPLYING somewhere else. If you get the job, or your employer must now be contacted by a BI, that is the time to tell them. No employer should ever know you are applying elsewhere. What if you don't get the job? What if you were just up for a big promotion and the next job will take 1-2 years to hire you? You are going to miss many opportunities if your employer knows you are only there till something else comes along. There is one possible instance in which I would tell a current employer - If this current employer believes in taking the next step and will prepare you in the current position for a position you are about to take.
                Last edited by formerusssnusmc; 03-23-2010, 11:26 AM.

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                • #9
                  The BI doesn't have to tell you that they are going to start interviewing references and former/current employers. You kinda give them that right when you apply for the job and submit the background info. To be fair, you know that the BI was going to contact them eventually. It's a courtesy if a BI calls you first and says "hey Im going to start talking to these people, do they know?" Personally I think it only makes sense that every BI do it this way to avoid issues, but I don't work as one so I can't judge.

                  I'm in the middle of one right now; I was lucky enough to have a BI call me beforehand. I too did not tell my employers because I thought I would face some sort of prejudice at the workplace. Luckily the BI called me up and asked me if I told my current employer about it; I told him know and explained to him the reason why and why I wanted to try to handle it delicately. He completely understood and acknowledged this.
                  "Officer, you are kinda hot."

                  "And you are kinda intoxicated."

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                  • #10
                    former,

                    Do you really think it's better not to tell your current employer? Think about it this way. You don't tell your employer and they find out the way this guys girlfriend found out. Now they're ****ed because it came out of no where. Now you tell them, they're prepared for whatever happens throughout the process. If the person doesn't get the job, the employer would much rather be in the loop than not. I've been in a couple process' myself. Didn't tell my last employer because the agency did a lot of things to **** people off. When I did get hired they held my file as long as they could, for made up reasons, because they were ****ed I never told them, former USSS leadership. Now if I wouldn't have gotten the job and they found out about it after the fact, it would have made life miserable. I know people that have been slapped in the face by doing this and I highly recommend at least letting them know. After that....document everything.

                    And the BI did nothing wrong here. when you sign the BI paperwork you waive information being passed out. Not like they're putting it on the internet or open forum. If you check "no" really all your saying that you would like to know if they need to contact them.
                    Last edited by manstown; 03-23-2010, 11:50 AM.

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